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If Nature thundered in his opening ears,
And stunned him with the music of the spheres,
How would he wish that Heaven had left him still
The whispering zephyr, and the purling rill!
Who finds not Providence all good and wise,
Alike in what it gives, and what denies ?

LESSON 100.

272. 1. Render the following Extract into correct Prose, according to Directions No. 241.

2. Give an Analysis with Remarks on the leading topics and arguments, according to No. 242.

3. Observations on the Figures of Speech, Epithets, and instances of Poetical License, according to No. 242.

273. SUBMISSION DUE TO PROVIDENCE.
What if the foot, ordain'd the dust to tread,
Or hand, to toil, aspired to be the head ?
What if the head, the eye, or ear, repin'd
To serve mere engines to the ruling mind?
Just as absurd for any part to claim
To be another in this general frame :
Just as absurd, to mourn the tasks or pains
The great directing Mind of all ordains.

All are but parts of one stupendous whole,
Whose body Nature is, and God the soul ;

That chang'd through all, and yet in all the same;
Great in the earth, as in the ethereal frame;
Warms in the sun, refreshes in the breeze,
Glows in the stars, and blossoms in the trees ;
Lives through all life, extends through all extent ;
Spreads undivided, operates unspent ;

Breathes in our soul, informs our mortal part,
As full, as perfect, in a hair as heart ;
As full, as perfect, in vile man that mourns,
As the rapt seraph that adores and burns:
To Him no high, no low, no great, no small ;
He fills, he bounds, connects, and equals all.

Cease, then, nor order imperfection name:
Our proper bliss depends on what we blame.
Know thy own point: this kind, this due degree
Of blindness, weakness, Heaven bestows on thee.
Submit. - In this, or any other sphere,
Secure to be as blest as thou canst bear:
Safe in the hand of one disposing Power,
Or in the natal, or the mortal hour.
All Nature is but Art, unknown to thee;
All Chance, Direction, which thou can’st not sec ;
All Discord, Harmony not understood ;
All partial Evil, universal Good.
And, spite of Pride, in erring Reason's spite,
One truth is clear, Whatever is, is right.

LESSON 101.

274. 1. Render the following Extract into correct Prose, according to Directions No. 241.

2. Give an Analysis with Remarks on the leading topics and arguments, according to No. 242.

3. Observations on the Figures of Speech, Epithets, and instances of Poetical License, according to No. 242.

275. VIRTUE ALONE TRUE HAPPINESS. Know then this truth (enough for man to know), “ Virtue alone is happiness below.”

The only point where human bliss stands still, And tastes the good without the fall to ill; Where only merit constant pay receives, Is blest in what it takes, and what it gives; The joy unequalled, if its end it gain, And if it lose, attended with no pain : Without satiety, though e'er so blest, And but more relished as the more distressed : The broadest mirth unfeeling folly wears, Less pleasing far than Virtue's very tears : : Good, from each object, from each place acquired, For ever exercised, yet never tired; Never elated, while one man's oppress'd ; Never dejected, while another's blest ; And where no wants, no wishes can remain, Since but to wish more virtue, is to gain.

See the sole bliss Heaven could on all bestow! Which who but feels can taste, but thinks can know : Yet poor with fortune, and with learning blind, The bad must miss; the good, untaught, will find ; Slave to no sect, who takes no private road, But looks through Nature, up to Nature's God; Pursues that chain which links th' immense design, Joins Heaven and Earth, and mortal and divine ; Sees, that no being any bliss can know, But touches some above, and some below ; Learns from this union of the rising whole The first, last purpose of the human soul ; And knows where faith, law, morals, all began, All end in love of God, and love of man. For him alone, Hope leads from goal to goal, And opens still, and opens on his soul : Till lengthen’d on to Faith, and unconfin'd, It pours the bliss that fills up all the mind.

LESSON 102. 276. 1. Render the following Extract into correct Prose, according to Directions No. 241.

2. Give an Analysis with Remarks on the leading topics and arguments, according to No. 242.

3. Observations on the Figures of Speech, Epithets, and instances of Poetical License, according to No. 242.

277. THE HOMES OF ENGLAND.
1. The stately homes of England,

How beautiful they stand;
Amidst their tall ancestral trees,

O'er all the pleasant land.
The deer across their greensward bound

Through shade and sunny gleam,
And the swan glides past them, with the sound

Of some rejoicing stream.
2. The merry homes of England !

Around their hearths by night
What gladsome looks of household love

Meet in the ruddy light!
There woman's voice flows forth in song,

Or childhood's tale is told,
Or lips move tunefully along

Some glorious page of old.
3. The blessed homes of England !

How softly on their bowers
Is laid the holy quietness

That breathes from Sabbath-hours !
Solemn, yet sweet, the church-bells' chime

Floats through their woods at morn;
All other sounds in that still time

Of breeze and leaf are born.

4. The cottage homes of England ! ' .

By thousands on her plains,
They are smiling o'er the silvery brooks,

And round the hamlet fanes.
Through glowing orchards forth they peep,

Each from its nook of leaves,
And fearless there the lowly sleep,-

As the bird beneath their eaves.
5. The free, fair homes of England !

Long, long, in hut and hall,
May hearts of native proof be reared

To guard each hallowed wall !
And green for ever be the groves,

And bright the flowery sod,
Where first the child's glad spirit loves

Its country and its God.

LESSON 103.

278. 1. Render the following Extract into correct Prose, according to Directions No. 241.

2. Give an Analysis with Remarks on the leading topics and arguments, according to No. 242.

3. Observations on the Figures of Speech, Epithets, and instances of Poetical License, according to No. 242.

279. GeniuS COLLECTING HIS STORES.
By these mysterious ties the busy power
Of Memory her ideal train preserves
Entire; or when they would elude her watch,
Reclaims their fleeting footsteps from the waste
Of dark oblivion ; thus collecting all
The various forms of being to present,

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