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greens clothe to the top mountain sides, mingling occasionally verdure with oak, elm, beech, maple, that shadow the valleys. 7. World of forest intersected by open pastures, the luxuriant lands border the water courses, the primeval woods fast ex. changing for agriculture. 8. The most populous town in the state contained in 1818 fewer than 3000; the inhabitants agricultural or grazing farmers, scattered through the villages and hills, or collected in small villages on the banks of the lakes and rivers.

LESSON 108. - Memoriter Exercise. 318. 1. Read the following Extract two or three times over, noticing the sequence of the sentences.

2. Reproduce the Example from recollection.

3. Institute a Comparison between your own and the original, when all deviations either in construction, punctuation, or sequence must be noticed.

319, MODEL. - BEAUTY OF THE MOUNTAINS IN JAMAICA.

1. The general appearance of the country in Jamaica differs greatly from most parts of Europe ; yet the north and south sides of the island, which are separated by a vast chain of mountains extending from east to west, differ at the same time widely from each other. When Columbus first discovered Jamaica, he approached it on the northern side; and, beholding that part of the country which now constitutes the parish of St. Anne, was filled with delight and admiration at the novelty, variety, and beauty of the prospect. The whole of the scenery is indeed superlatively fine, nor can words alone convey a just idea of it. A few leading particulars may perhaps be pointed out, but their combinations are infinitely varied, and must be seen in order to be understood. 2. The country at a small distance from the shore rises into hills, which are more remarkable for beauty than boldness ; being all of gentle acclivity, and commonly separated from each other by spacious vales and romantic inequalities; but they are seldom craggy, nor is the transition from the hills to the valleys oftentimes abrupt. In general, the hand of nature has rounded every hill towards the top with singular felicity. The most striking circumstances attending these beautiful swells are the happy disposition of the groves of pimento, with which most of them are spontaneously clothed, and the consummate verdure of the turf underneath, which is discoverable in a thousand openings; presenting a charming contrast to the deeper tints of the pimento. As this tree, which is no less remarkable for fragrancy than beauty, suffers no rival plant to flourish within its shade, these groves are not only clear of underwood, but even the grass beneath is seldom luxuriant.

- 3. The soil in general is a chalky marl, which produces a close and clean turf, as smooth and even as the finest English lawn, and in colour infinitely brighter. Over this beautiful surface, the pimento spreads itself in various compartments. In one place, we behold extensive groves ; in another a number of beautiful groups, some of which crown the hills, while others are scattered down the declivities. To enliven the scene, and add perfection to beauty, the bounty of nature has copiously watered the whole district. No part of the West Indies, that I have seen, abounds with so many delicious streams. Every valley has its rivulet, and every hill its cascade. In one point of view, where the rocks overhang the ocean, no fewer than eight transparent water-falls are beheld in the same moment. Those only who have been long at sea, can judge of the emotion which is felt by the thirsty voyager at so enchanting a prospect.

4. Such is the foreground of the picture. As the land rises towards the centre of the island, the eye, passing over the beauties that I have recounted, is attracted by a boundless amphitheatre of wood,

“ Insuperable height of loftiest shade,

Cedar, and branching palm;”. an immensity of forest; the outline of which melts into the distant blue hills, and these again are lost in the clouds.

Lesson 109. Hints. 320. From the following Hints, which are given in regular succession, produce a Description developed and expressed as nearly as possible in accordance with the rule:

321. PROSPECT FROM THE SUMMIT OF Mount Ærna.

1. On 27th of May, set off at midnight to see the rising sun from the top of Ætna. 2. Conducted by our guide over vast and wild deserts, scarcely human feet had trodden: sometimes gloomy forests, delightful by day, but from the darkness, rustling of trees, heavy, dull, mountain bellowing, vast expanse of ocean stretched far below us, a kind of awful horror. 3. After considerable labour, mixed with pleasure, arrived before dawn at the ruins of an ancient structure supposed to have been built by the philosopher Empedocles, who took up his abode here to study the nature of Mount Ætna.

4. Now the time to pay adorations in silent contemplation of the object of nature. 5. Sky clear, vault of heaven immense, appearing in awful majesty. 6. Struck with more veneration here than below, at first at a loss to know the cause ; observed with astonishment the number of stars infinitely increased, the light of each appeared brighter than usual. 7. Whiteness of milky way like a pure flame across the sky, clusters of stars which were invisible in the regions below. 8. At first, we did not perceive the cause, forgot we had passed through 10,000 feet of gross vapour that confuses every ray before it reaches the earth. 9. Amazed at the distinctness of vision, and exclaimed together, What a situation

for an Observatory! 10. Regretted Jupiter not visible, persuaded might have seen some of his satellites with the naked eye or with a very small pocket glass. 11. Observed a light a great way below down the mountain, which seemed to move among the forests, whether an ignis fatuus cannot say. 12. Noticed several of those meteors called falling stars, appeared as much above us as when on the plain ; probably these bodies move in regions much beyond the bounds assigned to our atmosphere.

13. After contemplating those, arrived after an hour's climbing where there was no snow, where a warm comfortable vapour issued from mountain, induced to halt. 14. From this spot about 300 yards from the highest summit, arrived, witnessed the most wonderful scene in nature.

LESSON 110.- Memoriter Exercise. 322. 1. Read the following Extract two or three times over, noticing the sequence of the sentences.

2. Reproduce the Example from recollection.

3. Institute a Comparison between your own and the original, when all deviations either in construction, punctuation, or sequence must be noticed.

323. MODEL. English Scenery. 1. The great charm of English scenery is the moral feeling that seems to pervade it. It is associated in the mind with ideas of order, of quiet, of sober, well-established principles, of hoary usage, and reverend custom. Every thing seems to be the growth of ages of regular and peaceful existence. The old church of remote architecture, with its low massive portal ; its gothic tower ; its windows rich with tracery and painted glass ; its stately monuments of warriors and worthies of the olden time, ancestors of the present lords of the soil ; its tomb. stones, recording successive generations of sturdy yeomanry, whose progeny still plough the same fields, and kneel at the same altar. The parsonage, a quaint irregular pile, partly antiquated, but repaired and altered in the tastes of various ages and occupants. The stile and foot-path leading from the churchyard, across pleasant fields, and along shady hedgerows, according to an immemorable right of way. The neighbouring village, with its venerable cottages, its public green, sheltered by trees, under which the forefathers of the present race have sported. The antique family mansion, standing apart in some little rural domain, but looking down with a protecting air on the surrounding scene. All these common features of English landscape evince a calm and settled security, an hereditary transmission of home-bred virtues and local attachments, that speak deeply and touchingly for the moral character of the nation.

2. It is a pleasing sight on a Sunday morning, when the bell is sending its sober melody across the quiet fields, to behold the peasantry in their best finery, with ruddy faces and modest cheerfulness, thronging tranquilly along the green lanes to church ; and it is also pleasing to see them in the evenings, gathering about their cottage doors, and appearing to exult in the humble comforts and embellishments which their own hands have spread around them.

3. It is this sweet home-feeling, this settled repose of affection in the domestic scene, that is, after all, the parent of the steadiest virtues and purest enjoyments.

LESSON 111. - Hints. 324. From the following Hints, which are given in regular succession, produce a Description developed and expressed as nearly as possible in accordance with the rule:

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