Cattle and cattle-breeders

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W. Blackwood, 1867 - 206 páginas
 

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Página 147 - Not one man in a thousand has accuracy of eye and judgment sufficient to become an eminent breeder. If, gifted with these qualities, he studies his subject for years, and devotes his lifetime to it with indomitable perseverance, he will succeed, and may make great improvements; if he wants any of these qualities, he will assuredly fail.
Página 155 - ... in, is not only against my experience, but, I believe, against nature. In looking over a herd of breeding cattle, I have often seen the owner or the cattlekeeper pointing out a cow that throws a good calf and never threw a bad one, and at the same time telling you how great a milker she is.
Página 160 - A person selecting a stock from which to breed, notwithstanding he has set up for himself a standard of perfection, will obtain them with qualifications of different descriptions, and in different degrees. In breeding from such he will exercise his judgment, and decide what are indispensable or desirable qualities, and will cross with animals with a view to establish them. His proceeding will be of the
Página 153 - We ought always to prefer a bull of high pedigree, with fair synimetry and quality, to another bull, though much superior in appearance, but of questionable pedigree. If the latter be turned to a herd superior in blood to himself, incalculable mischief may be done. Breeders have not given the subject the attention it deserves. I have paid dearly for my experience in the matter.
Página 161 - He will submit to the introduction of a trifling defect in order that he may profit by a great excellence ; and between excellences perhaps somewhat incompatible, he will decide on which is the greatest, and give it the preference.* " To a person commencing improvement, the best advice is to get as good a bull as he can, and if he be a good one of his kind, to use him indiscriminately with all his cows ; and when by this proceeding, which ought to be persisted in, his stock has, with an occasional...
Página 162 - ... all his cows ; and when by this proceeding, which ought to be persisted in, his stock has, with an occasional change of bull, become sufficiently stamped with desirable excellences, his selection of males should then be made to eradicate defects which he thinks desirable to be got rid of. He will not fail to keep in view the necessity of good blood in the bulls resorted to, for that will give the only assurance that they will transmit their own valuable properties to their offspring ; but he...
Página 161 - ... which ought to be persisted in, his stock has, with an occasional change of bull, become sufficiently stamped with desirable excellences, his selection of males should then be made, to eradicate defects which he thinks it desirable to get rid of. He will not fail to keep in view the necessity of good blood in the bulls resorted to, for that will give the only assurance that they will transmit their own valuable properties to their offspring ; but he must not depend on this alone, or he will soon...
Página 160 - His proceeding will be of the " give-and-take" kind. He will, if necessary, submit to the introduction of a trifling defect in order that he may profit by a great excellence ; and between excellences perhaps somewhat incompatible he will decide which is the greatest, and give it the preference. The following account of the way in which the new French breed of sheep, La Chamois, was originated, throws light upon an important...
Página 160 - This proceeding will be of the ' give-and-take* kind. He will submit to the introduction of a trifling defect, in order that he may profit by a great excellence ; and between excellences perhaps somewhat incompatible he will decide on which is the greatest, and give it the preference.
Página 204 - ... the disease, and one of them died. Many were the weary days and restless nights I endured when the disease got fairly developed through two of my largest steadings. It is in such cases that the value of a clear-headed veterinary surgeon is appreciated. I would not be well away from one steading, when a messenger would meet me with intelligence of some disaster at the other. I had many beasts being fed on other farms as well as those on my own— not fewer than 400 one way or other. I have said...

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