The True Briton ...

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book-sellers of London and Westminster., 1723
"His Grace the Duke of Wharton's speech in the House of Lords, on the third reading of the bill to inflict pains and penalties on Francis (late) Lord Bishop of Rochester" (with special t.-p. dated 1724): v. 2, p. [633]-685.
 

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Página 613 - He was haughty beyond expression, abject to those he saw he must stoop to, but imperious to all others. He had a violence of passion that carried him often to fits like madness, in which he had no temper. If he took a thing wrong, it was a vain thing to study to convince him: that would rather provoke him to swear, he would never be of another mind: he was to be let alone: and perhaps he would have forgot what he had said, and come about of his own accord. He was the coldest friend and the violentest...
Página 93 - ... defire. to have things governed rather by tricks and little arts, than according to the direction of the laws, or the bent of the people ; if they, who, Upon the virtuous...
Página 611 - He gave himself great liberties in discourse, and did not seem to have any regard to truth, or so much as to the appearances of it ; and was an implacable enemy : but he had a peculiar way to make his friends depend on him, and to believe he was true to them. He was a positive, and undertaking man : so he gave the King great ease, by assuring him all things would go according to his mind in the next session of parliament. And when his hopes failed him, he had always some excuse ready to put the miscarriage...
Página 57 - Refpected by Both. NO other Crime can be laid to his Charge, but that for which he now fuffers, which over-ballances all 'his Virtues. THE Malice of his Enemies infinuated, That he would change his Religion when he came into Foreign Countries, and be deluded into the Errors of the Church of Rome : But he declared in his Defence before...
Página 5 - Sincerity, as thole of Greater Figure or Power. Such as can have no other Opportunities of publishing their Thoughts, but by communicating of them to the World in Print, wou'd be wanting in their Duty, fhou'd they negled taking that Method of informing their Fellqw -Subjects of Matters, which perhaps, otherwise, might efcape their Knowledge, tho' neceflary for them to be acquainted with.
Página 614 - His strength lay in the knowledge of England, and of all the considerable men in it. He understood well the size of their understandings, and their tempers: And he knew how to apply himself to them so dextrously, that, tho...
Página 232 - ... who build their own houses with the wreck and dissipation of a whole kingdom. Princes and great men would be happy, if, without dying by proxy, they could live in person ; they are born oftentimes with excellent qualities, and are calm seas, filled with riches and power, that might do good to all the world, if the winds would but let them flow gently, according to their own nature. But, as extraordinary beauties are courted by variety of lovers, so such exalted conditions rarely want a swarm...
Página 614 - He had a particular talent to make others trust to his judgment, and depend on it: And he brought over so many to a submission to his opinion, that I never knew any man equal to him in the art of governing parties, and of making himself the head of them.
Página 542 - Great and high, The world knows only two, that's Rome and I. My roof receives me not ; 'tis air I tread ; And, at each step, I feel my advanced head Knock out a star in heaven...

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