Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

Table 1.—Principal concessions made on Argentine agriculiural imports into ihe United States, effective Nov. 15, 1941-Continued

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

United States duty

Para-
graph
number
in act of

1930

Product

1922

1930

Before agreement

Under agreement

Before
agree-
ment

705 Meat extract 15 cents per pound. 15 cents per pound. 15cents per pound 742 cents per

pound.
706 Meats, prepared 20 percent ad 6 cents per pound 6 cents per pound 3 cents per pound
or preserved. valorem.

but not less but not less but not less
Beer, canned,

than 20 percent than 20 percent than 20 percent including corned

ad valorem.
ad valorem.

ad valorem.
beer.
Beef and veal, do

do.
.do

..do
pickled or cured.
Canned meats, do.

do.
n, e. s. and pre-
pared or pre-
served meat
n. s. p. I., in-
cluding liver

paste.
710 Cheeses, Italian 5 cents per pound 7 cents per pound 7 cents per pound 5 cents per pound
types.5 11

but not less but not less but not less but not less
than 25 percent than 35 percent than 35 percent than 25 percent
ad valorem. ad valorem.

ad valorem. ad valorem.
742 Grapes (including 25 cents per cubic 25 cents per cubic 25 cents per cubic 12% cents per
hothouse grapes) foot.

foot.14

cubic foot Feb.
in bulk, crates,

15 to June 30,
barrels, or other

inclusive.
packages.
748 Plums, prunes, % cent per pound. y cent per pound. % cent per pound. x cent per pound
and prunelles

Feb. 1 to May
(green or ripe

31, inclusive.
not in brine).
749 Pears (green, % cent per pound cent per pound cent per pound. Bound.

ripe, or in brine).
751 Jellies, jams, mar- 35 percent ad va- 35 percent ad valo- 20percent ad valo- 17% percent ad
malades, and lorem.

rem. rem, 17

valorem. fruit butters:

Quince.
Footnotes at end of table.

foot.

16 130

[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]

762 | Flaxseed. 40 cents per bushel. 65 cents per bushel. 65 cents per bushel | 50 cents per bushel

except for the
duration of the
emergency it
will be 3242
cents per bush-

el.18
763
Alfalfa seed. 4 cents per pound 8 cents per pound. 4 cents per Bound.

pound.19
764
Canary seed 1 cent per pound.. i cent per pound.. % cent per cent per pound.

pound.20
772 Tomatoes, pre- 15 percent ad va- 50 percent ad va- 50 percent ad va- 25 percent ad va-
pared or pre- lorem.

lorem.
lorem.

lorem.
served in any

manner.
774 Asparagus, in its 25 percent ad va- 50 pecrent ad va- 50 percent ad va- 25 percent from
natural state. lorem.

lorem.
lorem.

Nov. 16 to Feb.

15, inclusive. 775 Corned-beef hash 35 percent ad va- 35 percent ad va- 35 percent ad va- 20 percent ad va

lorem.
lorem.
lorem.

lorem.
779 Broomcorn

Free
$20 per ton

$20 per ton. $10 per ton
1101 (a) Wools, not finer

than 40s not im-
ported under
bond for the
manufacture of

carpeting, etc.23
In the grease or 12 cents or 18 cents 24 cents per pound. 24 cents per 13 cents per
washed.
per pound 24 25

pound, 28

pound.26
Scoured..

24 cents per 27 cents per 27 cents per 16 cents per
pound.24
pound.26
pound.26

pound.26 Sorted, or match-|(27).

25 cents per pound. 25 cents per pound. 14 cents per pound.
ings, if not

scoured.
On the skin. 11 cents per 22 cents per 22 cents per 11 cents per

pound.24
pound.26
pound.28

pound.26
101 (b) Wools, not finer Free.

Free.
Free

Bonnd free.
than 40s, im-
ported under
bond for the
manufacture of
carpeting,

etc. 23 28 Footnotes at end of table.

[blocks in formation]
[graphic]

Table 1.-Principal concessions made on Argentine agricultural imports into the United States, effective Nov. 15, 1941-Continued

1939 imports for consumption

United States duty

Ad valorem equiv-
alent on basis of
imports in 1939

Quantity

Value

1930

Before agreement

Under agreement

Before
agree-
ment

Under
agree-
ment

Unit

From all
countries

From
Argen-
tina

From all
countries

From
Argen
tina

Percent

Percent

Thousands

Thousands

1,000 dollars

1,000 dollars

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Para.
graph
number
in act of

1930

Product

1922

1102 (a) Wools, not spe.

cially provided
for, not finer
than 44s:
In the grease

or washed.
Scoured.

31 cents
pound.26

.do.*

(27).

On the skin... 30 cents

pound.26
Sorted, or

matchings,
if not

scoured.
1630 Cattle hides and

Free
skins, including
kidskins and
calfskins, raw,
uncured, dried,
salted,

or
pickled, and
buffalo hides
not specially

provided for. 70
1558 Dog food, canned 20 percent ad

and frozen, con- valorum
taining little or

no cereals.
1602 Maté, crude ai Free.

Natural and uncompounded, but advanced in value or condition by shredding, grinding, chipping, crushing, or any other process of treatment whatever beyond that essential to
proper packing and the prevention of decay or deterioration pending manufacture, not containing alcohol.

2 Reduced in the Brazilian trade agreement, effective Jan. 1, 1936. 3 This excise became effective Aug. 21, 1936. * Data not available.

86405–43449

Schedule III item on which United States can withdraw concession any time after the termination of hostilities between the United Kingdom and Germany, provided 6 months' written notice is given to the Argentine Government.

6 Less than 500 pounds.
7 Less than $500.
8 Bound in trade agreement with United Kingdom, effective Jan. 1, 1939.

• Includes prepared or preserved meats not otherwise specially provided for, except meat pastes other than liver pastes packed in air-tight containers weighing with their contents
not more than 3 ounces each.

10 Does not include duties on imports into Virgin Islands of United States.
11 Includes Romano, Pecorino, Reggiano, Parmesan, Provoloni, Sbrinz, and Goya in their original loaves.
12 Includes Romano, Pecorino, Reggiano, Parmesan, and Provoloni. Separate import statistics on Sbrinzand Goya not reported by Bureau of Foreign Cornerce and Navigation.

13 Includes Romano, Pecorino, Reggiano, Parmesan, Provolini, and cheese classified in import statistics as "other cheese," since imports in this classification coming from Argen-
tina consist mostly of Sbrinz and Goya.

14 Duty on hothouse grapes was bound against increase in trade agreement with Belgium, effective May 1, 1935.
13 Covers prunes, prunelles, and plums, green, ripe, or in brine, as import statistics are reported by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
16 Covers pears, green, ripe, or in brine, as import statistics are reported by Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.

17 Reduced in trade agreement with United Kingdom, effective Jan. 1, 1939. Duty on products of Cuba (except orange marmalade) reduced from 23 to 14 percent ad valorem
in the trade agreement with Cuba, effective Sept. 3, 1934.

18 The duty will revert to 50 cents, 30 days after proclamation by the President (following consultation with the Argentine Government) that the abnormal situation in the flax-
seed trade is ended.

19 Reduced to 4 cents in first trade agreement with Canada, effective Jan. 1, 1936, and bound at 4 cents in the second Canadian agreement, effective Jan. 1, 1939.
20 Reduced to 34 cent per pound in Turkish agreement, effective May 5, 1939.
21 Asparagus imports not separately reported. Data are for "fresh vegetables, n. e. s.," of which imports from Argentina are assumed to be asparagus.

22 Imports from Argentina of "pastes, balls, puddings, hash, and similar mixtures of vegetables, meat, or fish, not specially provided for," as classified in import statistics. These
are known to consist almost entirely of corned beef hash.

23 Sections 1101 (a) and (b) include Donskoi, Smyrna, Cordova, Valparaiso, Ecuadoran, Syrian, Aleppo, Georgian, Turkestan, Arabian, Bagdad, Persian, Sistan, East Indian,
Thibetan, Chinese, Manchurian, Mongolian, Egyptian, Sudan, Cyprus, Sardinian, Pyrenean, Oporto, Iceland, Scotch Blackface, Black Spanish, Kerry, Haslock, and Welsh
Mountain; similar wools without merino or English blood; all other wools of whatever blood or origin not finer than 40s.

24 Actual weight.
25 12 cents for wool in the grease and 18 cents for washed wool.
26 Clean content.
27 Not specifically provided for in 1922 act.

28 The act of 1930 contains a provision whereby the duty is refunded on wools not finer than 40s that are imported under bond for the manufacture of competing and certain other
articles. This provision is bound in the trade agreement.

29 Except hides and skins of the India water buffalo imported to be used in the manufacture of rawhide articles.
30 Product of Cuba dutiable at 20 percent preferential reduction as provided in commercial treaty of 1904.

31 Natural and uncompounded and in a crude state, not advanced in value or condition by shredding, grinding, chipping, crushing, or any other process or treatment whatever
beyond that essential to proper packing and the prevention of decay or deterioration pending manufacture, not containing alcohol.

[graphic]

The CHAIRMAN. The next witness is Mr. Carl H. Wilken, Raw Materials National Council, Sioux City, Iowa. Is Mr. Wilken here!

Please identify yourself by giving your name and address for the benefit of the record, Mr. Wilken.

STATEMENT OF CARL H. WILKEN, ECONOMIC ANALYST, RAW

MATERIALS NATIONAL COUNCIL, SIOUX CITY, IOWA

Mr. WILKEN. My name is Carl H. Wilken, economic analyst of the Raw Materials National Council at Sioux City, Iowa.

The CHAIRMAN. How much time do you think you need without interruption ?

Mr. WILKEN. About 7 or 8 minutes.
The CHAIRMAN. You may proceed.

Mr. WILKEN. At previous meetings with this committee I have pointed out that the Raw Materials National Council is an independent research organization supported by citizens in the Sioux City area.

Today my purpose in appearing before your committee is to point out the tremendous importance of trade agreements to the people of the United States and the future of the world as a whole. Trade agreements and the conditions under which they operate strike at the very heart of our form of government and fundamental economy. Our forefathers fought a war to establish their right to govern themselves and protect themselves against exploitation. They drafted the Constitution as a framework of Government and economy to protect our civil, religious, and economic freedom.

The history of the world proves that the loss of economic freedom is the road to the loss of civil and religious freedoms. Even in our Nation unsound economic practices in the past have led to such centralization of Government that many fear the loss of the freedom that our people have enjoyed.

Our forefathers provided the needed protection when they drafted the Constitution, but politics, selfishness, and social reform have prevented the protection from being rightly used. Both the Democratic and Republican Parties can be charged with improperly exercising the economic powers given to the people in the Constitution.

It might be well to analyze our fundamental economy as it was put into operation under our form of government:

The people of any nation, to enjoy economic freedom, must have a proper measure of value for the goods and services they produce. It is impossible to maintain freedom where human labor is exploited through low wages for their services.

Our forefathers recognized this fact and gave Congress the right "to regulate the value of our dollar,” which is our medium of exchange and our measure of values. There has been much confusion about parity prices for farm products, but a study of the Nation as a business reveals that parity prices mean a 100-cent dollar or a measure of value that places the farmer on an equal economic status with industry, labor, and other groups. The parity equation applies to all goods and services.

The very essence of our Government is equality, and equality must extend all the way. Equality of price in measuring the dollar value

« AnteriorContinuar »