Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB
[graphic][subsumed][merged small][ocr errors]

THE

MISCELLANEOUS WORKS

OP

OLIVER GOLDSMITH, M.B.

TO WHICH IS PREFIXED

SOME ACCOUNT OF HIS LIFE AND WRITINGS.

A NEW EDITION, COMPLETE IN ONE VOLUME.

EDINBURGH:
PRINTED FOR THOMAS NELSON.

1840.

[ocr errors][ocr errors]

CONTENTS.

CHAP

PAGE

CHAP

PAGE

28

31

32

[ocr errors]

35

.

40

43

45
46

.

48

1. The description of the family of Wake-

field, in which a kindred likeness

prevails, as well. of minds as of

persons

II. Family misfortunes. The loss of for-

tune only serves to increase the

pride of the worthy

III. A migration. The fortunate circum-

stances of our lives are generally

found at last to be of our own pro-

curing

IV. A proof that even the humblest for-

tune may grant happiness, which

depends not on circumstances but

constitution

V. A new and great acquaintance intro-

duced. What we place most hopes

upon generally proves most fatal

VL The happiness of a country fireside

VII. A town wit described. The dullest

fellows may learn to be comical for

a night or two

VIII. An amour, which promises little

good fortune, yet may be produc-

tive of much

IX. Two ladies of great distinction intro-

duced. Superior finery ever seems

to confer superior breeding

X. The family endeavour to cope with

their betters. The miseries of the

poor when they attempt to appear

above their circumstances

XI. The family still resolve to hold up

their heads

XI. Fortune seems resolved to humble

the family of Wakefield. Morti.

fications are often more painful

than real calamities

XIII Mr Burchell is found to be an

enemy, for he has the confidence to

give disagreeable advice

XIV. Fresh mortification, or a demon-

stration that seeming calamities

may be real blessings

XV. All Mr Burchell's villany at once

detected. The folly of being over-

wise

XVI. The family use art, which

is

op-

posed with still greater

XVII. Scarcely any virtue found to re-

52

56

[ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]

PAGE LETTER

PAGS

.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

CHAP,

II, The causes which contribute to the

His motives for the journey

decline of learning

ib.

Some description of the streets

III. A view of the obscure ages

72

and houses.

ib.

IV. Of the present state of polite learning III. The description of London continu-

in Italy

73

ed.

The luxury of the English.

V. Of polite learning in Germany. 74

Its benefits. The fine gentleman.

VI. Of polite learning in Holland, and

The fine lady

178

some other countries of Europe 75 IV. English pride. Liberty.

An in

VII.

stance of both.

77

Of polite learning in France

VIII.S

Newspapers.

Politeness

179

IX. Of learning in Great Britain 79 V. English passion for politics. A spe-

X. Of rewarding genius in England 80

cimen of a newspaper.

Character-

XI. Of the marks of literary decay in

istic of the manners of different

France and England

83

countries

181

XII. Of the Stage

85 VI. Happiness lost by seeking after re-

XIII. On Universities

87

finement. The Chinese philoso-

XIV. The Conclusion .

88 pher's disgraces

182

VII. The tie of wisdom only to make us

MISCELLANEOUS POEMS.

happy. The benefits of travelling

upon the morals of a philosopher 183

Prologue by Laberius

93 VIII. The Chinese deceived by a prosti.

The Double Transformation

ib.

tute in the streets of London 184

New Simile in the manner of Swift 94 IX. The licentiousness of the English,

Description of an Author's Bedchamber 95

with regard to women. Character

The Hermit. A Ballad

ib.

of a woman's man

ib.

An Elegy on the Death of a Mad Dog 97 X. The journey of the Chinese from Pe-

Stanzas on Woman

ib.

kin to Moscow. The customs of

The Traveller ; or, a Prospect of Society 98 the Daures

185

The Deserted Village

103 XI. The benefits of luxury, in making a

The Gift

107 people more wise and happy. 186

Epitaph on

Dr Parnell

ib. XII. The funeral solemnities of the Eng-

Epilogue to the Comedy of the Sisters ib. lish. Their passion for flattering

Epilogue spoken by Mrs Bulkley and

epitaphs

187

Miss Catley

108 XIII. An account of Westminster Abi

Epilogue inter ded for Mrs Bulkley . 109 bey

158

The launch of Venison

ib. XIV. The reception of the Chinese from

Song from the Oratorio of the Captivity lll a lady of distinction

190

Song

ib. XV. Against cruelty to animals. А

The Clown's Reply

ib.

story from the Zendevest of Zoroas-

Epitaph on Edward Purdon

ter

191

An Elegy on Mrs Mary Blaize

ib. XVI. Of falsehood propagated by books

Retaliation

112 seemingly sincere :

192

Postscript to ditto .

114 XVII. Of the war now carried on be-

Song

ib. tween France and England, with

Prologue to Zobeide

ib.

its frivoluus motives

193

Epilogue spoken by Mr Lewes

115 XVIII. The story of the Chinese matron 194

The Logicians Refuted .

ib. XIX. The English method of treating

Stanzas on the taking of Quebec

116 women caught in adultery. The

On a beautiful Youth struck blind with

Russian method

196

Lightning

ib. xx. Some account of the republic of let:

A Sonnet

ib.

ters in England

197

XXI. The Chinese goes to see the play 198

DRAMATIC.

XXII. The Chinese philosopher's son

made a slave in Persia .

200

The Good Natured Man. A Comedy · 119 XXIII. The English subscription in fa-

She Stoops to Conquer ; or, the Mistakes

vour of the French prisoners com-

of a Night. A Comedy

145

mended

201

XXIV. The venders of quack medicines

and nostrums ridiculed .

202

XXV. The natural rise and decline of

kingdoms, exemplified in the his.

tory of the kingdom of Lao . 203

LETTER

XXVI. The character of the man in black,

I. Introduction. A character of the Chi-

with some instances of his incon-

nese philosopher.

177

sistent conduct

204

II. The arrival of the Chinese in London. XXV - The history of the man in black 206

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

.

.

[ocr errors]

LETTERS FROM A CITIZEN OF THE WORLD TO

HIS FRIENDS IN THE EAST.

« AnteriorContinuar »