The British Novelists: With an Essay, and Prefaces, Biographical and Critical, Volumen45

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F. C. and J. Rivington, 1820
 

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Página 75 - I care not, Fortune, what you me deny: You cannot rob me of free Nature's grace: You cannot shut the windows of the sky, Through which Aurora shows her bright'ning face; You cannot bar my constant feet to trace The woods and lawns, by living stream, at eve: Let health my nerves and finer fibres brace, And I their toys to the great Children leave: Of fancy, reason, virtue, nought can me bereave.
Página 37 - IX. 0 how canst thou renounce the boundless store Of charms which Nature to her votary yields! The warbling woodland, the resounding shore, The pomp of groves, and garniture of fields; All that the genial ray of morning gilds, And all that echoes to the song of even, All that the mountain's sheltering bosom shields, And all the dread magnificence of heaven, O how canst thou renounce, and hope to be forgiven ! X.
Página 143 - Can such things be, And overcome us like a summer's cloud, Without our special wonder?
Página 200 - Placed far amid the melancholy main, (Whether it be lone fancy him beguiles ; Or that aerial beings sometimes deign To stand embodied, to our senses plain) Sees on the naked hill, or valley low, The whilst in ocean Phoebus dips his wain, A vast assembly moving to and fro: Then all at once in air dissolves the wondrous show.
Página 257 - He reads much; He is a great observer, and he looks Quite through the deeds of men: he loves no plays, As thou dost, Antony; he hears no music: Seldom he smiles, and smiles in such a sort As if he mock'd himself, and scorn'd his spirit That could be mov'd to smile at any thing.
Página 37 - O, how canst thou renounce the boundless store Of charms which Nature to her votary yields ! The warbling woodland, the resounding shore, The pomp of groves, and garniture of fields ; All that the genial ray of morning gilds, » And all that echoes to the song of even, All that the mountain's sheltering bosom shields, And all the dread magnificence of Heaven, O, how canst thou renounce^ and hope to be forgiven...
Página 101 - Let those deplore their doom Whose hope still grovels in this dark sojourn : But lofty souls, who look beyond the tomb, .Can smile at Fate, and wonder how they mourn.' Shall Spring to these sad scenes no more return ? Is yonder wave the sun's eternal bed * Soon shall the orient with new lustre burn, And Spring shall soon her vital influence shed, Again attune the grove, again adorn the mead.
Página 3 - ... of Monsieur and Madame St. Aubert, made her an early proficient. The windows of this room .were particularly pleasant ; they descended to the floor, and, opening upon the little lawn that surrounded the house, the eye was led between groves of almond-, palm-trees, flowering-ash, and myrtle, to the distant landscape, where the Garonne wandered.
Página 96 - At last a soft and solemn-breathing sound Rose like a steam of rich distilled perfumes, And stole upon the air, that even Silence Was took ere she was ware, and wished she might Deny her nature, and be never more Still to be so displaced. I was all ear, And took in strains that might create a soul Under the ribs of death...

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