Peter Parley's Universal History, on the Basis of Geography

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About the great Assyrian Empire and Reign of Queen Semiramis
23
About Ninias Reign of Sardanapalus and end of the Assyrian Empire
26
About the Hebrews or Jews Origin off the Hebrews The removal of Jacob and his Children to Egypt
27
The Bondage in Egypt Flight of the Hebrews and Destruction of Pharaoh and his Host
31
About the Wanderings of the Israelites in the Wilde ness
34
Overthrow of the Midianites Samson Judge of Israel
37
Beginning of the reign of Saul
39
The reign of David Wisdom of Solomon
41
Building of the Temple Visit of the Queen of Sheba 18 The Deeline of the Jewish nation
44
Crucifixion of our Lord Destruction of Jerusalem
54
Expedition of Xerxes into Greece
62
Reign of Cambyses 24 Affairs of Persia till the Saracen Conquest
65
Modern History of Persia
66
Early History of China
70
Anecdotes of the Chinese Emperors 28 Cities of China Manners of the Chinese
75
29 Origin of the Arabs Rise of Mohammed
79
Sequel of the History of the Saracens
83
About Syria Phoenicia and Asia Minor
85
Page
87
A brief view of several Nations
90
Review of the History of Asia
92
Chronology of Asia
97
About the Geography of Africa The Inhabitants
100
Early Sovereigns of Egypt
103
Egyptian Architecture and Sculpture
108
The Ptolemies and Queen Cleopatra
112
Sequel of the Egyptian History
114
Summary of Æthiopian Affairs
116
Origin of the Barbary States and their Piracies on the Christians
117
Fables and Facts about Africa
120
The Slave Trade
122
Chronology of Africa
123
Introductory Remarks on its Geography and other matters
124
About Greece where it is situated appearance of the Country Climate
128
The extent of Greece First Settlement of the Country
131
The Grecian Lawgivers
133
War with Persia
135
Affairs of Athens
137
Beginning of the Theban War
140
Sequel of the Theban War
142
Grecian Mythology or Religion
144
The Grecian Philosophers
148
Something more about Philosophers About the Greek Poets
152
About the Mode of Life among the ancient Greeks
154
Philip of Macedon conquers Greece
159
Conquests of Alexander the Great
161
Sequel of Alexanders career
163
Greece invaded by the Gauls
165
End of Grecian Independence
167
Modern History of Greece
170
Chronology of Greece
172
About Italy as it now is
173
Founding of Rome by Romulus Its early State 66 Battle of the Horatii and Curiatii
180
From the reign of Ancus Martius till the expulsion of the Kings
182
The Story of Coriolanus
187
Second and third Punic Wars
189
A Roman Triumph
192
Sylla and Marius
196
Cæsar usurps the Supreme Power
198
Assassination of Julius Caesar
199
About the Saracens How the Turks overturned
251
Wars between the Moors and the Spaniards
259
A short Story about Portugal
267
the southern parts of Europe were first settled and how the northern parts were settled afterwards
275
The Gauls Origin of the French nation
279
About Clovis and little King Pepin
280
The Reign of Charlemagne
282
About the Crusades or Holy Wars
285
About the Feudal System
288
About Chivalry or Knight Errantry
292
King Philip and Pope Boniface Wars of the French and English
298
The Reigns of seyeral French Kings
301
The French Revolution
306
Napoleon Buonaparte
308
Recent affairs of France
311
Chronology of France
312
About Germany
315
About the ancient Tribes of Germany Charlemagne c
317
Affairs of Switzerland
322
Sequel of German History
324
About the Austrian Empire
326
About Hungary Bohemia the Tyrol c
329
About Prussia
331
History of Prussia
334
Chronology of Germany Austria Hungary and Prussia
336
Description of Russia
337
The Reign of Peter the Great
344
The Successors of Peter the Great 128 About Sweden
349
Charles the Twelfth and his Successors i
351
About Lapland Norway and Denmark
354
Brief Notices of several Kingdoms and States
359
Chronology of Russia Sweden Lapland Norway Den mark Holland Belgium c
362
Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
364
Origin of the British Nation The Druids
371
From William the Conqueror to King John
378
House of Lancaster
385
The House of Tudor
391
The Commonwealth
400
The House of Hanover
407
About Ireland
415
Review The Dark Ages Important Inventions c
422
AMERICA
428
Discovery of America by Columbus
437
The American War
444
Account of Peru
453
Conquest of the West Indies their present State
460
Chap Page 168 About Oceania The Malaysian Islands
468
Australasia
470
Polynesia
472
The Mutiny of the Bounty
475
Chronology of Oceania
481
Duration of the Empires of Asia and Europe
482
Duration of the Empires of Europe
485
Ancient Names of Countries
490
GENERAL VIEWS 176 The Origin and Progress of Government
492
Architecture Agriculture Gardening
494
Commerce
497
Painting Sculpture and Music
502
Origin and Progress of various Arts
506
Dates of Discoveries and Inventions
509

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Página 492 - Whatever rude structure the climate or materials of any country forced the first inhabitants to construct, the same form was kept up in after years by their more refined posterity. 3. Thus the Egyptian style of building derived its origin from the cavern and mound; the Chinese from the tent; the Grecian from the wooden cabin; and the Gothic from the bower of trees.
Página 239 - XVIII. a layman, was made pope 1024. The first pope who kept an army was Leo IX. 1054. Gregory VII. obliged Henry IV., emperor of Germany, to stand three days in the depth of winter, barefooted at his castle gate, to implore his pardon, 1077. The pope's authority was firmly fixed in England 1079.
Página 163 - I am a robber by the same right that you are a conqueror," was the reply. " The only difference between us is, that I have but a few men, and can do but little mischief ; while you have a large army, and can do a great deal.
Página 99 - Beside the negroes, there are several other races of Africans. The inhabitants from Egypt to Abyssinia appear to consist of the original Egyptian people, mixed with Turks, Arabs, and others. The people of the Barbary states are the descendants of the ancient Carthaginians, mingled with the Saracens who conquered the country, together with Turks and Arabs.
Página 218 - It then gradually fell into disuse. 2. Among the Romans, the bed of the sick was never abandoned to hired nurses and servants. It was attended by the relatives and intimates, who waited till the last hour, and bade a last farewell to their dying friend. 3. The body of the dead was bathed in perfumes, dressed in rich garments, and laid out on a couch strewed with flowers. The outer door of the house was shaded with branches of cypress. According to the heathen my-thol'-o-gy, Cha'-ron would not convey...
Página 99 - Mahometans, and one half of them are nearly in a savage state. The rest are in a barbarous condition. 8. The central parts of Africa abound in wild animals, such as lions, panthers, leopards, elephants, rhinoceroses, zebras, and quaggas. The woods are filled with chattering monkeys, the thickets are infested with monstrous serpents, ostriches roam over the deserts, various kinds of antelopes and deer in vast herds graze upon the plains, hippopotami are seen in the lakes and rivers, and crocodiles...
Página 16 - God had •determined to bring upon the earth at once, " the windows of heaven were opened, and the fountains of the great deep broken up.
Página 85 - Phoenicia, which lay along the border of the Mediterranean Sea ; it contained the cities of Tyre, Sidon, Ptolemais, and other celebrated places. In very early times, the Phoenicians were famous for taking the lead in commerce, navigation, and other arts. They were then an independent nation, but in after times their country became a province of Syria. 9. Syria is at the present day governed by the Turks, and like every other country under their sway, is stamped with an aspect of desolation and decay....
Página 217 - In dressing the bride, they never failed to divide her locks with the point of a spear, to signify that she was about to become the wife of a warrior. They then crowned her with a chaplet of flowers, and put on her a veil proper for the occasion.
Página 234 - At great entertainments the supper room was hung with flowers, and the guests were crowned with garlands. The floor was generally bare, though richly ornamented, and the ceiling was inlaid with a fretwork of gold and ivory. Scented oil was used for lighting the apartments, and massive carved lamps of figured bronze reflected their brilliancy on the gay and beautiful scene. , 12. Some of the more voluptuous and degraded of the Roman emperors, in the decay of the republic, were most extravagant and...

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