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ENTERED ACCORDING TO ACT OF CONGRyss, IN THE YEAR 1851, BY

SAMUEL CESTON,
IN THE CLERI'S OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE UNITED STATES FOR THE

SOUTHERN DISTRIOT OF NEW-YORK.

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I N D E X.

PAGE

A.

PAGE

Annihilator, 459 ; More Last Words African Legend, An. By Miss Mary E.

from CARL BENSON, 550 ; Under the TUTTLE...

13

Owl, Number One, 551; “ALBAN,' 636; Arundines Camí. By F. W. SHELTON.. 95 A Leaf from the Georgia Lawyer, Answered Prayer. By RUFUS HENRY

638; The Soul-Whisper' of Pine BACON..

132

Treer, 641; An Original Sketch by the Answer to Blackwood's Model Republic.. 205 Reverie' Bachelor, 642. Anacreontic Stanzas. By Dr. DICKSON... 210 Ashuelot River: A Song..

525

F. Affection's Tribute : Stanzas.

534 Adventoor on Coneyn Iland.

595 Fancies on Females. By a New Contributor, ...

16 B. Flattery, Friendship and Love..

130

Fair Boy LEONATUS, The. By R. H. StopBurial of FRAZER. By E. W. B. CANNING. 122 DARD....

535 Battle of Bu-hy Run. By F. PARKMAN, Jr. 153 Bridge and the Brook, The. By CHARLES

G, G. LELAND.

411 Birth day Tribute. By R. 8. Chilton..... 442 Glimpse of the World, A. By JAMES LINEN. 42

Gulf-Service, A Sketch of. By THE WAN-
C.
DERER..

112

Glance at the Past, Present and Future.... 138 Courtship and Marriage. From the Swed- Glimpses of Life in Florida during the ish of TEGNBR. 65 Seminole War..

214 Childhood and Manbood. By C.D. STUART. 151

Golden Dreams. By HENRY P. LELAND... 448 Contentment: A Fragment.. 349 Glimpse at the Sandwich Islands..

477 Crossing the Border. By SAMUEL S. Coxe,

Grave' Stanzas..

621 Esq...

504 Gossip with Readers and Correspondents, Cape Cottage at Sunset. By W. B. GLAZIER. 593

76, 169, 371, 460, 552, 644

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Don Quixote of Cervantes. By R. J. DE

Heart-Picture, A. By LILLY GRAHAM.... 59 CORDOVA..

189 Homeless, The: A Life-Sketch. By E. M. Death, A Few Thoughts on.

231
BOURNE...

211 Descent into the Rapids of Niagara.. 414 | Heavens, The: An Extract..

344 Dead, The: An Extract...

433 Hearts of Oak. By Caroline CurseDanville Cemetery: Stanzas. By W. H. C.

BRO'.

397, 515 HosMER. 417 Harvest of Life, The..

428 Dreadful Accident at the Bowery Theatre.

Harvest Moon, The. By the Peasant Bard. 443 By FRANCIS COPCUTT. 601 Household Clock, The...

594

E.

I.

Isle of Life: A Fragment....

512 Indian Maid, The. By E. PLURIBUS UNUM, Esq..........

541 J.

Eyes. Translated from the Swedish..... 20
Earth-Angels. By THEODORE S. Fay. 338
Epigram on a Scold..

364 Essay on Buckwheat Cakes.

390 Editor's TABLE.-A View from Telegraph

Hill, San Francisco, 74; North-American Review for the April quarter, 169; Miss CATHERINE HAYES, 363; Words of Wisdom from Afar, 370 ; Companions of my Solitude, a rare new book, 452; An Epistle to the Epitor by CARL BENSON, 456; Puillips's Firo

Jonn Bull in His Own Pastures. .... 125, 345
Journey of Life, The. By SIGMA......... 146
Jacobin of Paris, The...

513
K.
King James the Second ..

607

P.
PAGE.

PAGE.
LUCY: A Portrait....

Pagan questioning Death, The..

12
Lakes of New York, The. Cayuga: Codar Picture of Life and Death. By SIGMA..... 204
Heights....

20 Philosophical Sparrow, The.

By A, B,
Lakes of New York, The. Cayuga Bridge.. 221 JOHNSON, Esq......

234
Lines to a Berert ved Father...

224 Prairies: Lines written on. By WasHiNG-
Lines addressed to a Wife.
357 TON CHILTON...

526
Lines on the Death of an Only Son. By
Mrs. L. H SIGOURNEY.

380
Lines to One Unseen.

395
Life of Captain loun UNDERHILL, Ye.... 48 Quebec......

629
Lines on Revisiting Berkshire late in Au-
tumn. By WILLIAM Pitt PALMER... 615

R.
Low-born Squire's Unhappy Love, Ye... 434
Lines to the Greek Slave By Mrs. L. H. Reverie, A. By a New Ione..

27
SIGOURNEY..

436 Recluse, The. By RALPH SEAWULF...
La Bella Entristecida. By RICHARD Play- Rising with the Lark. By J. E. OTIS, 203
WARDE..

503 Rough Sketches of Female Figures...... 590
Lament fur Bishop ANDREWS. From the
Latin of Miltok. By Rev.J.G. Lyons,

s.
LL.D...

577
LITERARY Notices. — History of the Con- Stanzas : Repentance. By Hal..

18
spiracy of PONTIAC, 67; Para, or Scenes

Truth. By Miss A. C. CRAMBER-
and Adventures on the Amazon, 70;

LAIN..

48
BULWER and Forbes on Water Treat-

Duty: An Extract..

145
ment, 71; COGGESHAll's Voyages,

Star-Gazing

160
72; Wayside Flowers, 73; Memoirs of

The River..

427
WILLIAM WORDS WORTH, 161; Fresh

To My Wife.

502
Gleanings, 162; Inquiry into the Causes

Alone. By SIGMA.

599
of Natural Death, 163: GENEVRA or

By R. S. CHILTON.

622
the History of a Portrait, 164; Scenes Summer Rain. By E. M. BOURNE..

32
in our Parish, 166; Mexican Service Soul's Refuge, The. By Thomas Mackel-
Afloat and Ashore, 365 ; Popular Cy-

LAR

19
clopædia of Biblical Literature, 366; Sublime Porte, The. By J.P. BROWNE, Esq. 34
WÁre's Sketches of European Capi- Serinade. By CLARENCE Elwin.... 472
tals, 366 ; The Sea and the sailor, &c., Sequel to Saint Leger. By R. B KIMBALL,
449; Scenery and Mind, 450 ; Repor s

Esq.....

608, 444
of the New-York State Engineer and Sketches in South Africa. By MONTGOM-
Surveyor, 451; Lectures on the Lord's

ERY D. PARKER..

147, 571
Prayer, 451; Essays by RICHARD H. Song of the Mermaid, 'The .......

337
Dana, 542; Epoch of the Creation,

Summer Twilight: A Sonnet. By si NELL" 420
546; Outlines of a System of Mechani-

Seeking Dinner Under Difficulties. By
cal Philosophy, 547; The Ladies of the

FRANCIS COPCUTT.

493
Covenant, 549; History of Alabama, Some Account of SMITH...

537
632; Fallof Poland. 633; The Captains
Steadfastness.

589
of the Old World, 633; American Poe-

Sailor Boy's Death-Bed. By The War-
try, by A. B. STREET, 634; Swallow-

DERER..

608
Barn, 834; POTNAM's Home Cyclopæ- Schediasms. Lake Rye: A Summer's Day-

Dream.

616
M.

T.
Meister Karl's Sketch-Book. By CHARLES
G. LELAND...... 49, 134, 330, 43, 527, 622 The Two Roads. By llorace Rublee.... 152

The Three-fold Nature of Man: A Legend. 139
Minstrel's Curse, The. From the German

Things I Love. By CHARLES LELAND
of UHLAND.

121
PORTER...

223
MARIE LAFORET. By the author of Saint

The Two Fishermen. From the Greek.... 23
Leger....

358

Tyrants in Tartarus. By C. D. STUART.... 588
Music of the Dollars and the Dimes......

608
Thunder-Storm on the Tappuan Zee. By
N.
MARY E. HEWITT

628
Northern Scalds, The. By H. W. Ells-

V.
WORTH...

1
Nut-Shells : A Poem. By Rufus HENCY Vision of Crime: A Freak of Fancy....... 28
BACON..

350, 488
New Epire at Innisfield, The. By F. 11.

W.
UNDERWOOD...

579

Wissahicon, The. By R. T. MacOUN,
0.
U.S. N...

109

Wave and Wood, or Jack's Journal. By
Old-Time New-England Law-Suit......... 383 KIT KELVIN..

428

dia, 635.

412 Tribute, A

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The Scalds were the bards of the north, who, like the Celtic poets and Grecian rhapsodists, celebrated the history of gods and heroes. Like the composers of the Spanish romanceros,' they sung of glory and the battlefield. As did the Mennisingers, they too indulged in pride of ancestry, and walked by the side of earls and princes. Like Tailefero, the Norman troubadour, and Veit-Weter, the Swiss soldier, they personally mingled in the combats they described, fighting in the front rank of the battle.

The poetry of Scandinavia, like its history, dates from the migration of the Asiatic tribes, and is lost amid obscure tales or fabulous traditions. These tribes, so long called barbarous, exhibited nevertheless great veneration for poetry, which they attributed directly to the gods. They could well exclaim with Ovid :

"Est Deus in nobis, et sunt commencia cæli

Sedibusque ætheris spiritus ille venit.' Their tradition as to the origin of poetry, though abounding in absurdities, is yet strongly characteristic, and deserves a passing notice.

There was formerly a man called Kvaser, who became a god by his wisdom and intelligence. Two dwarfs, jealous of his reputation, slew him; and collecting his blood in a large vase, mingled it with honey. The blood of the sage, thus mixed with the virtue of flowers, became the source of poetry — the hipprocras of the Scandinavians. Whoever drank of it was immediately inspired, and capable of producing most harmonious tones upon the harp. The giant Sutting obtained this precious treasure, to which he attached a countless price, though he used it not, but gave it to the guardianship of his daughter Gunlæda, whom he shut up in a mountain. Meanwhile Odin, one of the chief gods,* was seized

* ELSEWHERE described as chief of the Scandinavian divinities. VOL. XXXVIII.

with a desire to add to his other attributes the power of poetry. To accomplish this, it was necessary to seduce Sutting, whom neither flattery nor promises could soften, and who, barbarian-like, without enjoying his treasure, kept it closely from all others. Odin quitted his celestial abode, and, like Apollo with Admetus, passed a summer at the home of Sutting, busied with the care of flocks and harvests. He demanded as a recompense a few drops of the poetic honey. These were peremptorily refused, and Odin, in despair of overcoming the obstinacy of the giant, had recourse to stratagem. Changing himself to a serpent, he penetrated the mountain which contained the goblet, and approached Gunlæda, whom he flattered with attentions. The poor Gunlæda, as Eve did also, believed the persuasions of the serpent, and forgot the trust committed by her father. Odin obtained permission to take three draughts from the goblet, and in so doing drained its contents. But he forgot the sweet vows he had murmured to Gunlæda, and leaving the poor girl in tears, flew away as an eagle, to which he had transformed himself. Sutting, however, was a skilful magician, and discovering the robbery, pursued the ravisher, whom he was about to seize. While Odin was trembling with the fear of paying dearly for his treachery, he was surrounded by the Asers — his celestial companions— presenting a large cup, into which he returned the mixture he had drank; though in the terror caused by Sutting, he suffered a few drops to fall upon the earth.* These constitute the beverage of inferior poets, who have only to embrace the earth for its attainment, while the goblet of the gods is preserved on high, beyond all reach but that of genius and true inspiration. Odin alone distributes from the goblet, and has hence become the god of poetry.t

In the reigns of the three earliest Scandinavian monarchs, we find nothing but incomplete references to the Scalds, and mere fragments of their productions. In the sixth and seventh centuries they occupy a distinct place in history, and from the ninth to the thirteenth follow in regular succession, with ample details as to their names, lives, and compositions. The reign of Harald of the Fair Hair' was the golden era of the Scalds. This ambitious monarch, for the purpose of adding more solemnity to his battles and greater glory to his conquests, surrounded himself with poets. He collected the most renowned Scalds at his court, whom he retained by costly presents and attentions, receiving in return their tributes to his power and greatness. His successors manifested similar tastes; and some, as Magnus the Good and Harald Sigurdson, were themselves composers.

The Scalds resisted for a long time the anathemas launched by the first missionaries of Christianity. Olaf the Saint condemned their mythological superstitions, yet regarded it as due to his royal dignity to have numerous Scalds in attendance at his court. It was he who, when going forth to battle, thus addressed them : ‘Place yourselves in the front rank of the army, that you may witness what you must describe, and do not receive the history from others.' Gradually, however, the spirit of Christianity was diffused amid the Northmen, and Scaldic poetry, the

* From respect to poets, the original expression has been somewhat softened.
+ BRAGA was generally regarded as the god of poetry.

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