Outlines of Composition: Designed to Simplify and Develop the Principles of the Art by Means of Exercises in the Preparation of Essays, Debates, Lectures, and Orations : for the Use of Schools, Colleges, and Private Students

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Robert S. Davis & Company, 1869 - 215 páginas

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Página 182 - How charming is divine Philosophy! Not harsh and crabbed, as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute, And a perpetual feast of nectared sweets, Where no crude surfeit reigns.
Página 201 - Tis the voice of the sluggard ; I heard him complain, " You have waked me too soon, I must slumber again." As the door on its hinges, so he on his bed, Turns his sides, and his shoulders, and his heavy head. "A little more sleep, and a little more slumber...
Página 200 - ... all remind us We can make our lives sublime, And, departing, leave behind us Footprints on the sands of Time, — Footprints that perhaps another, Sailing o'er life's solemn main, A forlorn and shipwrecked brother, Seeing, shall take heart again. Let us, then, be up and doing, With a heart for any fate ; Still achieving, still pursuing, Learn to labor and to wait.
Página 194 - The selfish heart deserves the pain it feels : More generous sorrow, while it sinks exalts, And conscious virtue mitigates the pang.
Página 110 - A beautiful eye makes silence eloquent, a kind eye makes contradiction an assent, an enraged eye makes beauty deformed. This little member gives life to every other part about us, and I believe the story of Argus implies no more, than that the eye is in every part; that is to say, every other part would be mutilated, were not its force represented more by the eye than even by itself.
Página 71 - Extol not riches, then, the toil of fools, The wise man's cumbrance, if not snare : more apt To slacken virtue, and abate her edge, Than prompt her to do aught may merit praise.
Página 102 - Let Fortune empty her whole quiver on me, I have a soul, that, like an ample shield, Can take in all, and verge enough for more.
Página 79 - Youth is not rich in time, it may be poor ; Part with it as with money, sparing ; pay No moment, but in purchase of its worth ; And what its worth, ask death-beds ; they can tell.
Página 173 - ... and purposes. Since the circulation of the blood has been found out, and many other great discoveries have been made by our modern anatomists, we see new wonders in the human frame, and discern several important uses for those parts, -which uses the ancients knew nothing of. In short, the body of man is such a subject as stands the utmost test of examination.
Página 83 - After- long use he shin'd ; for as the light Not only serves to show, but render us Mutually profitable ; so our lives In acts exemplary, not only win Ourselves good names, but do to others give Matter for virtuous deeds, by which we live.

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