Crowned Masterpieces of Literature that Have Advanced Civilization: As Preserved and Presented by the World's Best Essays, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Volumen7

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Ferd. P. Kaiser, Publishing Company, 1908

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Página 2568 - Let us then suppose the mind to be, as we say, white paper,* void of all characters, without any ideas; how comes it to be furnished? Whence comes it by that vast store which the busy and boundless fancy of man has painted on it with an almost endless variety? Whence has it all the materials of reason and knowledge? To this I answer in one word, from experience...
Página 2463 - His memory is odoriferous ; no clown curseth, while his stomach half rejecteth, the rank bacon ; no coalheaver bolteth him in reeking sausages ; he hath a fair sepulchre in the grateful stomach of the judicious epicure, and for such a tomb might be content to die.
Página 2589 - Firstly, our senses, conversant about particular sensible objects, do convey into the mind several distinct perceptions of things, according to those various ways wherein those objects do affect them: and thus we come by those ideas we have of yellow, white, heat, cold, soft, hard, bitter, sweet, and all those which we call sensible qualities...
Página 2582 - Nobody is made anything by hearing of rules, or laying them up in his memory ; practice must settle the habit of doing, without reflecting on the rule : and you may as well hope to make a good painter or musician extempore by a lecture and instruction in the arts of music and painting, as a coherent thinker, or strict reasoner, by a set of rules showing him wherein right reasoning consists.
Página 2465 - Whether, supposing that the flavour of a pig who obtained his death by whipping (per flagellationem extremam) superadded a pleasure upon the palate of a man more intense than any possible suffering we can conceive in the animal, is man justified in using that method of putting the animal to death ?
Página 2570 - Thirdly, In the state of nature there often wants power to back and support the sentence when right, and to give it due execution. They who by any injustice offended, will seldom fail where they are able by force to make good their injustice. Such resistance many times makes the punishment dangerous, and frequently destructive to those who attempt it.
Página 2463 - ... sweetness growing up to it —the tender blossoming of fat — fat cropped in the bud — taken in the shoot — in the first innocence — the cream and quintessence of the child-pig's yet pure food — the lean, no lean, but a kind of animal manna — or, rather, fat and lean (if it must be so) so blended and running into each other, that both together make but one ambrosian result or common substance. Behold him while he is doing — it seemeth rather a refreshing warmth, than a scorching...
Página 2754 - The father shall be divided against the son, and the son against the father; the mother against the daughter, and the daughter against the mother; the mother in law against her daughter in law, and the daughter in law against her mother in law.
Página 2461 - Eat, eat, eat the burnt pig, father, only taste — O Lord !" — with such-like barbarous ejaculations, cramming all the while as if he would choke. Ho-ti trembled in every joint while he grasped the abominable thing, wavering whether he should not put his son to death for an unnatural young monster, when the crackling scorching his fingers, as it had done his son's, and applying the same remedy to them, he in his turn tasted some of its flavor, which, make what sour mouths he would for a pretence,...
Página 2754 - ... the vanquished artist killed himself from mortification. Sir Walter Scott, in the same manner, has used those fragments of truth, which historians have scornfully thrown behind them, in a manner, which may well excite their envy. He has constructed, out of their gleanings, works which, even considered as histories, are scarcely less valuable than theirs. But a truly great historian would reclaim those materials which the novelist has appropriated.

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