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which budded only in this unfriendly climate, will open in the eternal sunshine with life which cannot decay; with beauty which will never fade; and with fragrance which will cheer heaven itself through its immortal ages. Then those who have voluntarily done good even to the least of Christ's brethren, will be declared to have done it unto him, and will inherit the kingdom prepared for his followers from the foundation of the world. At the same time, also, those who have refused or neglected this divine employment, will be compelled, with amazement and terror, to depart from his presence into everlasting fire, prepared for the devil and his angels. It ought to sink deep into the heart of every one of us, that no reason is alleged at the final trial for this immense difference in the future allotments of men, but that some have chosen, and that others have declined to employ their time and talents in accomplishing this glorious object. The former are admitted into heaven, not indeed as having merited this divine destination, but as being qualified for active and endless beneficence; the latter are shut out, because they are unfitted to pursue this illustrious end of their being.

service of God, and the happiness and virtue of their fellow men, will be found to have done more than a host of the rich, the great, and the splendid. Let no person, therefore, feel as if this divine employment was beyond his power.

Were this equitable standard 'for estimating the characters of men universally adopted, what mighty changes would be made in human reputation? How often would the man of science, who consumes his life in heaping up knowledge without employing it to any useful purpose, be obliged to give place to the clown who has never known his alphabet, and who, yet, in his own humble sphere, has laboured for the relief and the comfort of those around him ? How often would beauty of form fade away before the superior lustre of a virtuous mind, animating, perhaps, a plain, or even a deformed person? How frequently would the tongue of eloquence falter and be dumb, before the silent but impressive language of a benevolent life, in a humble man, who had talents for doing good ? How suddenly, as well as frequently, would the wreath of the statesman, and the laurel of the hero wither before the crown of glory achieved by a peasant; whom the one ruled with a rod of iron, and the other butchered, perhaps, to swell his power and fame! In a word, how soon would many of the great become little; the renowned be forgotten; the splendid sink into obscurity; and kings, and princes, and nobles, and all those proud men whom we foolishly account happy, exchange the palace for a cottage, or the throne for a dunghill ?

In the day when “ God shall bring every work into judg

ment, with every secret thing, whether it be good or whether “ it be evil,” changes of this nature, endless in their multitude, and immensely important in their alternations of disgrace and glory, will actually take place. Then those who are last in this world will in many instances be first; and those who are first will in many instances be last. Then those only who have done good will rise to the resurrection of life: while those who have done evil will rise to the resurrection of condemnation. Their pride and fame, wealth and grandeur, will fade and wither beneath the beams of the sun of righteousness. Then, too, the benevolence of the Gospel; which budded only in this unfriendly climate, will open in the eternal sunshine with life which cannot decay; with beauty which will never fade ; and with fragrance which will cheer heaven itself through its immortal ages. Then those who have voluntarily done good even to the least of Christ's brethren, will be declared to have done it unto him, and will inherit the kingdom prepared for his followers from the foundation of the world. At the same time, also, those who have refused or neglected this divine employment, will be compelled, with amazement and terror, to depart from his presence into everlasting fire, prepared for the devil and his angels. It ought to sink deep into the heart of every one of us, that no reason is alleged at the final trial for this immense difference in the future allotments of men, but that some have chosen, and that others have declined to employ their time and talents in accomplishing this glorious object. The former are admitted into heaven, not indeed as having merited this divine destination, but as being qualified for active and endless beneficence; the latter are shut out, because they are unfitted to pursue this illustrious end of their being.

SERMON XVIII.

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ON A PROFESSIONAL LIFE.

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? To the Candidates for the Baccalaureate, in 1796 and 1805.

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PROV. iv. 20—27.

My son, attend to my words ; incline thine ear to my say

ings. Let them not depart from thine eyes; keep them in the midst

of thine heart; For they are life unto those that find them, and health to all

their flesh. Keep thy heart with all diligence, for out of it are the issues

of life. Put away from thee a froward mouth, and perverse lips put

far from thee. Let thine eyes look right on, and thine eyelids look straight

before thee. Ponder the path of thy feet, and let all thy ways be esta

blished. Turn not to the right hand, nor to the left; remove thy foot

from evil.

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THESE words are a part of the instructions given by David to Solomon; of a great and wise prince to a promising son. The character of the father has been rarely excelled; his instructions never. The influence, which they had on the son, was of the happiest kind; and their tendency to profit all men was such, that God, who had originally given them to the fa... ther, thought proper to record them in the sacred Canon for universal use. Thus recommended, they cannot fail to have weight on the present occasion.

In this paragraph the following things are plainly and especially urged on Solomon.

1. That he should faithfully observe the precepts of his father, verses 20–22.

2. That he should keep his heart with all diligence; that he should watch carefully over his thoughts and affections; as being the springs of action, and the true source of a good or evil character, verse 23.

3. That he should, in like manner, watch over his lips; and take effectual care not to be snared by the words of his mouth,

verse 24.

4. That he should examine the course of life before him with seriousness and diligence; and determine coolly and cautiously beforehand concerning all his conduct, verses 25 and 26.

5. That, when he had thus considered his course of life, and determined on what was right and proper to be pursued, he should closely adhere to his determination.

On the present occasion I stand as a father to the youths whom I am now to address. Through the past year they have been wholly committed to my parental care; and are now to receive my last parental office. The solemn and interesting nature of the occasion will, I presume, apologize for me, if I confine my observations wholly to them. I wish to say many things to them; but all that I can ever say to most of them must probably be said at the present time.

Without further preface, let me, then, young gentlemen, my pupils, my children, endeared to me by many affecting considerations, address to you the following counsels. I trust you will find them, though not the counsels of your real parents, nor of a wise and inspired prince, yet the sentiments of a sincere friends and sentiments accordant with inspired truth. One interesting circumstance will certainly attend them, they

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