The Beginnings of the American Revolution: Based on Contemporary Letters, Diaries, and Other Documents, Volumen3

Portada
Baker and Taylor, 1910

Dentro del libro

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 199 - O unexpected stroke, worse than of death ! Must I thus leave thee, Paradise? thus leave Thee, native soil, these happy walks and shades, Fit haunt of gods? where I had hope to spend, Quiet though sad, the respite of that day That must be mortal to us both.
Página 199 - With what to sight or smell was sweet ! from thee How shall I part, and whither wander down Into a lower world ; to this obscure And wild ? how shall we breathe in other air Less pure, accustomed to immortal fruits ? Whom thus the Angel interrupted mild.
Página 377 - In our own native land, in defence of the freedom that is our birth-right, and which we ever enjoyed till the late violation of, it — for the protection of our property, acquired solely by the!
Página 367 - I do hereby in his majesty's name, offer and promise his most gracious pardon, to all persons who shall forthwith lay down their arms, and return to the duties of peaceable subjects, excepting only from the benefit of such pardon, SAMUEL ADAMS and JOHN HANCOCK, whose offences are of too flagitious a nature to admit of any other consideration than that of condign punishment.
Página 375 - This is a family quarrel between us and Old England. You Indians are not concerned in it. We don't wish you to take up the hatchet against the king's troops. We desire you to remain at home, and not join on either side, but keep the hatchet buried deep.
Página 315 - Unhappy it is, though, to reflect, that a brother's sword has been sheathed in a brother's breast, and that the once happy and peaceful plains of America are either to be drenched with blood or inhabited by slaves. Sad alternative ! But can a virtuous man hesitate in his choice ? I am with sincere regard, and affectionate compliments to Mrs.
Página 377 - We are reduced to the alternative of choosing an unconditional submission to the tyranny of irritated ministers, or resistance by force. The latter is our choice. We have counted the cost of this contest, and find nothing so dreadful as voluntary slavery.
Página 55 - By the rude bridge that arched the flood, Their flag to April's breeze unfurled, Here once the embattled farmers stood, And fired the shot heard round the world. The foe long since in silence slept; Alike the conqueror silent sleeps; And Time the ruined bridge has swept Down the dark stream which seaward creeps. On this green bank, by this soft stream, We set to-day a votive stone; That memory may their deed redeem, When...
Página 298 - To all friends of American liberty be it known that this Morning before break of day, a brigade consisting of about 1000 or 1200 men landed at Phip's farm at Cambridge, and marched to Lexington, where they found a company of our colony militia in arms, upon whom they fired without any provocation, and killed six men and wounded four others.
Página 54 - Concord we found very few inhabitants in the town ; those we met with both Major Pitcairn and myself took all possible pains to convince that we meant them no injury, and that if they opened their doors when required to search for military stores, not the slightest mischief would be done. We had opportunities of convincing them of our good intentions, but they were sulky ; and one of them even struck Major Pitcairn.

Información bibliográfica