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. Now. Publishing, the cheapest and best Series of Educational Books ever issued, entitled ILLUSTRATED TWO-PENNY SCHOOL BOOKS,

DIVIDED INTO THE FOLLOWING SERIES :1. FIRST SPELLING AND READING.

7. GEOLOGY. 2. SECOND SPELLING AND READING.

8. ASTRONOMY. 3. GRADUATED GRAMMAR.

9. NATURAL HISTORY. 4. WRITING AND COMPOSITION.

10. ENGLISH HISTORY. 5. ARITHMETIC.

11. PHYSICAL TRAINING. 6. GEOGRAPHY,

12. MORAL CULTURE. Forming Vol. 1., price 1s. 60.

Forming Vol. II., price 1s. 6d.
The Numbers may be had separately, price 2d., and the Numbers and Volumes will always

be kept in print.
London : HOUlston and STONEMAN, 65, Paternoster Row; and all Booksellers.

In the Press, and shortly will be Published, price 2d. each, ILLUSTRATED TWO-PENNY HOUSEHOLD BOOKS. 1. CARVING AND COOKERY.

7. BEES, POULTRY, PIGS, COWS, &c. 2. PICKLING, POTTING, & PRESERVING.

8. GARDENING. 3. CLOTHING.

9. DOMESTIC PETS. 4. HEALTH AND MEDICINE.

10. HOUSEHOLD MANIPULATION. 5. THE TOILETTE.

11. DOMESTIC FINE ARTS. 6. DYEING, CLEANING, POLISHING, &e. I 12. MANAGEMENT OF CHILDREN. These Twelve Numbers, bound into One Volume, will comprise a work which no housewife should

be without.
Each Plumber will be Illustrated by rrrellent Wood Engravings.
UNIFORM WITH THE ILLUSTRATED TWO-PENNY SCHOOL BOOKS.

London: J. Bennett, 69, Fleet Street; and all Booksellers. .

GRANDFATHER WHITEHEAD'S CATECHISMS. GRANDFATHER WHITEHEAD has much pleasure in submitting to his numerous Friends a SERIES of CATECHISMS, designed to make the acquirement of Useful Knowledge by the Young, and by Beginners of all ages, easy and pleasing. These Catechisms will appear in the following order :1. NATURAL PHILOSOPHY-ELEMENTARY 7. VEGETABLE PHYSIOLOGY & BOTANY. PRINCIPLES.

8. ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY & ANATOMY. 2. NATURAL HISTORY – PRINCIPLES OF 9. ZOOLOGY. CLASSIFICATION,

10. ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICAL GEOGRA3. MECHANICS.

PHY. 4. CHEMISTRY.

11. GEOLOGY AND METALLURGY. 5. ELECTRICITY, OPTICS, AND ACOUSTICS. 12. LOCOMOTION, ARTS, MANUFACTURES, 6. PNEUMATICS, HYDRAULICS, &c.

SANATORÝ IMPROVEMENTS, &c. &c. Each subject will be treated with the utmost care ; especial attention being paid to the latest discoveries of facts and principles of Science. The Catechisms will therefore supply, when finished, a work eminently adapted by its cheppness, simplicity, and completeness, to promote the diffusion of Useful Knowledge in Schools, and in Domestic Circles. The Volume will be ready at the close of the year, price 28. 6d., elegantly bound.

London: HOUlston and STONEMAN, 65, Paternoster Row; and all Booksellers.

Now Ready, price 2d. each,
AUNT MARY'S STORY-BOOKS FOR YOUNG

PEOPLE.

1. THE COMICAL HISTORY AND TRAGICAL END OF REYNARD THE FOX.
2. THE LIFE AND SURPRISING ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE.
3. STORIES OF FOREIGN COUNTRIES. FIRST SERIES.
4. STORIES OF FOREIGN COUNTRIES.-SECOND SERIES.
5. STORIES OF ANIMALS,- FIRST SERIES-QUADRUPEDS.

6. STORIES OF ANIMALS.-SECOND SERIES-BIRDS. These STORY-BOOKS may be had separately, or bound in One neat Volume, price 1s. 6d.

London: HOULSTON and STONEMAN, 65, Paternoster Row; and all Booksellers.

COMPLETE.

COMPLETE

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FIRST BOOK OF SPELLING AND READING

SUGGESTIONS TO TEACHERS. A common mode of teaching a child the letters of the alphabet has been to point em all out in succession, until they were remembered by the child in their consecutive der. This is a slow and unsatisfactory method. The impression of each letter on e mind is erased by that which is shown next. A better way is to call the child's tention to only one or two letters at a lesson, give their sounds very distinctly, speak sout their appearance, and let him look at them until he can distinguish them, and ll their sounds or names. The following plan will be found to be quite original, and ; results will afford the greatest satisfaction. Cut out the large letters from this book, id, putting them a little distance off, send the child to fetch A, or N, or W, as you may termine. After a little while you may proceed to amuse and instruct the child by itting the letters down upon objects, of the names of which the letters form the initials. hus: put T on the Table, and say,

" The T is on something that's spelt with a T;

Look about, look about, and bring it to me.The child will be amused to seek and find the letter, and will learn to distinguish ot only the letter T, but to understand that the piece of furniture from which he took le letter is called a Table, and that its name begins with a T.

This simple couplet will serve to rhyme with the letters B, C, D, E, G, P, and V; ad the letters may be placed variously upon the Bed, a Board, a Basket; a Chair, il up, a Cradle; a Door, a Dresser, a Drugget, a Desk, Dimity; an Ear, an Egg or Eggip; a Glove, a Glass, Gauze, Gooseberry; a Pitcher, a Poker, a Plum, a Pie or Pieish, a Pudding, a Penny, Paper, &c.; a Vine-leaf, a Vegetable, Velvet, a Vase, &c. &c. Then anything nice turns up, as a prize, it will prove a reward. The following couplets will include the rest of the alphabet :

" There's an A upon something that's spelt with an A;

Look about, look about, bring the letter this way !" The letter may have been put upon an Apron, on the teacher's Arm, an Acorn, or pple. This couplet will serve also for K and J. The K may be placed upon a Key, a ite, a Knob of a door; and the J upon a Jar, a Joint (of á table), a Jug, Jean, Jane, ohn-it being proper, when the letter is placed upon a person, to say some one, instead f some-thing.

"There's an F upon something begins with an F;

Go find it-you hear me-I know you're not deaf !" The letter may be placed upon a Footstool, a Fan, a Fender, a Fire-screen, a Flower, le Floor, Flannel, the teacher's Foot, &c.

“ There's an H upon something that's spelt with an H;

And, that if you try, you are able to reach The letter may be placed on the Hearth-rug, a Hand, the Head of the teacher, Hat, &c.

" There's an L upon something that's spelt with an L;

Look about, look about, till its place you can tell!” The letter may be placed on the Lock or Latch of a door, on a Leg, a Lemon, a ottuce, Lace, Lead, Leather, &c.

There's an M upon something that's spelt with a

I've some letters here, so put it with them !" The letter may be placed upon a Mat, a Mantle, upon Mamma, a Man, Metal, &c.

“ There's an N upon something that's spelt with an N;

Look about, look about, till you find it again !"

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2 Learning is wealth to the poor, and an ornament to the rich.

The letter may be placed upon the teacher's Neck, upon the Nurse, a Nut Nutmeg, &c.

• There's an O upon something that's spelt with an 0;

To bring it to me,-I will thank you to go.” The letter may be placed upon an Orange, an Onion, an Oil-cloth, Ormolu, Ottoman, &c.

“ There's a Q upon something that's spelt with a Q;

Look about till you find it, and bring it here too !" The letter may be placed upon a Quill, a Quilt, a Quadruped (the cat, or dog), &

“ There's an R upon something that's spelt with an R;

Go fetch it for me, it is not very far !" The letter may be placed upon a Radish, a Ring, a Rug, a Raisin, a Raspber Rice, a Ribbon, &c.

“ There's an S upon something begins with an S;

What that something is, I will leave you to guess ?” The letter may be put upon a Stool, a Saucer, a Sock or Stocking, a Stone, a S (piece of music), Satin, Scissors, Seat, Shoe, Silk, Spoon, Sugar, &c.

“ There's a U upon something that's spelt with a U;

Look about, look about, you will find it is true!”
The letter may be put upon an Umbrella, an Urn, upon Uncle's lap, &c.

“ There's a Won something that's spelt with a W;

Look about for it, I hope I don't trouble you !". The letter may be put by the Window, on a Work-box, on a Wardrobe, against Wall, upon a piece of Wood, on some Worsted, &c. The following may serve an existing difficulty, and the variety may amuse the child

" There's nothing about us that's spelt with an X;

So I'll show it to you-I've no wish to perplex !"
“ There's a Y that's on something that's spelt with a Y;

So to find it I'd have you immediately try."
The letter may be placed upon a Yard-stick, anything Yellow, or on a Youth.

“ In finding these letters, you'll smile when 'tis said;

You've pleased me by something that's spelt with a Z.” Explain to the child that he has displayed Zeal, and this will afford you a suital opportunity to encourage him to the zealous pursuit of knowledge, which may bet more impressed upon him by pleasing remarks about the different objects from whi he took the letters. By this system even infants may be instructed in the forms letters, and in their proper sounds; for each couplet (with the exception of H) has be formed to rhyme upon the exact sound of the letter. There are few adult persons : will admit that simple rhymes are musical to children, and that they impress the mi very vividly. We all remember

" Ride a cock-horse to Banbury Cross,

To see an old woman get up on her horse." Here was a bit of doggrell without rhyme or purpose, for horse can scarcely be si to rhyme with cross; and yet how many delighted children have listened to it on and over again. All the faculties of the child will be brought into operation by tl system, which will not be less interesting than the well-known game of

“ The beans are buttered, and very well buttered indeed !” The letters having been carefully cut out, the small ones being allowed to rem underneath, the learner may afterwards be exercised in placing them back in th proper situations. The whole of the alphabet being printed to fall upon one surfi this will be found easily practicable.

We have discarded the irrational infliction upon the child of the unmeaning uncongenial sounds of syllables, such as “ak, ek, ik, ok, uk,” and “ba, be, bi, bo, &c., which we find in Markham's “Plain and Easy Method," and similar errors Guy, Fenning, Mavor, &c.; and prefer, after imparting a knowledge of the alphal to introduce the child to such simple words as may be already familiar to his ear, a as he may require to utter immediately his lessons are at an end.

It is good to know much, but better to make good use of what we know.

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