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NATIONAL EDUCATION. Now Publishing, the cheapest and best Series of Educational Books ever issued, entitled ILLUSTRATED. TWO-PENNY SCHOOL BOOKS,

DIVIDED INTO THE FOLLOWING SERIES :- . 1. FIRST SPELLING AND READING.

7. GEOLOGY.. 2. SECOND SPELLING AND READING.

8. ASTRONOMY. 3. GRADUATED GRAMMAR.

9. NATURAL HISTORY. 4. WRITING AND COMPOSITION.

10. ENGLISH HISTORY. 5. ARITHMETIO.

11. PHYSICAL TRAINING. 6. GEOGRAPHY.

12. MORAL CULTURE, Forming Vol. I., price 1s. Bd.

Forming Vol. II., price ls. 6d.
The Numbers may be had separately, price 2d., and the Numbers and volumes will always

be kept in print.
London : HOULSTON and STONEMAN, 65, Paternoster Row; and all Booksellers.

In the Press, and shortly will be Published, price 2d. eack, ILLUSTRATED TWO-PENNY HOUSEHOLD BOOKS. 1. CARVING AND COOKERY.

7. BEES, POULTRY, PIGS, COWS, &c. 2. PICKLING, POTTING, & PRESERVING.

8. GARDENING. 8, CLOTHING.

9. DOMESTIC PETS. 4. HEALTH AND MEDICINE,

10. HOUSEHOLD MANIPULATION. 5. THE TOILETTE.

11. DOMESTIC FINE ARTS. 6. DYEING, CLEANING, POLISHING, &c. I 12. MANAGEMENT OF CHILDREN. These Twelve Numbers, bound into One Volume, will comprise a work which no housewife should

be without.
Farh Plumber will be Illustrated by rzrellrut Wand Engravings.
AS UNIFORM WITH THE ILLUSTRATED TWO-PENNY SCHOOL BOOKS.

London: J. BENNETT, 69, Fleet Street; and all Booksellers. i

GRANDFATHER WHITEHEAD'S CATECHISMS. GRANDFATHER WHITEHEAD has much pleasure in submitting to his numerous Friends a SERIES of CATECHISMS, designed to make the acquirement of Useful Knowledge by the Young, and by Beginners of all ages, easy and pleasing. These Catechisms will appear in the following order :1. NATURAL PHILOSOPHY-ELEMENTARY 7. VEGETABLE PHYSIOLOGY & BOTANY. PRINCIPLES.

8. ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY & ANATOMY. 2. NATURAL HISTORY – PRINCIPLES OF 9. ZOOLOGY. CLASSIFICATION..

10. ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICAL GEOGRA3. MECHANICS,

PHY. 4. CHEMISTRY.

11. GEOLOGY AND METALLURGY. 5. ELECTRICITY, OPTICS, AND ACOUSTICS. 12. LOCOMOTION, ARTS, MANUFACTURES, 6. PNEUMATICS, HYDRAULICS, &c.

SANATORY IMPROVEMENTS, &c. &c. Each subject will be treated with the utmost care; especial attention being paid to the latest discoveries of facts and principles of Science. The Catechisms will therefore supply, when finished, a work eminently adapted by its cheapness, simplicity, and completeness, to promote the diffusion of Useful Knowledge in Schools, and in Domestic Circles, The Volume will be ready at the close of the year, price 28. 6d., elegantly bound. London: HOULSTON and STONEMAN, 65, Paternoster Row; and all Booksellers.

Now Ready, price 2d. each,

AUNT MARY'S STORY-BOOKS FOR YOUNG

PEOPLE.

PLETE,

1. THE COMICAL HISTORY AND TRAGICAL END OF I YNARD THE FOX.
2. THE LIFE AND SURPRISING ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE.
3. STORIES OF FOREIGN COUNTRIES.-FIRST SERIES.
4. STORIES OF FOREIGN COUNTRIES.-SECOND SERIES.
5. STORIES OF ANIMALS. FIRST SERIES-QUADRUPEDS.

6. STORIES OF ANIMALS.-SECOND SERIES-BIRDS. These STORY-BOOKS may be had separately, or bound in One neat Volume, price 18.6d.

London: HOUSTON and STONEMAN, 65, Paternoster Row; and all Booksellers.

COMPLETE.

The best mode of instruction is to practice what we teach.

33.

SECOND BOOK OF SPELLING AND READING.

PRACTICAL HINTS TO TEACHERS. It has often and justly been observed, that very few persons read well. To read simply and naturally, with animation and expression, is indeed a high and rare attainment. To obtain a correct pronunciation, a proper tone of voice, and the right inflections, such as will convey clearly to the minds of those who listen the real sentiments and ideas which the writer intended should be conveyed, is a degree of perfection in the art of reading that few, very few, ever arrive at.

Besides, what is by many called good reading, is far from it. We mean that which calls the attention of the listener from the subject of the discourse, to the supposed taste and skill in pronouncing it. As the best window is that through which the light passes most freely, and affords the most natural view of the landscape without, so is he the best reader who brings before us the mind of the author, unencumbered by the tints and tracery of his own style and manner. Still, it must be remembered that with most persons reading is AN ART. The best readers are those who have most diligently studied their art; and yet studied it so well that you can scarcely perceive that they have studied it at all. You so thoroughly understand, and so sensibly feel the force of what they read, that you never think how they are saying it.

- It is during the early training of children that the greatest fault in teaching reading prevails. Bad habits then formed are exceedingly difficult to get rid of. But as teachers will not only have scholars who have not been taught at all, but those who have been taught badly, the inquiry naturally arises, “How can we make good readers of those who now read badly, as well as those who cannot read at all ?” In reply we give a few rules, which, if observed, will be of much service in suggesting modes of teaching reading successfully.

Be sure that the pupil thoroughly understands what he reads. Probably there can be no one direction given, which is of more importance, especially in teaching children, than this. Attention to it will sweep away those unmeaning combinations before alluded to, such as “blo, blu, dac, hec," and all the rest of this unsuitable tribe, found in nearly every Spelling-book. It is in reading these that a habit is formed of separating the sight and sound of words from the sense; and this habit, once formed, clings to the mind long after the years of childhood have passed away.

Remember that the tones and emphasis which we use in conversation are those which form the basis of GOOD ELOCUTION. Children should therefore be instructed to read as they talk'; particularly in regard to emphasis and inflection. But there are some children who talk so badly that they can scarcely be understood. This is owing to defects in articulation. To remove this habit, we know of no better way than thorough drilling in uttering the elementary sounds of the language. This may be practised, at first, by the class in concert, then by each pupil singly.

One ill example spoils many good precepts.

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