A View of Society and Manners in Italy: With Anecdotes Relating to Some Eminent Characters, Volumen2

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W. Strahan; and T. Cadell, 1781
 

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Página 59 - Wilt thou upon the high and giddy mast Seal up the ship-boy's eyes, and rock his brains In cradle of the rude imperious surge, And in the visitation of the winds, Who take the ruffian billows by the top, Curling their monstrous heads, and hanging them With deafening clamour in the slippery clouds, That, with the hurly, death itself awakes...
Página 58 - O gentle sleep, Nature's soft nurse, how have I frighted thee, That thou no more wilt weigh my eyelids down, And steep my senses in forgetfulness...
Página 59 - And hush'd with buzzing night-flies to thy slumber, Than in the perfum'd chambers of the great, Under the canopies of costly state, And lull'd with sounds of sweetest melody?
Página 59 - Canst thou, O partial sleep! give thy repose To the wet sea-boy in an hour so rude; And, in the calmest and most stillest night, With all appliances and means to boot, Deny it to a king ? Then, happy low, lie down ! Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.
Página 46 - Theinftantheappearedj the mtific ftruck up, the bells rung from every church, and the cannon thundered from the caftle of St. Angelo, in repeated peals. During the intervals, the church of St. Peter's, the palace of the Vatican, and the banks of the Tiber, re-echoed the acclamations of the populace. At length his Holinefs arofe from his feat, and an immediate and awful filence enfued.
Página 293 - People of fafhion generally drive through this paffage with torches, but the country people and foot paflengers find their way without much difficulty by the light which enters at the extremities, and at two holes pierced through the mountain near the middle of the grotto, which admit light from above.
Página 479 - Nay, do not think I flatter; For what advancement may I hope from thee, That no revenue hast but thy good spirits To feed and clothe thee? Why should the poor be flatter'd? No; let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee Where thrift may follow fawning.
Página 494 - And he will be a wild man; and his hand will be against every man, and every man's hand against him; and he shall dwell in the presence of all his brethren.
Página 500 - Caelum non animum mutant qui trans mare currunt. Strenua nos exercet inertia : navibus atque Quadrigis petimus bene vivere. Quod petis hic est, Est Ulubris, animus si te non deficit aequus.
Página 100 - Goddess, and queen, to whom the powers belong Of dreadful magic, and commanding song. Some God directing, to this peaceful bay Silent we came, and melancholy lay, Spent and o'erwatch'd. Two days and nights roll'd on, And now the third succeeding morning shone.

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