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Preliminary.

United States upon the high seas and in all waters connected therewith, navigable by sea-going vessels.

In the following rules every steam-vessel which is under sail and not under steam is to be considered a sailing-vessel, and every vessel under steam, whether under sail or not, is to be considered a steam-vessel.

The word "steam-vesselshall include any vessel propelled by machinery.

A vessel is under waywithin the meaning of these rules when she is not at anchor, or made fast to the shore, or aground.

Aug. 19, 1890, RULES CONCERNING LIGHTS, AND SO FORTH. regulations for preventing colli. Bions at sea, as The word “visible” in these rules when applied to lights amended by the acts of May 28, shall mean visible on a dark night with a clear. atmosphere. 1894, Aug.13, 1894, and June 10, 1896, ARTICLE 1. The rules concerning lights shall be complied and proclaimed with in all weathers from sunset to sunrise, and during such o the United time no other lights which may be mistaken for the prescribed States to take

lights shall be exhibited. effectJuly 1, 1897.

Material ART. 2. A steam-vessel when under way shall carry-(a) changes from On or in front of the foremast, or if a vessel without a forecated by italics. mast, then in the fore part of the vessel, at a height above Seo notes i and the hull of not less than twenty feet, and if the breadth of 2.

the vessel exceeds twenty feet, then at a height above the hull not less than such breadth, so, houerer, that the light need not be carried at a greater height above the hull than forty feet, a bright white light, so constructed as to show an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of twenty points of the compass, so fixed as to throw the light ten points on each side of the vessel, namely, from right ahead to two points abaft the beam on either side, and of such a character as to be visible at a distance of at least five miles.

(b) On the starboard side a green light so constructed as to show an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of ten

Note 1.-The attention of all persone concerned is invited to the changes in the rules relating to lights, steering and sailing, etc., embodied in the act, as amended, to adopt regulations for preventing collisions at sea, approved August 19, 1890, and proclaimed by the President, to tako effect July 1, 1897.

On and after July 1, 1897, these rules aro to bo followed by all public and private vessels of the United States upon the high seas and in all waters connected therewith navigable by seagoing vessels, except upon harbors, rivers, and inland waters, and upon the Great Lakes and their tributary waters as far east as Montreal.

Material changes from former acts are indicated by italics.

Amendinents to the act are shown by a statement of the date of the passage of the amendment.

Article 9 of the act, relating to fishing vessels, was repealed May 28, 1894, and Congress by an act approved August 13, 1894, reenacted article 10 of the International Regulations of 1885, now in force, so far as said article relates to lights for fishing vessels. It is inserted, therefore, as reenacted, in place of article 9, repealed, of the act of August 19, 1890.

The laws to prevent collisions upon the harborg, rivers, and inland waters of the
United States and those relating to the Great Lakes follow.

Note :--Regulations for preventing collisions at sea were adopted by act of 1885,
March 3, ch. 354 (33 Stat. L., 438), piodifying R. S., sec. 4233.

By act of 1890, Aug. 19, ch. 802 (1 Supp. R. S., 781), new regulations were substituted

These are amended by the above act of 1894. When act takes By sec. 3 of the act of 1890 (1 Supp, R. S., 789), the act was not to take effect until effect.

a time to be fixed by proclamation of the President. The proclamation of the Presi. dent was issued on July 13, 1894 (28 Stat. L., p. 1250), fixing the first day of March, 1895, as the day on which the act of 1890, as amended by the above act of 1894, is to tako effect.

But by 1895, Feb. 23, ch. 127, and proclamation issued in accordance therewith, the taking offect of the act of 1890 is postponed to a date to be hereafter fixed by the President. (See, as to lights on fishing vessels, 1894, Aug. 13, ch. 284, and note.)

points of the compass, so fixed as to throw the light from right ahead to two points abaft the beam on the starboard side, and of such a character as to be visible at a distance of at least two miles.

(c) On the port side a red light so constructed as to show an unbroken light over an are of the horizon of ten points of the compass, so fixed as to throw the light from right ahead to two points abaft the beam on the port side, and of such a character as to be visible at a distance of at least two miles.

(d) The said green and red side-lights shall be fitted with inboard screens projecting at least three feet forward from the light, so as to prevent these lights from being seen across the bow.

(0) A steam-vessel when under way may carry an additional white light similar in construction to the light mentioned in subdivision (a). These two lights shall be 80 placed in line with the keel that one shall be at least fifteen feet higher than the other, and in such a position with reference to each other that the lower light shall be forward of the upper one.

The vertical distance between these lights shall be less than the hori. zontal distance.

ART. 3. A steam-vessel when towing another vessel shall, in addition to her side-lights, carry two bright white lights in a vertical line one over the other, not less than six feet apart, and when towing more than one vessel shall carry an additional bright white light six feet above or below such light, if the length of the towo measuring from the stern of the towing vessel to the stern of the last vessel towed exceeds six hundred feet. Each of these lights shall be of the same construction and character, and shall be carried in the same position as the white light mentioned in article two (a), excepting the additional light, which may be carried at a height of not less than fourteen feet above the hull.

Such steam-vessel may carry a small white light abast the funnel or aftermast for the vessel towed to steer by, but such light shall not be visible forward of the beam.

ART. 4. (a) A vessel which from any accident is not under command shall carry at the same height as a white light mentioned in article two (a), where they can best be seen, and if a steam-vessel in lieu of that light, two red lights, in a vertical line one over the other, not less than six feet apart, and of such a character as to be visible all around the hori. zon at a distance of at least two miles; and shall by day carry in a vertical line one over the other, not less than six feet apart, where they can best be seen, two black balls or shapes, each two feet in diameter.

(b) A vessel employed in laying or in picking up a telegraph cable shall carry in the same position as the white light mentioned in article two (a), and if a steam-vessel in lieu of that light, three lights in a vertical line one over the other not less than six feet apart. The highest and lowest of these lights shall be red, and the middle light shall be white, and they shall be of such a character as to be visible all around the horizon, at a distance of at least two miles.

By day she shall carry in a vertical line, one over the other, not less than six feet apart, where they can best be seen,

three shapes not less than two feet in diameter, of which the highest and lowest shall be globular in shape and red in color, and the middle one diamond in shape and white.

(c) The ressels referred to in this article, when not making way through the water, shall not carry the side-lights, but when making way shall carry them.

(d) The lights and shapes required to be shown by this article are to be taken by other vessels as signals that the vessel showing them is not under command and can not therefore get out of the way.

These signals are not signals of vessels in distress and requiring assistance. Such signals are contained in article thirty-one.

ART. 5. A sailing vessel under way and any vessel being towed shall carry the same lights as are prescribed by article two for a steam-ressel under way, with the exception of the white lights mentioned therein, which they shaîl never carry.

ART. 6. Whenever, as in the case of small vessels under way during bad weather, the green and red side-lights can not be fixed, these lights shall be kept at hand, lighted and ready for use; and shall, on the approach of or to other vessels, be exhibited on their respective sides in sufficient time to prevent collision, in such manier as to make them most vis. ible, and so that the green light shall not be seen on the port side nor the red light on the starboard side, nor, if practicable, more than two points abaft the beam on their respective sides.

To make the use of these portable lights more certain and easy the lanterns containing them shall each be painted outside with the color of the light they respectively contain,

and shall be provided with proper screens. Substitute for

ART. 7. Steam-vessels of less than forty, and vessels under Aug. 19, 1 Supp. R. s., 782. oars or sails of less than twenty tons gross tonnage, re

Small vessels spectively, and rowing boats, when under way, shall not be tain lights. required to carry the lights mentioned in article two (a), (b),

and (c), but if they do not carry them they shall be provided with the following lights:

First. Steam-vessels of less than forty tons shall carry

(a) In the fore part of the vessel, or on or in front of the funnel, where it can best be seen, and at a height above the gunwale of not less than nine feet, a bright white light constructed and fixed as prescribed in article two (a), and of such a character as to be visible at a distance of at least two miles.

"(b) Green and red side-lights constructed and fixed as prescribed in article two (0) and (c), and of such a character as to be visible at a distance of at least one mile, or a combined lantern showing a green light and a red light from right ahead to two points abaft the beam on their respective sides. Such lanterns shall be carried not less than three feet below the white

light. Small steam " Second. Small steamboats, such as are carried by seagoing by other vessels, vessels, may carry the white light at a less height than nine feet

Small steam vessels.

boats as carried

under sails.

above the gunwale, but it shall be carried above the combined lantern mentioned in subdivision one (b).

Third. Vessels under oars or sails of less than twenty Small vessels tons shall have ready at hand a lantern with a green glass on one side and a red glass on the other, which, on the approach of or to other vessels, shall be exhibited in sufficient time to prevent collision, so that the green light shall not be seen on the port side nor the red light on the starboard side.

Fourth. Rowing boats, whether under oars or sail, shall hare ready at hand a lantern showing a white light which shall be temporarily exhibited in suficient time to prevent collision.

The vessels referred to in this article shall not be obliged to carry the lights prescribed by article four (a) and article eleren, last paragraph."-[Act of May 28, 1894.

ART. 8. Pilot-vessels when engaged on their station on pilotage duty shall not show the lights required for other vessels, but shall carry a white light at the masthead, visi. ble all around the horizon, and shall also exhibit a flare-up light or flare-up lights at short intervals, which shall never exceed fifteen minutes.

On the near approach of or to other vessels they shall have their side-lights lighted, ready for use, and shall flash or show them at short intervals, to indicate the direction in which they are heading, but the green light shall not be shown on the port side, nor the red light on the starboard side.

A pilot-ressel of such a class as to be obliged to go alongside of a vessel to put a pilot on board may show the white light instead of carrying it at the masthearl, and may, instead of the colored lights above mentioned, have at hand, ready for use, a lantern with a green glass on the one side and a red glass on the other, to be used as prescribed abore.

Pilot.vessels when not engaged on their station on pilotage duty shall carry lights similar to those of other vessels of their tonnage.

ART.9. (Article nine, act of August 19, 1890, was repealed by act of May 28, 1894, and article 10, act of March 3, 1885, was reenacted in part as follows, by act of August 13, 1894, and is reproduced here as article 9 :)

Fishing-vessels of less than twenty tons net registered tonnage, when under way and when not baving their nets, trawls, dredges, or lines in the water, shall not be obliged to carry the colored side-lights; but every such vessel shall in lieu thereof bave ready at hand a lantern with a green glass on the one side and a red glass on the other side, and on approaching to or being approached by another vessel such lantern shall be exhibited in sufficient time to prevent collision, so that the green light shall not be seen on the port side nor the red light on the starboard side.

The following portion of this article applies only to fishing

vessels and boats when in the sea off the coast of Europe lying north of Cape Finisterre:

(a) All fishing vessels and fishing boats of twenty tons net registered tonnage or upward, when under way and when not baving their nets, trawls, dredges, or lines in the water, sball carry and show the same lights as other vessels under way:

(b) All vessels when engaged in fishing with drift-nets shall exhibit two white lights from any part of the vessel where they can be best seen. Such lights shall be placed so that the vertical distance between them shall be not less than six feet and not more than ten feet, and so that the horizontal distance between them, measured in a line with the keel of the vessel, shall be not less than five feet and not more than ten feet. The lower of these two lights shall be the more forward, and both of them shall be of such a character and contained in lanterns of such construction as to slow all round the horizon, on a dark night, with a clear atmosphere, for a distance of not less than three miles.

(c) All vessels when trawling, dredging, or fishing with any kind of drag-nets shall exhibit, from some part of the vessel where they can be best seen, two lights. One of these lights shall be red and the other shall be white. The red light shall be above the white light, and shall be at a vertical distance from it of not less than six feet and not more than twelve feet; and the horizontal distance between them, if any, shall not be more than ten feet. These two lights shall be of such a character and contained in lanterns of such construction as to be visible all round the horizon, on a dark night, with a clear atmosphere, the white light to a distance of not less than three miles and the red light of not less than two miles.

(d) A vessel employed in line-fishing, with her lines out, shall carry the same lights as a vessel when engaged in fishing with drift-nets.

(e) If a vessel, when fishing with a trawl, dredge, or any kind of drag-net, becomes stationary in consequence of her gear getting fast to a rock or other obstruction, she shall show the light and make the fog signal for a vessel at anchor.

($) Fishing vessels may at any time use a flare-up in addition to the lights which they are by this article required to carry and show. All flare-up lights exbibted by a vessel when trawling, dredging, or fishing with any kind of dragnet shall be shown at the after-part of the vessel, excepting that if the vessel is hanging by the stern to her trawl, dredge, or drag.net they shall be exhibited from the bow.

(g) Every fishing vessel when at anchor between sunset and sunrise shall exhibit a white light, visible all round the horizon at a distance of at least one mile.

(h) In a fog a drift-net vessel attached to her nets, and a vessel when trawling, dredging, or fishing with any kind of drag-net, and a vessel employed in line-fishing with her lines out, shall, at intervals of not more than two minutes, make a blast with her fog-horn and ring her bell alternately. [Art. 10, Act March 3, 1885.

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