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In the cottage of the rudest peasant,

In ancestral homes, whose crumbling towers, Speaking of the Past unto the Present,

Tell us of the ancient Games of Flowers ;

In all places then, and in all seasons,

Flowers expand their light and soul-like wings, Teaching us, by most persuasive reasons,

How akin they are to human things.

And with child-like, credulous affection,

We behold their tender buds expand; Emblems of our own great resurrection, Emblems of the bright and better land.

LONGFELLOW.

A PSALM OF LIFE.

Tell me not, in mournful numbers,

Life is but an empty dream!
For the soul is dead that slumbers,

And things are not what they seem.

Life is real! Life is earnest !

And the grave is not its goal;
“ Dust thou art, to dust returnest,"

Was not spoken of the soul.

Not enjoyment and not sorrow,

Is our destined end or way;
But to act, that each to-morrow

Find us farther than to-day.

Art is long, and Time is fleeting,

And our hearts, though stout and brave, Still, like muffled drums, are beating

Funeral marches to the grave.

In the world's broad field of battle,

In the bivouac of Life,
Bo not like dumb, driven cattle!

Be a hero in the strife!

Trust no Future, howe'er pleasant !

Let the dead Past bury its dead ! Act-act in the living Present !

Heart within, and God o'erhead !

Lives of great men all remind us

We can make our lives sublime, And departing, leave behind us

Footsteps on the sands of time;

Footprints, that perhaps another,

Sailing o'er life's solemn main,
A forlorn and shipwrecked brother,

Seeing, shall take heart again.

Let us, then, be up and doing,

With a heart for any fate; Still achieving, still pursuing,

Learn to labour and to wait.

LONGFELLOW.

THE REAPER AND THE FLOWERS.

THERE is a Reaper, whose name is Death,

And, with his sickle keen,
He reaps the bearded grain at a breath,

And the flowers that grow between.

“ Shall I have nought that is fair?” saith he;

“ Have nought but the bearded grain ! Though the breath of these flowers is sweet to me,

I will give them all back again.”

He gazed at the flowers with tearful eyes,

He kissed their drooping leaves; It was for the Lord of Paradise

He bound them in his sheaves.

“My Lord hath need of these flowerets gay,”

The Reaper said and smiled; “Dear tokens of the earth are they,

Where he was once a child.

« They shall all bloom in fields of light,

Transplanted by my care,
And saints upon their garments white,

These sacred blossoms wear.”

And the mother gave in tears and pain,

The flowers she most did love;
She knew she should find them all again

In the fields of light above.

0, not in cruelty, not in wrath,

The Reaper came that day; 'Twas an angel visited the green earth, And took the flowers away.

LONGFELLOW.

THE SILENT LAND.

FROM THE GERMAN OF SALIS. Into the Silent Land ! Ah! who shall lead us thither? Clouds in the evening sky more darkly gather, And shattered wrecks lie thicker on the strand; Who leads us with a gentle hand, Thither, O thither, Into the Silent Land:

Into the Silent Land !
To you, ye boundless regions
Of all perfection! tender morning visions
Of beauteous souls ! Eternity's own band !
Who in life's battle firm doth stand,
Shall bear hope's tender blossoms
Into the Silent Land !

O Land! O land !
For all the broken-hearted
The mildest herald by our fate allotted,
Beckons, and with inverted torch doth stand,
To lead us with a gentle hand
Into the land of the great departed,
Into the Silent Land !

LONGFELLOW. THE SLAVE'S DREAM.

BESIDE the ungathered rice he lay,

His sickle in his hand;
His breast was bare, his matted hair

Was buried in the sand.
Again, in the mist and shadow of sleep,

He saw his Native Land.

Wide through the landscape of his dreams

The lordly Niger flowed:
Beneath the palm-trees on the plain

Once more a king he strode;
And heard the tinkling caravans

Descend the mountain-road.

He saw once more his dark-eyed queen

Among her children stand ;
They clasped his neck, they kissed his cheeks,

They held him by the hand !-
A tear burst from the sleeper's lids,

And fell into the sand.

And then at furious speed he rode

Along the Niger's bank;
His bridle-reins were golden chains,

And, with a martial clank,
At each leap he could feel his scabbard of steel

Smiting his stallion's flank.

Before him, like a blood-red flag,

The bright flamingoes flew;

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