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’T was merry when You wager'd on your angling; when your diver Did hang a salt-fish on his hook, which he With fervency drew up. Antony and Cleopatra. Act ii. Sc. 5. Come, thou monarch of the vine, Plumpy Bacchus with pink eyne!

Sc. 7. Who does i' the wars more than his captain can Becomes his captain's captain; and ambition, The soldier's virtue, rather makes choice of loss, Than gain which darkens him.

Act iüi. Sc. 1. He wears the rose Of youth upon him.

Sc. 13. Men's judgments are A parcel of their fortunes; and things outward Do draw the inward quality after them, To suffer all alike.

Ibid. To business that we love we rise betime, And go to 't with delight.

Act iv. Sc. 4. This morning, like the spirit of a youth That means to be of note, begins betimes.

Ibid. The shirt of Nessus is upon me.

Sc. 12. Sometime we see a cloud that's dragonish; A vapour sometime like a bear or lion, A tower'd citadel, a pendent rock, A forked mountain, or blue promontory With trees upon 't.

Sc. 14. That which is now a horse, even with a thought The rack dislimns, and makes it indistinct, As water is in water.

Ibid.
Since Cleopatra died,
I have liv'd in such dishonour that the gods
Detest

my
baseness.

Ibid. I am dying, Egypt, dying.

Sc. 15.

Oh, wither'd is the garland of the war,
The soldier's pole is fallen."

Antony and Cleopatra. Act iv. Sc. 15. Let's do it after the high Roman fashion.

Ibid. For his bounty, There was no winter in 't; an autumn 't was That grew the more by reaping.

Act v. Sc. 2. If there be, or ever were, one such, It's past the size of dreaming.

lbid. Mechanic slaves With greasy aprons, rules, and hammers.

Ibid. I have Immortal longings in me.

Ibid. Lest the bargain should catch cold and starve.

Cymbeline. Act i. Sc. 4. Hath his bellyful of fighting.

Act ii. Sc. 1. How bravely thou becomest thy bed, fresh lily.

Sc. 2. The most patient man in loss, the most coldest that ever turned up ace.

Sc. 3.
Hark, hark! the lark at heaven's gate sings,

And Phæbus 'gins arise,2
His steeds to water at those springs

On chaliced flowers that lies;
And winking Mary-buds begin

To ope their golden eyes :
With everything that pretty is,
My lady sweet, arise.

Ibid. As chaste as unsunn'd snow.

Sc. 5.

Act ii. Sc. 2.

Some griefs are medicinable.
Prouder than rustling in un paid-for silk.

Sc. 3.

1 See Marlowe, page 41.
i See Lyly, page 32.

So slippery that The fear 's as bad as falling.

Cymbeline. Act iii. Sc. 3.

The game

is

up.

Ibid.

No, 't is slander,
Whose edge is sharper than the sword, whose tongue
Outvenoms all the worms of Nile, whose breath
Rides on the posting winds, and doth belie
All corners of the world.

Sc. 4.

Some jay of Italy,
Whose mother was her painting, hath betray'd him :
Poor I am stale, a garment out of fashion.

Ibid.
It is no act of common passage, but
A strain of rareness.

Ibid.

Ibid.

Ibid.

I have not slept one wink.

Thou art all the comfort
The gods will diet me with.

Weariness
Can snore upon the flint, when resty sloth
Finds the down pillow hard.

An angel ! or, if not,
An earthly paragon!
Triumphs for nothing and lamenting toys
Is jollity for apes and grief for boys.

Sc. 6.

Ibid.

Act iv. Sc. 2.

And put

My clouted brogues from off my feet.

Ibid.

Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney-sweepers, come to dust.

Ibid.

Oh, never say hereafter
But I am truest speaker. You call’d me brother
When I was but your
sister.

Act v. Sc. 5.

Like an arrow shot
From a well-experienc'd archer hits the mark
His eye doth level at.

Pericles. Act i. Sc. 1.

3 Fish. Master, I marvel how the fishes live in the

sea.

1 Fish. Why, as men do a-land: the great ones eat up the little ones.

Act i. Sc. 1.

Bid me discourse, I will enchant thine ear.

Venus and Adonis. Line 145,

For he being dead, with him is beauty slain,
And, beauty dead, black chaos comes again. Line 1019.
The
grass stoops not, she treads on it so light.

Line 1027. For greatest scandal waits on greatest state.

Lucrece. Line 1006. Thou art thy mother's glass, and she in thee Calls back the lovely April of her prime. Sonnet ii. And stretched metre of an antique song. Sonnet zuii.

But thy eternal summer shall not fade. Sonnet xviii.
The painful warrior famoused for fight,
After a thousand victories, once foil'd,
Is from the books of honour razed quite,
And all the rest forgot for which he toil'd. Sonnet xxv.
When to the sessions of sweet silent thought
I summon up remembrance of things past,
I sigh the lack of many a thing I sought,
And with old woes new wail my dear time's waste.

Sonnet xxx.

Full many a glorious morning have I seen.

Sonnet xxxiii.

My grief lies onward and my joy behind.

Sonnet l.

1 " Worth" in White.

Sonnet lii.

Like stones of worth, they thinly placed are,
Or captain jewels in the carcanet.
The rose looks fair, but fairer we it deem
For that sweet odour which doth in it live.

Sonnet lir.

Not marble, nor the gilded monuments
Of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme. Sonnet le.
Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea,
But sad mortality o'ersways their power,
How with this rage shall beauty hold a plea,
Whose action is no stronger than a flower ? Sonnet lxv.
And art made tongue-tied by authority.

Sonnet læri.
And simple truth miscall'd simplicity,
And captive good attending captain ill.

Ibid. The ornament of beauty is suspect, A crow that flies in heaven's sweetest air. Sonnet lxx.

That time of year thou may'st in me behold,
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruin'd choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.

Sonnet lxxiii.
Your monument shall be my gentle verse,
Which eyes not yet created shall o'er-read,
And tongues to be your being shall rehearse
When all the breathers of this world are dead;
You still shall live — such virtue hath my pen –
Where breath most breathes, even in the mouths of men.

Sonnet licxxi. Farewell ! thou art too dear for my possessing.

Sonnet lxxxvii. Do not drop in for an after-loss. Ah, do not, when my heart hath 'scap'd this sorrow, Come in the rearward of a conquer'd woe; Give not a windy night a rainy morrow, To linger out a purpos'd overthrow.

Sonnel xc.

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