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" ... shade. It lives in gusto, be it foul or fair, high or low, rich or poor, mean or elevated — it has as much delight in conceiving an lago as an Imogen. "
The Challenge of Keats: Bicentenary Essays 1795-1995 - Página 153
editado por - 2000 - 313 páginas
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The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science, and Art, Volumen16

1849
...cameleon poet. It does no harm from its relish of the dark side of things, any more than from its taste of the bright one, because they both end in speculation....because he has no identity ; he is continually in for and filling some other body. The sun, the moon, the sea, and men and women, who are creatures of an...
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Life, letters, and literary remains, of John Keats, Volumen1

Richard Monckton Milnes (1st baron Houghton.) - 1848
...delights the cameleon poet. It does no harm from its relish of the dark side of things, any more than from its taste for the bright one, because they both...because he has no identity; he is continually in for, and filling, some other body. The sun, the moon, the sea, and men and women, who are creatures of impulse,...
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Life, Letters, and Literary Remains, of John Keats

John Keats, Richard Monckton Milnes (Baron Houghton) - 1848 - 393 páginas
...delights the cameleon poet. It does no harm from its relish of the dark side of things, any more than from its taste for the bright one, because they both...end in speculation. A poet is the most unpoetical of any thing in existence, because he has no identity; he is continually in for, and filling, some other...
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Life, Letters, and Literary Remains, of John Keats

John Keats, Richard Monckton Milnes (Baron Houghton) - 1848 - 393 páginas
...for the bright one, because they bolh eml in speculation. A poet is the most unpoetical of any thing in existence, because he has no identity ; he is continually in for, and filling, some other body. The sun, the moon, the sea, and men and women, who are creatures of impulse,...
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The North British Review, Volumen10

1849
...poet. It does no harm from its relish of the dark side of tilings, any more than from its taste of the bright one, because they both end in speculation....because he has no identity ; he is continually in for and filling some other body. The sun, the moon, the sea, and men and women, who are creatures of an...
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The Daguerreotype, Volumen3

1849
...poet. It docs no harm from its relish of the dark side 'of things, any more than from its taste of the bright one, because they both end in speculation....because he has no identity ; he is continually in for and filling some other body. The sun, the moon, the sea, and men and women, who are creatures of an...
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Eclectic Magazine: Foreign Literature, Volumen16

1849
...caméléon poet. It does no harm from its relish of the dark side of things, any more than from its taste of the bright one, because they both end in speculation....because he has no identity ; he is continually in for and filling some other body. The sun, the moon, the sea, and men and women, who are creatures of an...
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Macmillan's Magazine, Volumen3

1861
...shocks the virtuous philosopher delights the chameleon poet. ... A poet is the most unpoetical thing in existence, because he has no identity ; he is continually in, for, and filling some other body. The sun, the moon, the sea, and men and women who are creatures of impulse,...
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The Life and Letters of John Keats

John Keats, Richard Monckton Milnes Baron Houghton, Richard Monckton Milnes (Baron Houghton) - 1867 - 363 páginas
...delights the cameleon poet^U does no harm from its relish .of the dark side of things, any more than from its taste for the bright one, because they both end in speculation^ A gflg^is thejngst_um3fleticarol anytmng in existence, because he has no iSSfflftVTlflTg 'continually...
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Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, and Other Essays

David Masson - 1874 - 305 páginas
...shocks the virtuous philosopher delights the chameleon poet. . . . A poet is the most unpoetical thing in existence, because he has no identity; he is continually in, for, and filling, some other body. The sun, the moon, the sea, and men and women who are creatures of impulse,...
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