Lord Byron and Some of His Contemporaries: With Recollections of the Author's Life, and of His Visit to Italy, Volumen2

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H. Colburn, 1828 - 513 páginas
 

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Página 337 - I have bedimm'd The noontide sun, call'd forth the mutinous winds, And 'twixt the green sea and the azur'd vault Set roaring war: to the dread rattling thunder Have I given fire, and rifted Jove's stout oak With his own bolt; the strong-bas'd promontory Have I made shake, and by the spurs pluck'd up The pine and cedar; graves at my command Have wak'd their sleepers, op'd, and let them forth By my so potent art.
Página 257 - ... a grassplot. The earth I filled with flowers and young trees. There was an apple-tree, from which we managed to get a pudding the second year. As to my flowers, they were allowed to be perfect. Thomas Moore, who came to see me with Lord Byron, told me he had seen no such heart's-ease. I bought the Parnaso Italiano...
Página 147 - ... with an air of ineffable endurance. Often he did not hear at all. It was a joke with us, when any of our friends came to the door, and we asked his permission to go to them, to address him with some preposterous question wide of the mark ; to which he used to assent. We would say, for instance, " Are you not a great fool, sir?" or, " Isn't your daughter a pretty girl?" to which he would reply,
Página 153 - There was a book used by the learners in reading, called Dialogues between a Missionary and an Indian. It was a poor performance, full of inconclusive arguments and other commonplaces. The boy in question used to appear with this book in his hand in the middle of the school, the master standing behind him. The lesson was to begin. Poor , whose great fault lay in a deep-toned drawl of his syllables and the omission of his stops, stood half-looking at the book, and half-casting his eye towards the...
Página 16 - I knew, have added the paternity; but I had never heard of it, and still less expected to find a child in his house. More obvious and obstreperous proofs, however, of the existence of a boy with a dirty face, could not have been met with.
Página 124 - Perhaps there is not a foundation in the country so truly English, taking that word to mean what Englishmen wish it to mean — something solid, unpretending, of good character, and free to all. More boys are to be found in it, who issue from a greater variety of ranks, than in any school in the kingdom; and as it is the most various, so it is the largest, of all the free schools.
Página 52 - Highgate, repeat one of his melodious lamentations, as he walked up and down, his voice undulating in a stream of music, and his regrets of youth sparkling with visions ever young. At the same time, he did me the honour to show me that he did not think so ill of all modern liberalism as some might suppose, denouncing the pretensions of the money-getting in a style which I should hardly venture upon, and never could equal; and asking with a triumphant eloquence what chastity itself were worth, if...
Página 339 - The dreadfull fish, that hath deserv'd the name Of Death, and like him lookes in dreadfull hew, The griesly wasserman, that makes his game The flying ships with...
Página 147 - As in prcesentis with an air of ineffable endurance. Often he did not hear at all. It was a joke with us, when any of our friends came to the door, and we asked his permission to go to them, to address him with some preposterous question wide of the mark ; to which he used to assent. We would say, for instance, "Are you not a great fool, sir? " or "Isn't your daughter a pretty girl? " to which he would reply, "Yes, child".

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