Resisting Global Toxics: Transnational Movements for Environmental Justice

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MIT Press, 2007 M08 10 - 358 páginas

Examines the export of hazardous wastes to poor communities of color around the world and charts the global social movements that challenge them.

Every year, nations and corporations in the “global North” produce millions of tons of toxic waste. Too often this hazardous material—inked to high rates of illness and death and widespread ecosystem damage—is exported to poor communities of color around the world. In Resisting Global Toxics, David Naguib Pellow examines this practice and charts the emergence of transnational environmental justice movements to challenge and reverse it. Pellow argues that waste dumping across national boundaries from rich to poor communities is a form of transnational environmental inequality that reflects North/South divisions in a globalized world, and that it must be theorized in the context of race, class, nation, and environment. Building on environmental justice studies, environmental sociology, social movement theory, and race theory, and drawing on his own research, interviews, and participant observations, Pellow investigates the phenomenon of global environmental inequality and considers the work of activists, organizations, and networks resisting it. He traces the transnational waste trade from its beginnings in the 1980s to the present day, examining global garbage dumping, the toxic pesticides that are the legacy of the Green Revolution in agriculture, and today's scourge of dumping and remanufacturing high tech and electronics products. The rise of the transnational environmental movements described in Resisting Global Toxics charts a pragmatic path toward environmental justice, human rights, and sustainability.

 

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Contenido

1 Environment Modernity Inequality
1
2 Race Class Environment and Resistance
37
3 Transnational Movement Networks for Environmental Justice
73
Trashing the Planet
97
Pesticides Poison the Global South
147
The Clean Industry Exports Its Trash
185
7 Theorizing Global Environmental Inequality and Global Social Movements for Human Rights and Environmental Justice
225
Principles of Environmental Justice
245
Abbreviations and Acronyms
249
Notes
253
References
293
Index
325
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Página 9 - I think the economic logic behind dumping a load of toxic waste in the lowest wage country is impeccable and we should face up to that.

Acerca del autor (2007)

David Naguib Pellow is Don A. Martindale Endowed Chair in Sociology at the University of Minnesota. Among his books are the award-winning Garbage Wars: The Struggle for Environmental Justice in Chicago (MIT Press, 2002) and Power, Justice, and the Environment: A Critical Appraisal of the Environmental Justice Movement (coedited with Robert Brulle; MIT Press, 2005.)

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