Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

saw me, and I stopped her with a spear in the withers. I had before this told my shikaree, who had my gun in his hand, that I would spear this bear, and that he was on no account to shoot, unless the bear got hold of me in the scuffle. Directly the bear received the spear, she threw herself on her back, and I was not strong enough to hold her down, so disengaging herself, and before I could straighten the spear again, she rushed upon me. The crooked shaft prevented me from spearing straight, and the blade passed only through the side. Sbe very nearly caught me round the waist, but I drew out the spear, and as she again charged in blind fury I allowed her to pass me, in doing which I sent the spear in behind the shoulders. As usual, she threw herself upon her back, and before she could recover herself, putting my sbikar knife between her fore paws, I sheathed it in her heart, killing her dead. My shikaree, with the rest of the men, had bolted.And again, when speaking of the requisites of a good hunter, " one of the great secrets in stalking game in the jungles, is to know how to walk silently, both in putting the foot on the ground and in not rustling the bushes, branches, or grass. The pace to walk at must be regulated by many circumstances. The kind of foot which will fall most silently must be given by God; for it must be naturally arched in the instep, and bave its corresponding concave in the sole. Only this formation of foot will allow of a silent and firm tread, and will give the elasticity and strength necessary to support the weigbt of the body through a long days toil without jarring the limbs above it, or wearying the muscles and tendons which have to move it. A foot of this form is also less liable to bruises from stones and hard ground. The shoe or boot must not be made with thick soles. I myself use Wellington boots, to keep the spear grass out of my ankles ; but if one's work is among rocks, which it may be in bear or ibex shooting, the soft sambur-skin shoe will be best. You can bave it made as light as a racket-shoe.” Shade of Davy Crockett! what think you of this ? Verily there is no good ale but that distilled of Thames water, and as Falstaff would have it, but one great man in the kingdom, and he waxes old and fat. 2.- The Ebony Idol. 12mo., pp. 283. New York: D. Appleton & Co.

This little volume will be found another touch upon the negro lyre, and all those not yet weary with this eternal harping upon the negro string will find abundant here to whet up their morbid sensibilities. Yet we would warn the posilires to be careful how they touch it, for it is charged to the muzzle against all those philanthropists who have been so long exerting their zeal in the “ holy cause "-threatening annihilation to our Southern brethren-to tear up the pational flag, and boldly flouting their fists in the face of Uncle Sam-or they will get their fingers burned. Taking for his stand-point of view the purlieus of one of our remote country villages, the author attempts with good grace the eclair. cissement of those vague reverences we see so often springing up in our midst to the neglect of our own individual frailties and home sins, and pictures to us what he deems some of the practical illustrations of our zeal in foreign causes while withholding dew and nourishment from our own home vinyards. It is vigorously written, and though some of the characters have been over wrought, for the sake of sensation, the author exhibits a good deal of talent in his various caricatures, and to say the least, has succeeded in weaving together a very readable and amusing story. As for ourselves, we think we have had full enough books touching these subjects, for we opine that all this sort of teaching is but vanity. for it is a noted fact, that even those of sterling talents are attracted from their even orbit by that strange fascination mind wields over mind; and the staid and doubting stickler for fact is not upfrequently the very first to adopt the absurdest issue of the day. 3.--An Elementary Grammar of the Italian Language, progressively arranged

for the Use of Schools and Colleges. By G. B. Fontana. 12mo., pp. 232. New York: D. Appleton & Co.

[blocks in formation]

ART.

PAQ I. BEVIEW, HISTORICAL AND CRITICAL, OF THE DIFFERENT SYSTEMS OF

SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY; OR, INTRODUCTION TO A MORE COMPREHENSIVE BYSTEM. Parr ix. The Political School of Sociology critically considered - The Three Different Classes of that School stated and defined-Macchiavelli, Locke, and Montesquieu critically examined, as Representatives of Three Different Varieties of the First Class - Aristotle and De Tocqueville compared with Montesquieu-Rousseau and Paine brought into review - The American Contribution to Social Science remarked uponHamilton, Madison, Jay, Jefferson, and Calhoun briefly noticed, as to their contributions to Social Science...

531 II. PHILADELPHIA-ITS MANUFACTURES. Population--Compared with New York

Advantages of Site-Minerals—Value of Manufactures-Position of State-Accumulation of Capital and Materials-Aggregate of Manufactures - Product per Head-Distribution of Industry-Clothing in Philadelphia-Effect of Panic - State of the Trade in Boston-Textile Manufactures in Philadelphia-Factories- Mode of ManafactureWoolens-Labor Value of Cottons-Table of Factories-Goods Consigned to Philadelphia-Local Production-Aggregate Market-Iron Trade-Product-Pig Iron-Rolling Mills-Woolens sold in Philadelphia-Commerce.......

555 III, VALUATION OF LIFE INSURANCE POLICIES. No. vii. By Prof. C. F. MOCAY, of Georgia

567 IV. CURRENCY OF THE UNITED STATES By CHARLES H. CARROLL, Merchant, Bos. ton..

574

JOURNAL OF MERCANTILE LAW.

The Bombardınent of Greytown..
Alleged Fraud on the Revenue..
The Schuyler Frauds and the New Haven Railroad Stock-Advances on Cotton.

583 585 586

COMMERCIAL CHRONICLE AND REVIEW.

Progress of Business-Imports-Exports - Domestic Produce-Approximation of Exports to

Imports-Effect on Exchanges-Larger Portion of Breadstuffs-Table of Exports-Grain at the West-Milwaukee --Chicago - Railroads-Rise in Values-Absorption of Funds-Capital at Call-Grain for Freights-No Speculation at the West-Money in the Stock Market-Bank Loans -Contraction Comparative -Loans on the Market-Rates of Money-Remittances Sterling Bills --Rates of Exchange--Current of Specie-Gold Shipments ---Specie in the City -Assay-otfice-Mint.....

587-595 VOL. XIIII.-NO. V.

34

PAGB

JOURNAL OF BANKING, CURRENCY, AND FINANCE. Baltimore Liabilities....

595 New Orleans United States Branch Mint.-Leather Failures.

596 Wealth of New York State...

597 City Weekly Bank Returns—Banks of New York, Boston, Philadelphia, New Orleans, Pittsburg, St. Louis, Providence

599 Boston Bank Dividends....

603 The Revenue of Cuba.........

605 STATISTICS OF TRADE AND COMMERCE. Wine Product of France

606 New York City Trade.-Trade of Cincinnati

607 British Merchant Shipping...,

611 Milk Trade.-Imports or Hamburg.–Gutta Percha...

612 Trade in Breadstuffs of the City of New York......

613 NAUTICAL INTELLIGENCE. Sales of Ships.— The Shipping Interest..

614 New York Shipping.....

615 Naval Change

616 COMMERCIAL REGULATIONS. River and Freights ..

616 Imitation Merino Shirts.

617 Woolen Ilats.---Landscape Plates.-New Tariff of Rates between Chicago and Southern Cities 618

POSTAL DE PARTMENT.
Post-office of the Sandwich Islands-Report of the Postmaster General.

619 The British Post-office.-English Post-oilice Packet Service, 1858-59.

JOURNAL OF INSURANCE. Alabama Insurance Law

621 Insurance Scrip Dividends.-Humors of Health Insurance

623 Marine Insurance Scrip...

JOURNAL OF MINING, MANUFACTURES, AND ART. The Pennsylvania Rock Oil....

625 Galvanizing Iron..

626 Cotton Manufacture in Scotland.

627 Flax Cotton.-Rhode Island Coal

628 Manchester Operatives.- The Needle The Last” Manufactory at Richmond.-Smoke from Gas-lights

680 Levels of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans..

630 RAIL ROAD, CANAL, AND STEAMBOAT STATISTICS. Manufacture of Railway Iron

631 Cotton on Railroads

632 Railways in Texas.

683 Southwestern Railroad Company of Georgia..

634 New Orleans, Jackson, and Great Northern Railroad.-Prophecy in Regard to Railroads. American Railroad Enterprise in Brazil-History of Brazil Roads....

635 Railroad Receipts for September.

637 STATISTICS OF AGRICULTURE, &c. Grape Culture on Kelley's Island, Ohio....... Cotton...

640 A California Fruit-Orchard - The Crops in California....

613 STATISTICS OF POPULATION, &c. Population and Growth of Boston... Population of Spain. - Population of Milwankee

645 Population of some Ohio Towns.-Census of Cincinnati.-Consus of Rhode Island

646 Business Population of San Francisco.- Census of New Hampshire....

647 Statistics of Population of Baltimore County.--Michigan Towns-Population

643 MERCANTILE MISCELLANIES. New York Central Park The End of Debt.....

649 Direct Southern Trade with Europe Sailors-- What they are, and what they should be

651 Facts and Figures

659 Anecdote of Stephen Girard.—London Tobacco Trade and Consumption.....

658

654 THE BOOK TRADE. Notices of new Books or new Editions...

655-656

[ocr errors]

HUNT'S

MERCHANTS' MAGAZINE

AND

COMMERCIAL REVIEW.

NOVEMBER, 1860.

Art. 1.--REVIEW, HISTORICAL AND CRITICAL, OF THE DIFFERENT SYSTEMS

OF SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY :*

OR, INTRODUCTION TO A MORE COMPREHENSIVE SYSTEM.

PART IX.

THE POLITICAL SCHOOL OF SOCIOLOGY CRITICALLY CONSIDERED THE THREE DIFFERENT CLASSES or

THAT SCHOOL STATED AND DEFINED-MACCHIAVELLI, LOCKE, AND MONTESQUIEU CRITICALLY EXAMINED, AS REPRESENTATIVES OF THREE DIFFERENT VARIETIES OF TIIE FIRST CLASS-ARISTOTLE AND DE TOCQUEVILLE COMPARED WITH MONTESQUIEU--ROUSSEAU AND PAINE BROUGHT INTO REVIEW-TIE AMERICAN CONTRIBUTION TO SOCIAL SCIENCE REMARKED UPON-HAMILTON, MADISON, JAY, JEFFERBOX, AND CALIOUN BEIEFLY NOTICED, AS TO THEIR CONTRIBUTIONS TO SOCIAL SCIENCE.

Having now concluded our glance at the different races of mankind not belonging to the Caucasian or most superior race, and those nations of the Caucasian race that have flourished before the present age, with a view to extracting whatever noteworthy ideas in Sociology they may have either speculatively entertained or practically illustrated, we come now to the more methodical consideration of sociological ideas and systems, according to the classification of them which we have already laid down, as appertaining to the Political, Politico-Economical, or Maltħusian schools ; and the course of our review, which has been, hitherto, rambling and disconnected, as a necessary consequence of its endeavor to comprehend, in one survey, and reduce to some historical order, a field, at once so vast and so scantily supplied with material, becomes henceforth more systematical and connected.

All the ideas which have hitherto come under our review, and which have been prominently developed before the present age, may be regarded as belonging to the Political School. For, although, as we have already seen, some ideas may be detected in the discourses of Plato and Aristotle on Politics, which appertain rather to the Politico-Economical and Mal

Enterod according to an act of Congress, in the year 1859, by Geo. W. &JNO. A. Wood, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States, for the southern district of New York.

thusian schools, and some indeed of a still more fundamental character, yet they were not developed with sufficient prominence to form the basis of any particular school or system of Social Philosophy. In the present age, however, not only have these two last-named schools been distinctly and prominently developed, as systems of Social Philosophy, but the theories and projects of the Political School bave so multiplied as to render it a work of vast difficulty even to redrce them to a general and methodical classification, so as to admit of their being all synthetically, or summarily, considered, and according to their logical connections, merely, while treating them in detail, or with reference to the historical order of their development, it would be prepostrous to attempt, and of little utility to accomplish, were it practicable. It is upon the former plan alone that it is intended here to consider these muliitudinous ideas in Sociology, although some ideas may be more particularly considered, with a view to illustrating more distinctly the class of ideas to which they appertain. Regard will be had, moreover, to the historical order of their development, so far as can be done, consistently with the more general plan of considering them according to their logical connection.

The historical connection of ideas is, indeed, sometimes so intimately related to their logical connection, as to illustrate it with peculiar distinctness, and to become, thereby, of special and vital interest. Such was the case in respect to the logical and historical connection between the Political and Malthusian schools of Social Philosophy. For the Political School of Social Philosophy culminated in Godwin's Political Jlistice, by the effect which that work had in stimulating Malthus to inquiry, whose opposing system occasioned its decline, and the Malthusian School took its rise from this occasion. In other words, the fundamental errors of the Political School cropped out so manifestly in Godwin's Political Justice, that Malthus clearly discerned them, and was thereby urged into that train of inquiry, which led him to the discovery of those principles which constitute the fundamental ideas of bis school. Where the historical connection of ideas is so intimately associated with their logical and vital connections, as in this instance, it would be great neglect to overlook them; nor shall we fail to give clear and distinct prominence to facts so noteworthy and of so much significance in the history of Social Philosophy.

The multitudinous theories or plans for the improvement of the social condition, which may be regarded as belonging, fundamentally and sentially, to the Political School of Sociology, may be all comprehended under the three following classes, to one or other of which they may be all referred :

I. Those which aim at improving the social condition by simply devising a political system, or organism, capable of performing, in the best possible manner, the legitimate function of government.

II. Those which aim at improving the social condition to a greater extent, and somewhat more fundamentally, than the legitimate function of government can ever improve it, and to an extent which is indeed possible, thouglı not very likely to be attained, and wbich, as a means of attaining that end, aim at devising a political system which transcends the legitimate function of government.

III. Those which aim at improving the social condition to an extent totally impracticable, and utterly chimerical to calculate on, and which

« AnteriorContinuar »