The Dictionary of Every-day Difficulties in Reading, Writing, and Speaking the English Language ...

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Ward, Lock, & Tyler, 1862 - 364 páginas
 

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Página 20 - Behold, my servants shall eat, but ye shall be hungry: behold, my servants shall drink, but ye shall be thirsty: behold, my servants shall rejoice, but ye shall be ashamed: Behold, my servants shall sing for joy of heart, but ye shall cry for sorrow of heart, and shall howl for vexation of spirit.
Página 329 - Alfred, who, to prevent the rapines and disorders which formerly prevailed in the realm, instituted tithings, so called from the Saxon, because ten freeholders, with their families composed one. These all dwelt together, and were sureties or free pledges to the king for the good behaviour of each other; and, if any offence was committed in their district, they were bound to have the offender forthcoming.
Página 79 - Tenant by the curtesy of England, is where a man marries a woman seised of an estate of inheritance ; that is, of lands and tenements in fee simple or fee tail ; and has by her issue, born alive, which was capable of inheriting her estate. In this case he shall, on the death of his wife, hold the lands for his life as tenant by the curtesy of England.
Página 52 - Champerty is a species of maintenance and punished in the- same manner ; being a bargain with a plaintiff or defendant, campum partire, to divide the land or other matter sued for between them, if they prevail at law : whereupon the champertor is to carry on the party's suit at his own expense.
Página 222 - As for acts of parliament to attaint particular persons of treason or felony, or to inflict pains and penalties, beyond or contrary to the common law, to serve a special purpose, I speak not of them ; being to all intents and purposes new laws, made pro re nata, and by no means an execution of such as are already in being.
Página 167 - An officer in England of great antiquity, and formerly of great authority, whose business is to direct the heralds, preside at their chapters, and have the jurisdiction of armoury. There are three kings -at -arms; namely, Garter, Clarencieux, and Norroy.

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