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or body, purse or person, where duty called or conscience pointed. In the prime and height of his life, be sank suddenly into the grave, lamented by his own nation, and regretted by all those throughout Christendom who take any interest in the Catholic affairs of Great Britain and Ireland.

Of the works and days of this excellent person, I have told in the following pages all I could glean, from the very interesting papers committed to me for that purpose, by the surviving members of his family.

NEW YORK, St. BRIDGET'S DAY, 1857.

spread slowly over the provinces. The landed proprietors of the second and third generations, having the fear of the grim Sir Phelim no longer before their eyes, began to rival in prodigality the old chiefs they had displaced, and whose praises were still sung around them. The tuneful Jacobite, Thurlogh O'Carolan, was a guest as welcome at Moneyglass and Castle Archdale as at Alderford or Castle Kelley. The new lords of Cavan and Fermanagh were proof to his politics but not to his melody; they might dislike him as a Catholic, but they were proud of him as a countryman. The fairest hands in their halls brought the matchless harp and filled the consoling cup for the Bard, whose errant ways and blinded eyes aptly illustrated the mental con. dition of a country where the old civilization had been extinguished before the new one was born, whose altars were down, whose traditions were lost, whose ancient paths were obliteratcd, and for which there seemed no escape, no deliverance out of the vicious circle of clear-headed injustice and incapacity entailed. Socially, the new gentry had grown more tolerant and tolerable, but politic ally, as the last years of the Irish Parliament proved, they hated the religion of the vast majority of their fellow countrymen as intensely as ever did the Walkers and the Wolseys during the war of King Wiliam and King James.

In this Province, in this state and period of society, about the commencement of the Cutholic Restoration, the late Dr. Maginn's lot was cast. He was born of an orthodox stock; he grew up among a gallant and pious, but rash and much-abused peasantry; he retired from amongst them for a time, to reappcar again with the highest authority upon their altars. We will see him planning and laboring in lakebound Ionishowen, and within the walls of “the maiden city," as Priest and Leader, for a quarter of a century. All who have patience to peruse—

“The short and simple annals of the poor," will witness how truly he approved himself the father of his flock. His public spirit, his moral courage, his thorough identity with the country, his fervid eloquence, his unwearied industry, his application to details, made him, in some sort, the judge and legislator of his people. His external influence was limited by his enjoyment of the episcopal dignity to three short years. Yet in these three years he undoubtedly did arduous and honorable things, never sparing mind or body, purse or person, where duty called or conscience pointed. In the prime and height of his life, be sank suddenly into the grave, lamented by his own nation, and regretted by all those throughout Christendom who take any interest in the Catholic affairs of Great Britain and Ireland. .

Of the works and days of this excellent person, I have told in the following pages all I could glean, from the very interesting papers committed to me for that purpose, by the surviving members of his family.

New York, St. BRIDGET'S DAY, 1857.

LIFE OF RT. REV. EDWARD MAGINN.

CHAPTER I.

BIRTH AND FAMILY OF DR. MAGINN-HIS FIRST TEACHER-STUDIES

AT THE IRISH COLLEGE, PARIS-ORDAINED IN IRELAND-APPOINTED CURATE OF MOVILLE – BRIEF ACCOUNT OF INISHOWEN — " THE DERRY DISCUSSION"-CATHOLIC EMANCIPATION-MR. MAGINN APPOINTED PARISH PRIEST.

At the beginning of the present century there lived in the parish of Fintona, county Tyrone, Ireland, a Catholic farmer named Patrick Maginn. He married in early life Mary Slevin, by whom he had already seven children, when, on the 16th day of December, 1802, an eighth was born to them. To this child they gave in bap. tism the name of Edward.

The Maginns and Slevins were commonly spoken of, in that country, as "levitical families.” For many gene.

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