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increased the wage earner should not be expected to be content with wages fixed upon the old basis of living. Why should he? He should be admitted to a proper and fair share in the common prosperity. It is for the interest of all classes and of the State that he should not be left out of a just participation in the common wealth. It is a cause for congratulation that the principle of arbitration in the adjustment of great controversies between capital and labor has been recognized as never before, and that the National Government has exercised a salutary influence in bringing about such a mode of reconciling conflicting interests. So potent was that influence that we may hope to avoid in the future such serious complications as were involved in the great coal strike which for a time paralyzed the coal trade of the entire country, throwing thousands of men out of work and entailing untold suffering upon vast numbers of people whose business was not directly concerned in the mining or marketing of coal. There is but a remote possibility that such a catastrophe will again take place in this country.

The yield of our principal cereals, comprising wheat, corn, oats, rye and barley, aggregated 4,350,138,647 bushels, valued .on the farm at $1,821,805,745, grown upon 172,538,792 acres. Our crop of hay aggregated 50,857,576 tons, valued at $542,036,364, produced on 39,857,576 acres; the production of potatoes amounted to 284,632,787 bushels, valued at $134,111,436.

The corn crop was 1,001,128,421 bushels more than the crop of the year 1901, and was the largest ever raised in the country; the crop of wheat was 78,397,210 less than that for the year 1901, and was 670,063,008 bushels, and the crop of oats was 251,973,988 bushels in excess of that for the year 1901 and was the largest of record, being 987,842,712 bushels, valued at $303,584,852, produced on 28,658,144 acres.

Minnesota raised more wheal than was produced in any other state, aggregating 79,752,404 bushels; next came North Dakota with 62,872,241 bushels; then Missouri with 56,266,494 bushels; Nebraska with 52,726,451 bushels: then follow Kansas, South Dakota, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Washington and California in the order of their production.

Of the crop of corn, amounting to 2,523,64S,312 bushels, Illinois produced 372,436,416 bushels, valued at $134,077,110; Iowa,

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297,686,016 bushels, valued at $98,236,385; Missouri, 264,232,605 bushels, valued at $87,196,760; Nebraska, 252,520,173 bushels, valued at $75,756,052; Kansas, 222,805,621 bushels, valued at $75,753,911; Indiana, 171,332,142 bushels, valued at $61,679,571, and Ohio, 121,608,512 bushels, valued at $51,075,575. These states compose what is commonly known as the "Great Corn Belt" and have remarkable climatic conditions and a soil of wonderfu fertility.

Final returns to the Statistician of the Department of Agriculture from regular and special correspondents, supplemented by reports of Special Field Agents, show the acreage, production and value of the principal farm crops of the United States in 1902 to have been as follows:

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The March report of the Statistician of the Department of Agriculture shows the amount of wheat remaining in farmers' hands on March 1 to have been about 164,000,000 bushels, or 24.5 per cent of last year's crop, as compared with 23.2 per cent of the crop of 1901 on hand March 1, 1902, and 24.5 per cent of the crop of 1900 on hand March 1, 1901.

The corn in farmers' hands is estimated at about 1,050,600,000 bushels, or 41.6 per cent of last year's crop, against 29.2 per cent of the crop of 1901 on hand on March 1, 1902, and 36.9 per cent of the crop of 1900 on band on March 1, 1901.

Of oats there are reported to be about 365,000,000 bushels, or 36.9 per cent of last year's crop, still in farmers' hands, as compared with 30.6 per cent of the crop of 1901 on hand on March 1, 1902, and 36.2 per cent of the crop of 1900 on hand on March 1, 1901.

The following table shows the percentages of last year's crops of wheat, corn and oats in farmers' hands on March 1 for each of the principal grain-producing states:

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CROP CONDITIONS ON APRIL 1, 1903.

The April report of the Statistician of the Department of Agriculture shows the average condition of winter wheat on April 1 to have been 97.3, against 78.7 on April 1, 1902, 91.7 at the corresponding date in 1901, and 82.1, the mean of the April averages of the last ten years.

The average condition of winter rye on April 1 was 97.9, against 85.4 on April 1, 1902, 93.1 at the corresponding date in 1901, and 87.9, the mean of the April averages of the last ten years.

The following table shows the averages of condition on April 1, the corresponding averages one year ago, and the mean of the corresponding averages for the last ten years:

Winter Wheat.

Winter Rve.

States
And Territories.

Connecticut

New York

New Jersey

Pennsylvania

Delaware

Maryland

Virginia

North Carolina

South Carolina

Georgia

Alabama

Mississippi

Texas

Arkansas

Tennessee

West Virginia

Kentucky

Ohio

Michigan

Indiana

Illinois

Wisconsin

Iowa

Missouri

Kansas

Nebraska

Idaho

Washington

Oregon

California

Oklahoma

Indian Territory..

United States...

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