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SEEDS. The receipts of timothy seed during the year aggregated 49,959,011 pounds and shipments 40,111,410 pounds, as against 33,685,111 pounds received and 40,661,267 pounds shipped during the preceding year; 43,764,951 pounds received and 46,218,163 pounds shipped during the year 1900; 66, 233,991 pounds received and 52,430,340 pounds shipped during 1899; 73, 734,806 pounds received and 54,330,625 pounds shipped during 1898, and 57,079,591 pounds received and 46,417,248 pounds shipped during the year 1897. The receipts of clover seed during the year aggre. gated 7,770,868 pounds and shipments 6,339,522 pounds, as against 7,570,308 pounds received and 8,301,434 pounds shipped during the preceding year; 10,393,821 pounds received and 8,812, 802 pounds shipped during the year 1900; 7,855, 759 pounds received and 12,330,932 pounds shipped during 1899; 9,105,852 pounds received and 11,303,427 pounds shipped during 1898; 13,007,821 pounds received and 17,230,467 pounds shipped during the year 1897.

Of other kinds of grass seeds, the receipts during the year aggregated 13,363,688 pounds and shipments 11,723,284 pounds, as against 16,369,131 pounds received and 11,324,410 pounds shipped during the year 1901; 10,628,523 pounds received and 13,594,203 pounds shipped during 1900, and 10,136,159 pounds received and 11,318,25+ pounds shipped during the year 1899.

CLOVER SEED. The market for clover seed was in the main a conservative one and the general trend of prices was downward; the contract grades sold from $8.25 to $11.30, which did not materially vary from that of 1901. The spring trade was active and there was an evident willingness to realize, as prices had held high since 1900; and from $10 at the beginning of the year the prices declined to from $8.50 to $8.35. Dealers were fortunate in disposing of their accumulations, to a large extent, at good prices. From this point the market was slow and dragging until September, when prices improved to $9.00 to $9.50. Unfavorable weather produced some anxiety as to the crop, which restored confidence in prices for good to choice seed, and sales were made at $11.00 to $11.25 in October. The element of uncertainty, however, was not eliminated and transactions were devoid of any speculative character.

The year closed with sales of prime seed at $10.85 per 100 pounds.

A statement of weekly prices may be seen on page 91 of this volume.

The month of the largest receipts was November, when 2,612,460 pounds were received. The month of the largest shipments was March when 1,807,307 pounds were shipped.

A comprehensive statement may be found on page 89, showing the names of the transportation lines over which received and over which shipped; and also showing monthly receipts and shipments.

The exports of clover seed for the year aggregated 7,256,573 pounds, valued at $594,733, of which 2,894,027 pounds were shipped to Germany and 2,441,008 pounds to the United Kingdom.

TIMOTHY SEED. Timothy seed ranged in value from $5.00 to $6.20 per cental at the beginning of the year for ordinary to prime contract grades. The range for the year was from $2.00 for very undesirable lots, to $7.35, the lowest prices prevailing in November and December, and the highest prices in May. The advent of the new crop year, promising a large yield, imparted a downward tendency to prices. The prevalence of rains over the producing regions caused considerable damage and much of the seed was badly discolored, resulting in wide fluctuations in prices. The closing sales of the year were made at $.25 for strictly prime.

The Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railway brought 20,441,867 pounds, which was largely in excess of the number of pounds brought by any other line. The 4 ports aggregate 5,966,986 pounds.

On page 89 may be found a statement showing the routes by which received and shipped, and also showing the monthly receipts and shipments. The month of the largest receipts and shipments

vield, imparted the producing the discolored,

11,047,211 pounds shipped.

A large portion of the sales of this seed was made by sample and without special reference to grade. Some samples of a particularly good color, on account of an admixture of dirt, may not inspect “prime,” and yet at the same time may be very desirable and command high prices somewhat out of proportion to the prices paid for regular contract grades. A very close examination is made of samples, and experts select lots adapted to the character of the demand. For this reason there is a great variation in quotations, and it is difficult to give an accurate idea of prices obtained for a great variety of lots of this seed.

FLAXSEED.
The trade in flaxseed was dull throughout the year.

The crop was estimated at about 25,000,000 bushels; its quality was inferior to that of the preceding year, it being estimated that only 53 per cent. was of "Contract” grade as against 80 per cent. of the crop of 1901.

The quantity exported aggregated 3,874,033 bushels, valued at $6,031,887, of which 1,098,323 bushels were shipped to the United Kingdom; 695,905 bushels to the Dominion of Canada; 995,527 bushels to the Netherlands; 597,323 bushels to Belgium, and 286,595 bushels to France. There was an extensive demand for oil and a steady foreign trade in oil cake, owing to the prevailing high prices for feeding grades of all kinds of grain.

A comprehensive table of prices may be seen on pages 86, 87 and 88 of this volume; and on pages 104 and 105, a statement showing receipts and shipments of flaxseed for a series of years. Speculative business in this article was smaller during the year than for several years. A marked feature of this business was that a small portion of the flaxseed arriving in this market was handled through public warehouses.

The receipts of flaxseed, as elsewhere stated, during the year aggregated 4,737,667 bushels and shipments 1,254,780 bushels.

I refer for a full statement of receipts and shipments found on page 90 of this volume.

PROVISION TRADE. The trade in provisions was one with unusual characteristics, mainly occasioned by high prices for the coarser grains used for feeding stock. Under ordinary conditions receipts of hogs would have been quite small during the first months of the year, as there were comparatively few good hogs to come to market, but it soon developed that high prices, for corn and oats particularly, induced free shipments to market of immature hogs, and as a result there were large stocks of pork at provision packing points for which

there was but a limited demand during the early months of the year.

The receipts of pork during the year 1902 aggregated 9,824 barrels, and shipments 189,609 barrels. On pages 104 and 105 may be seen a statement of the receipts and shipments of pork from 1860 to 1902, inclusive. Our exports of pork from the port of Chicago during 1902 aggregated 5,119 barrels, valued at $88,397.

Sales of cash mess pork were made at the beginning of the year at $16.85 to $16.90 per barrel, and at the close of the year at $17.00 per barrel; for May delivery at $17.20 to $17.37} on the 2d of January, and at $15.80 to $15.90 on the last day of that month. The market during February was a dull one with a declining tendency recording sales on the 28th at $15.30 to $15.47} per barrel. The trade in March improved and at the close of that month sales were made for May delivery at $16.60 per barrel; the improvement continued through the month of April at a steady pace, sales on the 30th of April being made at $16.75 and at $17.00 on the 15th, for May delivery. Trade increased during May, and sales for July delivery were made at from $16.624 to $17.573; the improvement continued during the month of June and was distinctly marked at the close, round lots of cash pork selling at $18.30 per barrel.

The following statement is submitted, showing the highest, lowest and closing cash prices of mess pork in each month of the year, and also showing the highest and lowest prices of the year 1901: --- ----- ---- ----- -

1902.

1901. Months.

Low. January..

$ 17 00 $ 15 50 915 60 a $15 65 $ 15 00 $13 85 February...

15 85 15 00 15 25(a 15 30 14 15 13 95 March..

16 65 15 00 16 50/a 16 65 16 80 15 40 April...

16 95 16 35 16 60(a 16 65 15 55 14 55 17 50

75 17 10(a 17 15 15 20 14 70

18 45 17 20 18 25(a 18 30 14 90 1+ 65 July ..........

16 75 16 75(a 16 80 14 60 14 05 August.....

15 85 16 95(à 17 00 14 50 14 45 September

16 10 16 15(a 16 20 15 05 14 75 October ..

| 16 50(a 15 75 14 65 13 60 November.

16 50 16 75(a 16 87' 15 55 December

16 621

17 25 16 10

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High.

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High.

Low.

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May......
June ........

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16

15 20

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15 90

LIVE ANIMALS. Our export trade in live stock during 1902 amounted in value to $44,670,946, or $7,387,930 less than during 1901. The num

ber of cattle exported was 392,884; of hogs, 8,268; of horses, 103,029; of mules, 27,586; of sheep, 358,720.

On pages 196 and 197 may be seen statements showing, by states, the number of different kinds of animals on farms and ranches, the average price per head, and value.

On page 48 a statement may be found showing the range of prices per 100 pounds, of cattle, hogs and sheep for each month during the year 1902.

The following table shows the number of animals, including cattle and calves, hogs, sheep and horses, received in Chicago each year from 1880 to 1902, inclusive:

Year.

Cattle and

Oalves.
Number.

Hogs.

Sheep.
Number. Number.

Horses.
Number,

Aggregate

value.

- - - - - 100V................. 1880.. 1881.. 1882....... 1883.. 1884... 1885......... 1886......... 1887........ 1888...... 1889..... 1890..... 1891... 1892... 1893... 189 10yt.... .......... 1895... 1896...

.......... 1898... 189 190 1901 1902...

1,382,477 7,059,355 335,810
1,547,498 6,474,844 493,624
1,607,495 5,817,504 620,887
1,909,167 5,640,625 749,917
1,870,050 | 5,351,967 | 801.630
1.964,018 6,937,535 | 1,003,598
2,015,100 6,718,761 | 1,008,790
2,447.867 | 5,470,852 1,360,862
2,707,629 4,921,712 1,515,014
3,146,249 | 5.998,526 | 1,832, 469
3,659,305 7,663,828 2,182,667
3,455.742 8,600,805 2,153,537
3,769,372 7,714,435 2,145,079
3,343.963 6,057,278 3,031, 174
3,135,312 7,483,228 3,099,725
2,757,298 7,885,283 / 3,406,739
2,738,813 7,659,472 3,590,655
2,677,900 8,363, 724 3,606,640
2,613,630 9,357,114 3,589,439
2,651,122 8,177,870 3,382,832
2,865,356 8,109,064 | 3,548,885
3,213,220 8,290,494 | 4.044,095
3,193,306 7,895,238 4,515,716

10,398 $148,057,626 12,909 183,003, 710 13,856

196,670,221 15,255 | 201,252, 772 18,602 187,387,680 19,356 173,598,002 27,599 166,741, 754 46,404 176,644,597 55,333 182, 202, 789 79,926 203,321,924 101,566 231,344,879 94,396 239,434,777 86,998 253,836,502 82,492 249,542,375 97,415 228,153,029 113,193 200,584,380 105,978 187,745,655 111,601 216,305,396 118.754 229,301,296 111,611 233,711,180

99,010 262.154.272 109,353 | 283,955,239 102, 100 312,981,386

1897..

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The market for lard was an active one throughout the year and prices were higher than during 1901; stocks were kept within moderate dimensions under the management of leading operators. and the influence of a strong demand. Speculative trading was large, both on domestic and foreign account. The export demand was extensive, quite uniform in volume and well sustained during the year, sales ranging from $9.20 to $11.60, the lowest price ruling in February and the highest in September. A weekly statement of prices may be found on page 50 of this report; on page 54

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