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That we may all consider what is our real business, and true interest, in this world, and not put it off till too late an hour, may God Almighty of his infinite goodness grant, through Jesus Chrift our Lord!

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WHATSOEVER A MAN SOWETH, THAT SHALL

HE ALSO REAP: FOR HE THAT SOWETH TO
HIS FLESH, SHALL OF THE FLESH REAP COR-
RUPTION; BUT HE THAT SOWETH TO THE
SPIRIT, SHALL OF THE SPIRIT REAP LIFE
EVERLASTING.

THE text may be thus in general explained ; In whatever way a man lives, he shall be treated in the same way by God Almighty. If he lead a wicked life, he shall feel the mischief of it; and if he lead a pious one, he shall experience its advantages. And all this follows as naturally, as the grain you reap from the grain you sow. Wheat or barley will not more surely produce its kindred seed, than goodness will pro. duce happiness, and wickedness misery. The

apostle apostle does not appear to confine the observa. tion either to this world or the next; but feems to take them both together, declaring, in general, that a man's happiness, or misery, shall on the whole, depend upon his conduct in this

present life.

Neither does the apostle mention the merits of Christ, as the ground of our salvation; taking it for granted, that this will easily be understood; and that he who foweth to the spirit can only, after his best endeavours, reap life everlasting through Jesus Christ.

Having thus explained the apostle's general meaning, I shall, in the following discourse, first, endeavour to prove the truth of it; and shall, secondly, add a few. observations, which arise from it.

Now in many cases, even in this world, a man's reaping as he fows is so plain, that we cannot avoid feeing it. The virtue and the res ward—the sin and the punishment, follow so closely upon each other, that the most careless observer cannot but acknowledge the connection. -Thus, when we observe a course of prudent actions crowned with success, it is easy to see the effe&t following the cause. Or, when we see a mäti ruin his fortune at a gaming-table, we need nobody to point out the source of the mischief.

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But, in many cases, the good or the bad cons fequence is not so easily traced. It may be fome time before industry and frugality meet their deserved success; or the punishment may follow the offence fo very flowly, that we may not difcern the progress. When this is the case when fuffering does not immediately follow the transgression, men are apt to run blindly on, without considering consequences. Thus the man, who would not directly destroy himself by drinking poison, will without scruple indulge in continued acts of intemperance; notwithstanding this vice will as generally bring on his ruin in the 'end, as if he had destroyed himself at once by poison. The only difference is, that in one case the milchief works immediately; in the other, by degrees. But though a variety of circumstances may for a while keep off the evil or the good, yet they are still advancing with a steady pace, though perhaps too slow for common observation. Thus, for instance, a man may sometimes live imprudently: he may never look into his affairs, nor compare his expences with his in

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come; yet, if his fortune be considerable, it may be some time before any great inconvenience may appear; and his neighbours, for a long time, may see no difficulties arise in his family. The mischief, however, is inevitably drawing on : his income becomes scanty, debts increase, his creditors make demands, and, in the end, his imprudence becomes his ruin.

It would be easy to fhew the particular milchief that attends every other kind of vice.

With the same ease it might be shewn, how much the practice of every particular virtue is suited to make us happy, and how little such happiness is liable to be disturbed.- -When, therefore, we see the wicked man in prosperityfortunate in his fchemes, and blessed with every thing his soul can desire—what then? To stop here, without making any farther inquiry, would be to stop too foon, and to form a judgment before we have all the circumstances of the case. His prosperity may, all this while, be a delusion; and the man may, in fact, be heaping up a flowpaced misery to himself, instead of happiness. David was convinced of this great truth, and gives us a very expressive description of it:-“ I was grieved,” says he, “ at the wicked, I

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