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THE

MOURNER SHAPEET:

AN

OFFERING OF SYMPATHY

FOR

BEREAVED FRIENDS

SELECTED FROM AMBRICAN POETS,

BY JOHN KEESE.

"They have not perished-No!
Kind words, remember'd voices, once so sweet,

Smiles, radiant long ago,
And features, the great soul's apparent seat;

All shall come back, each tic
or pure affection shall be knit again;

Alone shall evil die,
And sorrow dwell a prisoner in thy reign."

BOSTON:
GOULD AND LINCOLN.

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Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1844,

BY GOULD, KENDALL & LINCOLN, In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of Massachusette.

PREFACE.

It is a trite and common observation, that the Poet is a being pre-eminent for his sorrows; denied the luxuries of life; unfortunate in his attachments, and signal in his bereavements. This is generally true: but few perceive the beautiful philosophy slumbering under this sad category of woes. These are the things that fit him for his mission ; for this cause came he into the world, namely, to suffer - that through him otherg might rejoice. The iron must first enter his own soul, ere he can understand the low wailings of humanity its“ groanings that cannot be uttered.”

The Poet is the interpreter of the human heart - the expounder of its mysteries. An utterance is given to him, which is denied to others, even although their feelings may be akin to his own. Through him Truth speaks; and wild or wayward as may seem her revelations, yet it is the common sentiment, the universal emotion, she speaks ; she gives the germ of a nobler principle, the incentive to a higher hope.

In times of bereavement, the mind often becomes utterly depressed and bewildered at its inability of expression, and it turns instinctively to the language of another; to “the deep, sad harmonies that haunt the breast of the Poet," who has foreshadowed a portraiture of our own hearts; and we are comforted by the assuratrce it gives, that our state is not peculiar. In our weakness of grief, we are apt to feel as if alone; as if set apart as a mark for the shafts of adversity ; but we now learn the fact, that we are only one of the great brotherhood of sorrow.

These truths have been very strongly impressed upon the Editor, in making this little compilation, quickened

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