Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

NAUTICAL MAGAZINE,

1876.

NAUTICAL MAGAZINE

FOR 1876.

NEW SERIES.

A JOURNAL OF PAPERS

ON SUBJECTS CONNEOTED WITH

MARITIME AFFAIRS.

THE SEAS BUT JOIN THE NATIONS THEY DIVIDE."

VOLUME XLV.

London:

SIMPKIN, MARSHALL & co., STATIONERS HALL COURT;

AND
J. D. POTTER, 31, POULTRY.

LONDON:

PRINTED BY PEWTRESS AND CO.,

Steam Printing Works, 15, GREAT QUEEN STREET, LINCOLN'S INx FIELDS, W.C.

THE

NAUTICAL MAGAZINE.

VOLUME XLV.- No. I.

JANUARY, 1876.

SHIPOWNERS: THE FEW AND THE MANY.

T H E Haytians have a proverb that combination is stronger So than witchcraft.” A writer in an American contemporary

observes thereon that “only good motives and purposes will Como combine. The selfish, which are the sinful and predatory motives, are all distrustful, and therefore incapable of acting in concert.” Again, Lord Lytton observes in “ Kenelm Chillingly” that “it is a wonderful proof of the wisdom of Providence that whenever any large number of its creatures forms a community or class, a secret element of disunion enters into the hearts of the individuals forming the congregation, and prevents their co-operating heartily and effectually for their common interest.” And Curran, when speaking on the subject of the absence of co-operation, observed that “ if all the spiders in this commonwealth were to attack me in a body I should fall a victim to their combined nippers.”

The above array of quotations is intended to draw the attention of our readers to various aspects of combination. Seeing, as we may now do, in this country many combinations of an exceedingly questionable character, we are unable to agree with our American contemporary that “only good motives and purposes will combine;" but, on the other hand, indeed, we have daily evidence of the truth of Lord Lytton's words as to the power of “ secret elements of disunion ” in many classes. For ourselves, we are disposed to agree with Curran as to the mighty power of combination when properly organised, and its purposes properly executed, without regard as to whether those purposes are good or bad.

VOL. XLV.

« AnteriorContinuar »