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huge voice like thunder; and little Golden-hair had crushed the soft cushion of the middle-sized bear.

“SOMEBODY HAS BEEN SITTING IN MY CHAIR,” said the middle-sized bear in a middle voice.

66 SOMEBODY HAS BEEN SITTING IN MY CHAIR AND HAS BROKEN IT DOWN,” said the little wee bear in his little wee voice.

The three bears now felt sure that there was some one in the house, and they went upstairs to their sleeping-room to search further.

“ SOMEBODY HAS BEEN LYING ON MY BED,” said the great huge bear; for little Goldenhair had tumbled the bed and put the pillow out of its place.

“ SOMEBODY HAS BEEN LYING ON MY BED,” said the middle-sized bear; for little Golden-hair had also tumbled this bed very much.

" SOMEBODY HAS BEEN LYING ON MY BED AND HERE SHE IS," said the little wee bear with his little shrill voice. Golden-hair had not been roused from her sleep by the loud voices of the great huge bear and the middle-sized bear, but the little voice of the wee bear was so sharp and shrill that it awoke little Golden-hair at once.

When she saw the three bears in the room, and close to the side of the bed in which she was sleeping, she was very much frightened. She started up and ran to the window, which was open, and jumped out. The three bears went to the window to look after her, and saw her running into the woods. But she never came back to their house and they never saw her again.

THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.

This is the house that Jack built.

This is the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the maiden all forlorn,
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the cock that crowed in the morn,
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the farmer sowing his corn,
That kept the cock that crowed in the morn,
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.

LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.

In a very pretty village, far away, there once lived a nice little girl. She was

one of the sweetest children ever seen.

Her mother loved her very much, and her grandmother said that she was the light of her eyes and the joy of her heart.

To show her love for the child, this good old dame had made her a little red hood, and after a time the little girl was known as Little Red Riding Hood.

One day her mother baked some cakes and made some fresh butter. “Go,” she said to Little Red Riding Hood, “and take this cake and a pot of butter to your grandmother; for she is ill in bed.”

Little Red Riding Hood was a willing child, and liked to be useful ; and, besides, she loved her grandmother dearly.

So she put the things in a basket, and at once set out for the village, on the other side of the wood, where her grandmother lived.

Just as she came to the edge of the wood, Little Red Riding Hood met a wolf, who said to her, “Good morning, Little Red Riding Hood.”

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