Foucault and the Government of Disability

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Shelley Lynn Tremain
University of Michigan Press, 2010 M02 22 - 362 páginas

Foucault and the Government of Disability is the first book-length investigation of the relevance and importance of the ideas of Michel Foucault to the field of disability studies-and vice versa. Over the last thirty years, politicized conceptions of disability have precipitated significant social change, including the landmark Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990, the redesign of urban landscapes, the appearance of closed-captioning on televisions, and the growing recognition that disabled people constitute a marginalized and disenfranchised constituency.

The provocative essays in this volume respond to Foucault's call to question what is regarded as natural, inevitable, ethical, and liberating, while they challenge established understandings of Foucault's analyses and offer fresh approaches to his work. The book's roster of distinguished international contributors represents a broad range of disciplines and perspectives, making this a timely and necessary addition to the burgeoning field of disability studies.

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Contenido

An Introduction Shelley Tremain
1
I Epistemologies and Ontologies
25
II Histories
131
III Governmentalities
189
IV Ethics and Politics
279
Contributors
329
Index
333
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Acerca del autor (2010)

Shelley L. Tremain holds a Ph.D. in Philosophy and has taught in Canada, the U.S., and Australia.

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