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of his beloved wife some five years ago and in his subsequent declining health. Though he bore that affliction with the greatest fortitude, I think all his friends feel that it was that shock which eventually caused his own death before he had yet reached old age.

He was a changed man from that day, the buoyancy and brightness of his life had gone out and he gradually declined in health until those of us who saw him in June last before he left the city felt that the end could not be far off. We can rejoice that it came as quietly and peacefully as so good and kindly a life deserved.

In the beautiful and luxurious home of his daughter, where he received every possible care and attention, situated on a high bluff, overlooking the placid waters of the Merrimac, on a porch shaded by branching forest trees and trailing vines, he sat day by day through the summer months, until the waters of his own life had run out and his warm kindly heart had ceased to beat, brave, calm, and playful even, to the end. In the ancestral burying place of his wife's family, beside her he had loved so well and who had been so fitting and true a helpmeet to him, it was my privilege to lay him with the last rites of that holy Church of which he had been so true a son.

And you and I, my brothers, have gathered here to-day to honor the memory of this man. We have placed these stones on the walls of this edifice, whose existence is so largely due to him, and near the spot where Sunday by Sunday since they were first erected he has been a constant worshipper, to be a memorial of him. It is the sort of monument I am sure he would have liked to have had. And coming as it has, as the gift of those friends and associates whose society he so enjoyed, it would have been a peculiar gratification to him. It will keep green in this parish the memory of what he was and did so long as these stones shall last, and may it be an inspiration to men of coming generations to be like him.

In speaking of him I have tried not to draw an ideal character as so many eulogists are tempted to do. I have simply striven to give you a true and faithful account of one who, like us all,

had his faults and failures, but who at the same time had so many fine, attractive and really noble characteristics, that he made us love him while he was with us and deeply to mourn and deplore his loss.

And now that he has passed from us, can we believe that he has ceased to be? Can anyone believe that that distinct entity, that personality, with its individual traits and faculties has been destroyed? In this age when the latest science has taught us that no matter and no force is ever lost, is it supposable that that greatest force we know and which cannot be transmitted into any other force, the mind and character of man, should absolutely perish? The human race instinctively through all its generations and in every place has believed in immortality and nothing in the last science has disproved, but rather substantiates, that belief, a belief which our holy religion, the greatest gospel the world has ever received, has brought to light, confirmed and established. So we believe that those who have passed from us have not ceased to be. They have simply passed into another state, a state as different doubtless from that we are in now, as our present condition differs from that of the embryo in which we once were. A higher state, one of freedom from fleshly burden, of progress, rest and refreshment. We

“ trust that those we call the dead
Are breathers of an ampler day,
For ever nobler ends."

And so, as we bring our tribute of affection and seek to perpetuate the memory of one whom we honored and whose companionship we valued, it is not as if he were only a memory, as if he had passed out of our lives forever. “In the confidence of the certain faith, in the comfort of the reasonable, religious and holy hope" of the Christian, we can look forward to a reunion, to the taking up again under higher, finer conditions, our intercourse and recementing our friendship with him, and those, whom we “have loved long since and lost awhile."

Evacuation-Day Address, washington's Crossing on the Delaware,

June 14, 1902.

Committee on Celebration of Evacuation

Day.

1902,

ALEXANDER WILSON RUSSELL, JR., Vice-Chairman. HON. HARMAN YERKES,

WILLIAM HEYWARD MYERS, BRIG.-GEN. MOTT HOOTEN, U. S. A., CHARLES HENRY JONES, Ex-Officio, HON. SAM'L W. PENNYPACKER, LL.D., RICHARD RANDOLPH PARRY, WILLIAM HENRY BROWN,

GEORGE STEPTOE WASHINGTON, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN HART,

SAMUEL MARSHALL, HENRY WIKOFF BIRKEY, M.D.,

FRANK DELAPLAINE GREEN, THOMAS DAUGHERTY,

JOHN PRICE WETHERILL, HAROLD MONTGOMERY SILL,

CHARLES WILLIAM Potts, JAMES WATTS MERCUR,

Walter LINCOLN HENWOOD, MASON GALLOWAY WORTH,

Rev. ELLISTON JOSEPH PEROT, JAMES PATRIOT WILSON FRAZER, FREDERICK WISTAR MORRIS, R. FRANCIS WOOD,

THOMAS HAND BALL, THOMAS WORCESTER WORRELL, Rev. M. REED MINNICH, LAWRENCE TAYLOR PAUL,

OGDEN DUNGAN WILKINSON, GEORGE ANTHONY HEYL,

FRANCIS CHURCHILL WILLIAMS, THOMAS ADAMS ROBINSON,

WILLIAM ALDEN JAMES, ASHBEL WELCH,

JOHN EDGAR Fretz, M.D., JENNINGS HOOD,

WILLIAM STEWART WALLACE,
JOEL JACKSON BAILY,

WILLIAM FINLEY WILLIAMSON,
SAMUEL WHITEHILL LATTA, M.D., CHARLES MAXWELL CLEMENT,
LT.-COL. B. REEVES RUSSELL, U.S.M.C., SALLOWS DUNLAP,
JACOB SHOTWELL ROBESON,

FRANK EVANS TOWNSEND,
HENRY GRIFFITH KEASBY,

ROBERT MITCHELL, JAMES LEE PATTON,

SAMUEL BABCOCK CROWELL,
WILLIAM EDWARD HELME,

GEORGE WOLF REILY,
JOHN ROGERS MORRIS, Committee.

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