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(ACT of March 3d, 1819.) of the United States, for building light houses, erecting beacons or land inarks, and placing light vessels or boats, on the following sites or shoals, to wit:

A light house on Long Island Head, and a beacon or land mark on Half Way Rock, in Boston Bay; and also a light house on Bird's Island, in Buzzard's Bay, in the state of Massachusetts.

A light house on Galloo Island, near the outlet of Lake Ontario, in the state of New York.

A light house, at a proper place, at or between the mouth of Grand River, in the state of Ohio, and the mouth of Detroit River, in the territory of Michigan.

Three light houses, on the following sites; one on the Bodkin, one on North Point, and one on Sparrow's Point, in the state of Maryland.

A light house on Windmill Point, at the mouth of Rappahannock river, or a light vessel or boat on the Wolf Trap Shoals, if the latter shall be deemed preferable to a light house on Windmill Point; a light house on Craney Island, at the mouth of Elizabeth River, and a light vessel, or boat, on Willoughby's Spit, between Lynnhaven Bay and Hampton Roads, in the state of Virginia: And a beacon, or land mark, on Wolf Island, near the port of Darien, in the state of Georgia.

62. Sec. li. It shall be the duty of the secretary of the treasury to cause three buoys to be placed in such manner as to mark out the channel leading into the harbour of Boston, and one buoy to be placed on West Island Ledge, in Buzzard's Bay; a spindle, or buoy, on the outer rock of the reef running from Cochney's Island to Eastern Norwalk Island; another spindle, or buoy, on the reef running about southwest from the western point of the Western Norwalk Island; and a spindle on the rock off the point of Fairweather Island, in the state of Connecticut: And twenty buoys in the Chesapeake Bay, and Patapsco River, for designating the shoals and channel, in the state of Maryland.

63. Sec. Ill. It shall be the duty of the secretary of the treasury to cause a pier to be carried out to nine feet water, at the light house, heretofore authorised to be erected at the mouth of the Mississippi, and also that he cause the present wood tower at the Seguin light house, in the state of Massachusetts, to be replaced with one of stone.

64. SEC. VII. The secretary of the treasury, in case he shall deem it expedient and proper, may cause the light house heretofore authorised to be erected on the south point of Sapelo Island, to be changed to, and placed on, Wolfe's Island.

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ACT of February 20, 1811. 4 Bioren, 328. An act to enable the people of the territory of Orleans to form a constitution and

state government, and for the admission of such state into the union, on an equal footing with the original states; and for other purposes.

1. Sec. 1. The inhabitants of all that part of the territory or country ceded under the name of Louisiana, by the treaty made at Paris, on the thirtieth day of April, one thousand eight hundred and three, between the United States and France, contained within the following limits, that is to say: beginning at the mouth of the river Sabine, thence, by a line to be drawn along the middle of the said river, including all islands, to the thirty-second degree of latitude; thence, due north to the northernmost part of the thirty third degree of north latitude; thence, along the said parallel of latitude, to the river Mississippi; thence, down the said river, to the river Iberville; and from thence, along the middle of the said river and lakes Maurepas and Ponchartrain, to the gulf of Mexico; thence, bounded by the said gulf, to the place of beginning; including all islands within three leagues of the coast, be, and they are hereby authorised to form for themselves a constitution and state government, and to assume such name as they may deem proper, under the provisions, and upon the conditions, hereinafter mentioned.

2. Sec. 11. (Representatives to form a convention, to be chosen.]

3. Sec. I. The members of the convention, when duly elected, are hereby authorised to meet, at the city of New Orleans, on the first Monday of November next; which convention, when met, shall first determine, by a majority of the whole number elected, whether it be expedient or not, at that time, to form a constitution and state government, for the people within the said territory; and if it be determined to be expedient, then the CONvention shall, in like manner declare, in behalf of the people of the said territory, that it adopts the constitution of the United States; whereupon the said convention shall be, and hereby is, authorised to form a constitution and state government for the people of the said territory: Provided, The constitution to be formed, in virtue of the authority herein given, shall be republican, and consistent with the constitution of the United States; that jt shall contain the fundamental principles of civil and religious liberty; chat it shall secure to the citizen the trial by jury in all criminal cases, and the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus, con(ACT of February 20th, 1811.) formably to the provisions of the constitution of the United States, and that after the admission of the said territory of Orleans as a state, into the Union, the laws which such state may pass shall be promulgated, and its records of every description shall be preser: ved, and its judicial and legislative written proceedings conducted, in the language in which the laws and the judicial and legis. lative written proceedings of the United States are now published and conducted: And provided also, That the said convention shall provide by an ordinance, irrevocable without the consent of the United States, that the people inhabiting the said territory do agree and declare, that they forever disclaim all right or title to the waste or unappropriated lands, lying within the said territory; and that the same shall be and remain at the sole and entire disposition of the United States; and, moreover, that each and every tract of land, sold by congress, shall be and remain exempt from any tax, laid by the order or under the authority of the state, whether for state, county, township, parish, or any other purpose whatever, for the term of five years, from and after the respective days of the sales thereof; and that the lands, belonging to citizens of the United States, residing without the said state, shall never be taxed higher than the lands belonging to persons residing there. in; and that no taxes shall be imposed on lands the property of the United States; and that the river Mississippi, and the navi. gable rivers and waters leading into the same, or into the gulf of Mexico, shall be common highways, and forever free, as well to the inhabitants of the said state as to other citizens of the United States, without any tax, duty, impost or toll, therefor, imposed by the said state. :

4. Sec. iv. In case the convention shall declare its assent, in behalf of the people of the said territory, to the adoption of the constitution of the United States, and shall form a constitution and state government for the people of the said territory of Orleans, the said convention, as soon thereafter as may be, is hereby required to cause to be transmitted to congress the instrument by which its assent to the constitution of the United States is thus given and de.' clared, and also, a true and attested copy of such constitution, or frame of state government, as shall be formed and provided by said convention; and if the same shall not be disapproved by congress, at their next session after the receipt thereof, the said state shall be admitted into the union, upon the same footing with the original states.

5. Sec. v. Five per centum of the net proceeds of the sales of the lands of the United States, after the first day of January, shall be applied to lying out and constructing public roads and levees in the said state, as the legislature thereof may direct.

ACT of April 8, 1812. 4 Bioren, 402.
An act for the admission of the state of Louisiana into the union, and to extend

the laws of the United States to the said state.

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6. Whereas the representatives of the people of all that part of the territory or country ceded, under the name of " Louisiana,” by the treaty made at Paris, on the thirtieth day of April, one thousand eight hundred and three, between the United States and France, contained within the following limits; that is to say: beginning at the mouth of the river Sabine; thence, by a line to be drawn along the middle of said river, including all islands to the thirty-second degree of latitude; thence, due north, to the northernmost part of the thirty third degree of north latitude; thence, along the said parallel of latitude, to the river Mississippi, thence, down the said river, to the river Iberville; and from thence, along the middle of the said river, and lakes Maurepas and Ponchartrain, to the gulf of Mexico; thence, bounded by the said gulf, to the place of beginning; including all islands within three leagues of the coast; did, on the twenty-second day of January, one thousand eight hundred and twelve, form for themselves a constitution and state government, and give to the said state the name of the state of Louisiana, in pursuance of an act of congress,

entitled An act to enable the people of the territory of Orleans to form a constitution and state government, and for the admission of the said state into the Union, on an equal footing with the original states, and for other purposes:" And the said constitution having been transmitted to congress, and by them being hereby approved; therefore,

7. Sec. I. The said state shall be one, and is hereby declared to be one, of the United States of America, and admitted into the Union on an equal footing with the original states, in all respects whatever, by the name and title of the state of Louisiana: Provided, That it shall be taken as a condition upon which the said state is incorporated in the union, that the river Mississippi, and the navigable rivers and waters leading into the same, and into the gulf of Mexico, shall be common highways, and for. ever free, as well to the inhabitants of the said state as to the in. habitants of other states, and the territories of the United States, without any tax, duty, impost, or toll, therefor, imposed by the said state; and that the above condition, and also all other the condition and terms contained in the third section of the act, the title whereof is hereinbefore recited, shall be considered, deemed, and taken, fundamental conditions and terms, upon which the said state is incorporated in the union.

8. Sec. 11. Until the next general census and appointment of representatives, the said state shall be entitled to one representative in the house of representatives of the United States; and all the laws of the United States, not locally inapplicable, shall be extended to the said state, and shall have the same force and effect within the same as elsewhere within the United States.

(ACT of March 3d, 1820.) 9. Sec. lll. Nothing in this act shall be construed to repeal the fourth section of an act, entitled “An act for laying and col. lecting duties on imports and tonnage within the territories ceded to the United States, by the treaty of the thirtieth of April, one thousand eight hundred and three, between the United States and the French republic, and for other purposes;” and the collection district shall be and remain as thereby established.

(See DUTIES, local regulations, 39, ante page 291.]

ACT of April 14, 1812. 4 Bioren, 409.

An act to enlarge the limits of the state of Louisiana. 10. Sec. 1. In case the legislature of the state of Louisiana, shall consent thereto, all that tract of country comprehended within the following bounds, to wit: beginning at the junction of the Iberville, with the river Mississippi; thence, along the middle of the Iberville, the river Amite and the lakes Maurepas and Pontchartrain, to the eastern mouth of the Pearl river; thence, up the easter branch of the Pearl river to the thirty-first degree of north latitude; thence, along the said degree of latitude to the river Mississippi; thence, down the said river to the place of beginning; shall bícome and form a part of the said state of Louisiana, and be subject to the constitution and laws thereof, in the same manner, and for all intents and purposes; as if it had been included within the original boundaries of the said state.

Sec. 11. It shall be incumbent upon the legislature of the state of Louisiana, in case they consent to the incorporation of the territory afuresaid, within their limits, at the first session to make provision by law for the representation of the said territory in the legislature of the state, upon the principles of the constitution, and for the securing to the people of the said territory equal rights, privileges, benefits, and advantages, with those enjoyed by the people of the other part of the state; which law shall be liable to revision, modification, and amendment by congress, and also in the manner provided for the amendment of the state constitution, but shall not be liable to change or amendment by the legislature of the state.

MAINE.

ACT of March 3, 1820, Pamphlet edit. 11.
An act for the admission of the state of Maine into the Union.

Whereas, by an act of the state of Massachusetts, passed on

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