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the public, for the purchaser would have no scruple in making the most of his bargain—I took therefore a course which I judged unexceptionable, ordering my overseer to let out the stock or the Farms usual in that part of the Country for a share of the Increase and to be returned at the End of three or four years.

When I revisited Schenectady last Week, I enquired how this Business had been conducted. My Directions I found had, in general, been obeyed. In some instances he had contracted for specie instead of the Increase or produce, and one Mare he had sold for a Note of Hand payable at the End of a year with Interest—I expressed Disatisfaction and he excused himself by alleging that the Farmers would not agree for the value in produce but insisted on giving money and that this had been the practice. It was in vain to complain farther at what had been done. I however gave him orders to sell the remaining Stock at vendue and for Continental Money if it could not be put out on the Farms I first directed. My Furniture and other Effects he had no authority to sell except a few trifling Articles I believe under the value of five pounds which were not worth removing.

It has been farther reported that I left my Goods in the Hands of Mr. Robinson to be sold only for specie. It is most untrue. Mrs. Duane requested him to exchange a pattern for a Stuff Gown for Diaper for her Family. No Opportunity offering, one of the Neighbors begged she might have it agreeing to give 66/ [shillings] in specie of which Mrs. Duane accepted. I solemnly declare I knew Nothing of it till several months after the Transaction or it should have been returned.

Upon the whole I have not during the present contest traded for the value of one Farthing except the sale of one share for Continental Money

* [illegible] trading. I have not received one penny rent, nor have by any Means earned the value of five pounds by my private

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Business on the contrary, I have supported myself in my public character with the Allowance of the State: the ready Money of which I happen to be possessed when the War commenced, the Continental Money paid me in discharge of old Debts, and Money to no inconsiderable amount, which I have borrowed.

If you are satisfied with the Truth of this Relation, you are called upon by every Motive to remove the Impression which your Report has made to my prejudice. If you want further Conviction I am ready to justify myself in the clearest, most explicit Terms. I shall for the present say Nothing farther: than that I am, Sir, your most humble Servant, Mitchell Esq.

JAMES DUANE To His WIFE.

New York 30th September 1789. For Mrs Duane.

You may remember, my dearest Polly, that I could not see you set sail on account of the Common Council which was then assembling. I had hardly taken my seat at the board when I received a Message that Col. Hamilton wished to speak with me. He asked me to walk into a private room and then to my great Surprize informed me that he was sent by the President of the United States to know whether I would accept the office of District Judge. I told him as I never had solicited, expected or even wished for any office from the President, knowing that he was hard pressed by numberless applicants who stood more in need than myself, I could not on a sudden give him an answer. He told me it was not necessary and that I might take that day to consider of it. On enquiring from him I found these were the circumstances attending the affair. Very great interest had been ma for the Chief Justice Morris, for Judge Yates and Mr. Harrison. When the point was to be decided Col. Hamil

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ton and Mr. Jay were present. The President observed that he conceived a more respectable appointment than either of the gentlemen recommended could be made and named me. Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Jay declared that they were of the same sentiments : on which the President replied that he was pleased to find that his opinion was confirmed by theirs, and Col. Hamilton was requested to deliver the above message to me. After the common council adjourned I found I was to decide on a question of great moment which greatly concerned my family without an opportunity of consulting with you or any of the children. I communicated it to the Baron* alone who was very earnest that I should accept it. Both offices I consider as highly honorable. They are equally

. profitable. The Judges place is held under the Commission of the President of the United States during good behavior; the Mayor's annually renewed at the whim of a council of appointment. The Judge's office permits him to reside in any part of the State, and affords a sufficient portion of leisure for his private affairs and recreation and study, the Mayor's demands the most slavish confinement and a waste of time on insignificant matters, as well as care and assiduity on those which are important. In short if he is upright, and, as he ought to be, easy of access, he cannot call an hour of his time his own. These are the chief considerations which with the honorable manner of the office was conferred on me induced me to return an answer in the evening that I accepted it. As soon as it was known that the Senate approved of my nomination I sent a resignation of the Mayoralty to the Governour. The Council of appointment met the day after and appointed Col. Varick, who relinquished the place of State's attorney, as my successor. The 14th Instant he will be qualified and I clear of it. Till then I must administer it.

While I am writing this letter I receive an invitation to

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*Baron Steuben.

dine with the President to morrow. I presume I shall then receive my commission which I owe solely to his regard for and good opinion of me. If I am not flattered, my promo tion gives satisfaction, at the same time the citizens express their applause of my conduct as their chief Magistrate. My District Court will be opened on the first Tuesday in November and held every three months. Besides which I am associated with the Judges of the Supreme Court in the Circuit of this State to be held the beginning of April and October yearly, at Albany and New York alternately.

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Your faithful and affectionate husband

James DUANE. (To be continued.)

A SOUTHERN SULKY RIDE IN 1837.

The JOURNAL OF Wm. H. WILLS.

(Concluded in this number.)

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I

[The following tables of distances and expenses, prepared by Mr. Wills, present an interesting view of traveling in those days.) From Tarboro, To

Belchers

18

589 Moses Farmers

24
Bainbridge

9 598 J. Hinnons

21 45
Fair Grove

610
Smithfield
12 57 Johnstons,

619 Lees

9
66 Tallahassee

18 637
Averysboro,
19 85 Quincy

22

659 Fayetteville

25 ΙΙΟ
Vernon

21

680 Mrs. Nelsons

15 125
Robertsons

19 699
McFalls
18 143 Marianna

705 Jno. Hamers'

19 162

E. C. Bellamys 9 714
Bennetville

5 167
Gammons,

26

740 Society Hill

14
181 Woodville

I 741
Parrots

16
197
Columbia

II

752 J. Peebles, 20 217 | Perrymans

14

766 Camden, 15 232

To

766 Rabbs

17 249
Franklin

II 777
Columbia

17 266 Fort Gaines Poindexters

21
287
Wash's

IO
Watsons

19 306
Georgetown

II

799 Wise's

18
324
Irwinton

800 Augusta

15 339
Georgetown

801 Palmers'

18 357
Lumkin

25

826 Jordans

17 374

Woolforke's Ferry 23 819
McQuotty's

3 377
Fort Mitchell

850 Hardwicks,

18
395
Columbus

IO 860
Fish's

17 412
Elliotts

II
To
412 McClennon's

21

892 Oconee River

18 430
Tuskegee

13 905 Mrs. Adams'

4 434
Tallassee

15 Hawards

13 447
Loftons

6 926 Hawkinsville

25 472
Wetumpka

17 943
Dees'
13 485 Montgomery

14 957 Berrien

14 499
Mount Meigs

13 970
Slades
15 514 Tuskegee

30 1000 Parkers 22 536 Mrs. Thomes

1012 Smiths

II
547 Manghams

21 1032
Nellons'
2 549 Elliotts

1033 Shores 22 571 Columbus

II 1044

778 788

I
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bow

871

920

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