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Regretting the prospect that Calhoun will “be jockeyed out of the nomination” by those who control the party organization.

“Dam[n] the Banks. I wish they were all burnt. It will not do to give them our sympathy. They have ruined the country & I don't believe men can remain free or honest if they are not put down—I trust in God you will not lend your name to resuscitate their waning power.”

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From Dixon H. Lewis.
To-R. K. Crallé.
Dated—House of Representatives, May 30, 1842.

The Salisbury, N. C., Convention "was very large about
4,000, but few counties were represented particularly in the
Eastern part of the State. Nine tenths were for Calhoun &
came to nominate him—Strange Brown, Cannon, Holmes, &
about a dozen others were opposed to him, but said they
would do for him at a proper time if he was the choice of
the State, Fisher thought it best not to force as he could
easily have done, a nomination, as so few counties were rep-
resented.”

The Rhode Island question is being agitated to "head Calhoun." Lewis then states Calhoun's position as follows: "He is as you know a free suffrage man, but don't think this government can recognize the Dorr Party as the State, & that if called on to comply with the guaranty in the constitution must recognize the legal Government until legally superceded-& that to concede to this government a discretion in the matter, would be to subject State constitutions to the control of the federal government. Besides their Doctrines lead to the principle, that the majority are supreme over the constitutions & must be so recognized hereHe says if the Constitution has provided no mode for its amendment it must be amended legally by the assent of the Actual Government, & until such assent is had, no amendment is

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legal but revolutionary;" and says that the southern democrats agree with him but that the northern and western democrats take the other view.

From-Dixon H. Lewis.
To-R. K. Crallé.
Dated-House of Representatives, May 31, 1842.

The Rhode Island question and the failure of North Carolina to nominate Calhoun is embarrassing the Calhoun movement. “An article a little more decisive than yours in favor of Woodbury for the V Presidency, would now do great good, by fixing the North or rather N Hampshire Massachusetts and Maine-We must do enough to put down the matter of course Idea, that Van is to be our candidate for the next time.”

From Dixon H. Lewis.
To-[R. K. Crallé].
Dated-House of Represenatives, June 10, 1842.

Mr. Calhoun has gone to Dahlonega, Ga., to look after his property there on which a rich gold mine has recently developed.

"In the meantime he desires me to answer your letterIn its general spirit I agree but not to the extent that you go -Van enjoys the advantage of being considered the Candidate of the Party First by position as the late candidate. Secondly by being nominated by Missouri & a part of the Democratic Party of Mississippi & other meetings else where. Thirdly by the address of the Whigs in speaking of the Van Buren Party-Fourthly & more than all, by a visit including more than half of the Union, in consequence of which he is spoken of as the candidate already in the field

To this four fifths of his strength may be imputed, & but for the opinion that as a matter of course he is to be the Candidate he would have very little strength. Now you

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may rest assured that unless there is agitation enough to put down this idea, with the aid of Party machinery, it will grow stronger & stronger, the resisting force will grow weaker & more difficult to be rallied.

"It is true all the news we hear from the country is favourable to Calhoun, eminently so—Yesterday a Democratic member from Maryland after an absence of two or three weeks brings the most encouraging news from that State. He has been much among the people & they say Calhoun is the man—Two days since he had a talk with Frank Thomas -& even he told him that he believed Calhoun was the strongest man in Maryalnd. Thomas did not say so, but he left the impression that even he preferred him—Another Democratic member brings the same favorable accounts from North Carolina while in N York & other places to the North everything looks well, but in the absence of any response to this feeling among the people the result will be that each section will take it for granted that it stands alone & is not sustained by other sections, & in that way, they will like the politicians here soon begin to look on Van's nomination as a matter of course & acquiesce in it-I would advise then a cautious movement

"To do this, we need not speak otherwise than kindly of Van, his past services & even his firm adherence to his principles—but is he therefore to be run for a third term, in despite of his former defeat, the fact that a majority of the People are committed against him, that he always wanted popularity, that old issues personal to him will be revived, & that from the present strength of the Democratic Party, the danger of division is increased-particularly by starting an unpopular candidate, in some middle man, who like Genl Harrison will be run for his availability.

"We may urge Mr Calhoun first because he is the choice of a majority of the Democracy. Secondly the moderate men of all parties will be satisfied with him. Thirdly his un

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questioned talents. Four his high administrative capacity contrasting strongly in this with Mr. Van Buren-Fivehis energy not only in administering but in reforming the Government particularly in its expenditures—the injustice to the distinguished men of the party, in holding up any individual's pretensions for twelve years—the one term principle (if necessary) for Mr. Calhoun, a timely appeal to the interests of Buchanan, Wright & Woodbury for the Vice Presidency & &c; &c.”

“Nor need these things all proceed from any one quarter or any one press.”

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From Dixon H. Lewis.
To-R. K. Crallé.

Written on the Prospectus of “The Plebeian." The prospectus is dated New York, June 15, 1842, and the first number is announced for June 27. Levi D. Slamm and Clement Guion sign it.

“This is to be a Calhoun Paper & is the leading organ of the Democracy of the City. We are to give it all the aid, we can, to keep it from out of the Hands of the Enemy.”— Denny Coll.

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From Dixon H. Lewis.
To—R. K. Crallé, Lynchburg, Va.
Dated- Washington, December 28, 1842.
“We are in the midst of the mellee

The Van Buren men are straining every nerve to put down Mr. Calhoun whom they begin now both to fear & hate. Their object is to hurry the Party prematurely into a convention

We propose a Convention in June 1844, the usual time.”

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From-Duff Green.
TOR. K. Crallé.
Dated-Washington, February 8, 1843.

"Van Burens partisans go for an early organization and a convention in August next. The friends of the other candidates for deferring the convention until May or June 1844 and require that it shall then be fairly constituted. They take the ground that it were better to refer the election to Congress than to a packed junta of political demagogues & my own opinion is that if the convention can be delayed until June, the question will be disposed of by the people" in favor of Calhoun.

“There are many reasons why this should be so—When that convention becomes a mere caucus of political party managers it ceases to become an agent of the people, but it is in fact an agent of the managers, whereby they impose upon the people. Instead of a means of ascertaining public sentiment & securing harmony it becomes an instrument to defeat the public will by substituting therefor the creature of faction."

“I have purposely avoided speaking of President Tyler. You know my personal friendship for him, and how much it would have gratified me if he had taken a course which would have secured his reëlection. I fear, however, that he has not done what I am persuaded he might have done, and that it is now too late.”

From-Dixon H. Lewis.
To-R. K. Crallé, Lynchburg, Va.
Dated—Washington, February 10 [1843] (Postmark).

“The time of the Convention settles every thing.May 1844 must not be abandoned, so say to every friend."-Den

ny Coll.

(To be continued.)

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