The life of Shakspeare; enquiries into the originality of his dramatic plots and characters; and essays on the ancient theatres and theatrical usages

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Página 193 - Till thou applaud the deed. Come, seeling night', Scarf up the tender eye of pitiful day, And with thy bloody and invisible hand, Cancel, and tear to pieces, that great bond Which keeps me pale ! — Light thickens ; and the crow Makes wing to the rooky wood : Good things of day begin to droop and drowse, Whiles night's black agents to their preys do rouse.
Página 159 - tis strange : And oftentimes, to win us to our harm, The instruments of darkness tell us truths : Win -us with honest trifles, to betray us In deepest consequence.
Página 65 - I loved the man, and do honour his memory, on this side idolatry, as much as any. He was indeed honest, and of an. open and free nature ; had an excellent phantasy, brave notions, and gentle expressions...
Página 234 - In her days, every man shall eat in safety Under his own vine what he plants ; and sing The merry songs of peace to all his neighbours.
Página 260 - With purple grapes, green figs, and mulberries ; The honey bags steal from the humble-bees, And, for night-tapers, crop their waxen thighs, And light them at the fiery glowworm's eyes...
Página 269 - Flying between the cold moon and the earth, Cupid all arm'd : a certain aim he took At a fair vestal throned by the west, And loos'd his love-shaft smartly from his bow, As it should pierce a hundred thousand hearts : But I might see young Cupid's fiery shaft Quench'd in the chaste beams of the watery moon, And the imperial votaress passed on, In maiden meditation, fancy-free.
Página 254 - He draweth out the thread of his verbosity finer than the staple of his argument.
Página 156 - The night has been unruly : where we lay, Our chimneys were blown down ; and, as they say, Lamentings heard i...
Página 73 - I behold like a Spanish great galleon and an English man-of-war. Master Coleridge, like the former, was built far higher in learning, solid, but slow in his performances. CVL, with the English man-of-war, lesser in bulk, but lighter in sailing, could turn with all tides, tack about, and take advantage of all winds, by the quickness of his wit and invention.
Página 153 - I'll sup. Farewell. Poins. Farewell, my lord. [Exit POINS. P. Hen. I know you all, and will a while uphold The unyok'd humour of your idleness : Yet herein will I imitate the sun, Who doth permit the base contagious clouds ' To smother up his beauty from the world...

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