The Boston School Compendium of Natural and Experimetal Philosophy: Embracing the Elementary Principles of Mechanics, Hydrostatics, Hydraulics, Pneumatics ... with a Description of the Steam and Locomotive Engines

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Marsh, Capen, and Lyon, 1838 - 213 páginas
 

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Página 180 - Venus, a pea on a circle 284 feet in diameter ; the Earth also a pea, on a circle of 430 feet ; Mars, a rather large pin's head, on a circle of 654 feet...
Página 180 - Mars a rather large pin's head, on a circle of 654 feet; Juno, Ceres, Vesta, and Pallas, grains of sand, in orbits of from...
Página 45 - ... of time that the axle describes a small one, therefore the power is increased in the same proportion as the circumference of the wheel is greater than that of the axle. If the velocity of the wheel...
Página 79 - If, in the commencement of this experiment, the balloon be made to have a specific gravity too near that of water, it will not rise of itself, after once reaching the bottom, because the pressure of the water then above it will perpetuate the condensation of the air which caused it to descend. It may even...
Página 203 - If the moon went round the earth in the same plane in which the earth goes round the sun, that is, in the ecliptic, it is plain that the sun would be eclipsed at every new moon ; and the moon would be eclipsed at every full. For at each of these times, these three bodies would be in the same straight line.. But the moon's orbit does not coincide with the ecliptic, but is inclined to it at an angle of about 5° 20'.
Página 24 - drive it off to a distance equal to that through which the first ball fell ; but the motion of A will be stopped, because when it strikes B it receives in return a blow equal to that which it gave, but in a contrary direction, and its motion is thereby stopped, or rather, given to B. Therefore, when a body strikes against another, the quantity of motion communicated to the second body is lost by the first ; but this loss proceeds, not from the blow given by the striking body, but from the reaction...
Página 175 - Each strand 27* is wound on a little less than an inch; in the middle of the horse-shoe it forms three thicknesses of wire; and on the ends, or near the poles, it is wound so as to form six thicknesses.
Página 192 - ... show that heat is produced by the sun's rays only when they act on a calorific medium: they are the cause of the production of heat, by uniting with the matter of fire which is contained in the substances that are heated...
Página 103 - By his admirable contrivance, it has become a thing stupendous alike for its force and its flexibility, — for the prodigious power which it can exert, and the ease, and precision, and ductility, with which that power can be varied, distributed, and applied. The trunk of an elephant, that can pick up a pin or rend an oak, is as nothing to it. It can engrave a seal, and crush masses of obdurate metal before it — draw out, without breaking, a thread as fine as gossamer...
Página 26 - A Circle is a plane figure bounded by a curved line called a circumference, every point of which is equally distant from a point within called the centre.

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