The Muses of Resistance: Laboring-Class Women's Poetry in Britain, 1739-1796

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Cambridge University Press, 1990 M10 26 - 325 páginas
In this original and challenging study, Donna Landry shows how an understanding of the remarkable but neglected careers of laboring-class women poets in the eighteenth century provokes a reassessment of our ideas concerning the literature of the period. Poets such as the washerwoman Mary Collier, the milkwoman Ann Yearsley, the domestic servants Mary Leapor and Elizabeth Hands, the dairywoman Jane Little, and the slave Phillis Wheatley can be seen employing various methods to adapt the conventions of polite verse for the purposes of social criticism. Historically important, technically impressive, and aesthetically innovative, the poetic achievements of these working class- women writers constitute an exciting literary discovery.

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the discourse of workingwomens verse II
11
some problems in feminist literary
56
An English Sappho brilliant young and dead? Mary Leapor laughs
78
workingclass writer
120
The pleasures of the text with a vengeance
152
Domesticating the political and the politics of domesticity
165
the two Elizabeths
186
the marginality of cultural difference
217
revolutions that as yet have no model
254
Notes
281
Index
317
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