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EDITED BY

WILLIAM J. UNWIN, M.A.,

PRINCIPAL OF HOMERTON COLLEGE.

SECOND BOOK.

London :
WARD AND CO., 27, PATERNOSTER ROW.

500.6.171.
Pů 2,

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16 11279 113

1327

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.....................

Norman Line.

Acces. Died. Age. WILLIAM I.... Obtained the Crown by Conquest .....

1066 1087 60 WILLIAM II.. Second son of William I.

1087 1100 43 HENRY I.......) Youngest son of William I...

1100

1135 Third son of Stephen, earl of Blois by STEPHEN ...

1135

1154
daughter of William I. ...,

Plantagenet Line,
HENRY II. S Son of Geoffrey Plantagenet, by Matilda, only U

1154
daughter of Henry I..
RICHARD I.... Eldest surviving son of Henry II.

1189 1199 JOHN ......... Sixth and youngest son of Henry II.

1199 HENRY III.... Eldest son of John

1216 EDWARD I.... Eldest son of Henry III. .....

1272 EDWARD II... Eldest surviving son of Edward I.

1307 EDWARD III.. Eldest son of Edward II.....

1327 RICHARD II. . Son of the Black Prince, eldest son of Edward II 1377

HOUSE OF LANCASTER,
HENRY IV.... Son of John of Gaunt, 4th son of Edward III...... 1399 1413
HENRY V. ... Eldest son of Henry IV. ....

1413 HENRY VI. ... Only son of Henry V. ........

1422
HOUSE OF YORK.
His grandfather, Richard, was son of Edmund,
EDWARDIV.
5th son of Edward III.; and his grandmother,

1461 1483
Anne, was great grand-daughter of Lionel,
3rd son of Edward III. ....

........... EDWARD V.... Eldest son of Edward IV. ..

1483 1483 / 11 RICHARD III. Younger brother of Edward IV..

1483 1485 42 Tudor Line. His father was Edmund, eldest son of Owen Tudor

and Queen Catherine, widow of Henry V.; and HENRY VII.

1485 1509 62 his mother was Margaret Beaufort, great

grand-daughter of John of Gaunt HENRY VIII. Only surviving son of Henry VII. ........

1509 1547 55 EDWARD VI.. Son of Henry VIII. by Jane Seymour ...

| 1547 1553 16 MARY .........

Daughter of Henry VÌII. by Catherine of Arragon 1553 1558
ELIZABETH .
Daughter of Henry VIII, by Anne Boleyn ......... 1558 1603

Stuart Line.
Son of Mary Queen of Scots, grand-daughter of)
JAMES I. ...3

James IV. and Margaret, eldest daughter of | 1603 1625 58

Henry VII. ..
CHARLES I.... Only surviving son of James 1. ...

1625 COMMONWLTH OLIVER CROMWELL.

1649 1660 CHARLES II.. Eldest son of Charles I.

1660 1685 JAMES II. Only surviving son of Charles I........

1685 1702 Son of William of Nassau, by Mary, daughter of) WILL. III.

1702 Charles I. ......

1688 MARY ....... Eldest daughter of James II.

1694 ANNE Daughter of James II. ........

1702
HOUSE OF HANOVER.

Eldest son of the Duke of Hanover, by S
GEORGE I....3 daughter of Frederic V., king of Bohemia, and El 1714

Elizabeth, daughter of James I. .......
GEORGE II. ... Only son of George I. .....

1727 1760 77 GEORGE III... Grandson of George II. .....

1760 1820 GEORGE IV.... Eldest son of George III..

1820 1830 WILLIAM IV. Third son of George III. ...

1830 1837 VICTORIA ...

s Daughter of Edward, duke of Kent, 4th son of 7
George III. ...

1837

1649

114

DUDA

1727 67

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THE HOLY SCRIPTURES ..............

THE MILLENNIUM
THE MUMMY ............................

A SNOW STORM
MORNING HYMN IN PARADISE

THE RAINBOW ...

COMMERCE .......

TRUE FREEDOM ......

EXCELSIOR ......

39 THE SEA

NOAH AND THE DELUGE ...... ......... 47 | SONNETS.

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TRAINING SCHOOL READER.

SECTION I.
LESSON I.—MONDAY.

DIVISION OF LABOUR. THE cotton, of which a coloured neckcloth or a piece of lace is formed, may be supposed to have been grown by some Tenessee or Louisiana planter. For this purpose he must have emploved labourers, in preparing the soil and planting and attending to the shrub, for more than a year before its pod ripened. When the pod became ripe, considerable labour, assisted by ingenious machinery, was necessary to extricate the seeds from the wool. The fleece thus cleaned was carried down the Mississippi to New Orleans, and there sold to a cotton factor. The price at which it was sold must have been sufficient, in the first place, to repay to the planter the wages which had been paid by him to all those employed in its production and carriage; and, secondly, to pay him a profit proportioned to the time which had elapsed between the payment of those wages and the sale of the cotton; or, in other words, to remunerate him for his abstinence in having so long deprived himself of the use of his money, or of the pleasure which he might have received from the labour of his work-people, if, instead of cultivating cotton, he had employed them in contributing to his own immediate enjoyment. The New Orleans factor, after keeping it perhaps five or six months, sold it to a Liverpool merchant. Scarcely any labour could have been expended on it at New Orleans, and, in the absence of accidental circumstances, its

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