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pic Tl»ey am wrong to the people of this state, they are wrong to the people of the United States, and they are wrong to the whole world. The whole world is looking anxiously to the great progress of free principles, and the establishment of free governments not only in the United States, but in all Europe. A mighty struggle is going on in the popular feeling in the old world, which is crumbling the thrones of despots to ruins. The old corruptions and ancient abuses are passing away, and the spirit of liberty is struggling with an energy that will be irresistible wherever its votaries are united in defence of its sacred cause. That spirit is onward, and it is marching to triumph. It is dear to the heart of every American, and rather than to yield or abandon it, he would tear that heart from his bosom, and throw it, a bleeding sacrifice, at the feet of his country. For one, I would do it.

Mr. PRESTON. &s it is rather late, I would not now attempt to detain the committee but for the singular ground taken by the gentleman from Madison. It is^a position so different from what he has heretofore occupied on this floor, and the arguments he used are so unfounded, so unjust, that I feel, though the youngest representative from Louisville, bound, on this floor, to point out the errors which have characterized them, to denounce them as unfit to be entertained by this convention, and as contrary to every true principle of liberty, and to every right which should belong to" the citizen. What is the proposition in the report of the committee? Is it iniquitous, is it unjust, does it speak to a section, does it apply only to Louisville, or is it in its operation as wide spread as the state of Kentucky, and as fair as the character of the bold race that live upon its soil. This proposition does give Louisville a representation in both houses of the general assembly, which technicalities in former times deprived us of. Aud the legal acumen which mark many in the house has been exerted in order to inflict a vital stab on the true principle of representation. What is that principle? Representation rests on three grounds. It can be based on territorial extent, it can be on property, and it can be upon the free hearts and bold arms of our countrymen, upon numbers, upon population, and it must be upon one of these, or upon combinations of them. Kentucky was the first state in this confederacy that asserted the proud doctrine that the principle of representation was based on territorial extent, or upon property,but upon the number of her brave citizens. That it was the free bodies and the free minds of Kentucky, and not the hoards of an Astor's wealth, or the extent of a Van Reus selaer's possession that was to be represented. In England, they adopted, as my eloquent friend from Henderson has stated, the "principle of territorial extent, aud what was the creature of that infamous principle, for all infamous principles will breed monsters in the progress of time. It was the borough system. It caused old Sarum to be represented when the town of Birmingham was unrepresented, when old Sarum with two members had not a citizen within her borough, and when Birmingham contained forty thousand free, white, adult males. It was this that called for the refrom bill. The principle of the repre

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