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By Authority :
SYDNEY : CHARLES POTTER, GOVERNMENT PRINTER.

1896.
(18. for a single Number, or 108. per Annam.]

116 128-95-6 (a)

CONTENTS.

PAGE

193

l'SEFUL AUSTRALIAN PLANTS ... ... ... ...J. H. Maiden

The Spotted Gum (Eucalyptus maculata, Hook f.)
Hooker's Fescue Grass (Schedonorus Hookeriana, Benth.)

196

SPOTTED Gra ...

... (J. H. Maiden Report on, particularly with reference to its G. R. Cowdery value for Wood-paring.

(J. V. de Coque

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THE RADIATOR ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Report of Experiments at the Practical Dairy School at Poligny

(France).

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GENERAL NOTES ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Planters' Friend or Imphee-death of cattle after eating young

shoots; Seed Wheat from Wagga ; Butter ; Ramie Fibre;
Table showing Districts in which certain Timbers are
available, also names of Saw-mill Proprietors.

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NOTICE OF COPYRIGHT.

It is hereby notified that all matter contained in the Agricultural Gazette of New South Wales is protected by copyright. Newspapers desirous of republishing any articles may do so, and are merely required to make the usual acknowledgment.

4th June, 1894.

Useful Australian Plants.

By J. H. MAIDEN,
Consulting Botanist.

No. 23.—THE SPOTTED GUM (Eucalyptus maculata,

Hook, f.). As the report of the Committee appointed by the Minister to inquire into the merits of Spotted Gum is to be found on another page, a brief account of the tree may be of interest at the present time.

Other Vernacular Names. Sometimes called “Mottled Gum" in the old

days.

Aboriginal Names.—“Booangie" of the aborigines of the counties of Cumberland and Camden; “Yah-ruigne" of those of the Illawarra. Mr. Forester Allan quotes the aboriginal name about Ulladulla as "Thurraney.".

Botanical Name.Eucalyptus, already explained; maculata, Latin for "spotted," in allusion to the appearance of the bark.

Leaves.-A variety (citriodora) of this species is the Citron-scented Gum of Queensland, a tree which is hardy in the warmer coast districts of this Colony. The odour of its leares is well known. It is interesting to note that the leaves of the ordinary spotted gum tree, when young and tender emit, when crushed in the warm hand, a faint odour of a character similar to that of the Citron-scented Gum-additional evidence of the relationship of the trees.

Some years ago the late Mr. K. T. Staiger, of Brisbane, examined Spotted Gum oil, and reported, "a neutral oil of specific gravity, 0.891.” Subsequently Messrs. Schimmel & Co., of Leipzig, examined the oil, with the following results :-“ Specific gravity at 15° Č., 0:900; boils between 210° and 220°; contains citronellon and geraniol (?).” It is not, however, likely that the distillation of the oil of the Spotted Gum will ever be commercially successful.

Ezudation.-Spotted gum exudes kino comparatively abundantly. Usually it is of an olive-brown to a reddish-brown colour. A full account of it will be found in a paper published by the present writer in the Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales for 1891, page 418, to which the student is referred. I may add that the kino is being re-examined by Mr. H. G. Smith and myself, and our results will be ready for publication shortly.

Bark.—The bark is smooth, yet blotched with irregular patches of a paler colour to the rest of the bark. The bark is undergoing a continuous process of " ripening” in patches (blotches). The outer layer of a patch of bark

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