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0, fear'not the bugle, though loudly it blows,
It calls but the warders that guard thy repose;
Their bows would be bended, their blades would be red,
Ere the step of a foeman draws near to thy bed.

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0, hush thee, my babie, the time soon will come,
When thy sleep shall be broken by trumpet and drum;
Then hush thee, my darling, take rest while you may,
For strife comes with manhood, and waking with day.

HELPS TO STUDY

Notes and Questions Who do you think sang this lul. | How would the warders protect laby to the baby?

the baby? What words in the first line tell | For what were the bows used ?

you that the baby's father is What word could be used instead dead?

of “blades’? What things mentioned in the What will this baby have to do

first stanza show that the baby when he becomes a man? has great possessions

What will the trumpet and drum Whom did the bugle call when it mean to him then? blew “loudly''?

How can you tell that this baby Why was this necessary?

lived a long time ago?

Words and Phrases for Study PRONUNCIATION: tow'-ers bū’-gle

guärd

fõe'-man

VOCABULARY:

rē-põse'-sleep; rest; quiet.
strife-struggle; war; contention.

TVORDS AND PHRASES: "sire"

"knight' "foeman's

"strife"

"guard thy repose" "warders”

SEAL LULLABY

RUDYARD KIPLING Rudyard Kipling (1865- ) is an English writer. He was born at Bombay, India. He received his education in England, returned to India as a newspaper editor, and later lived several years in the United States. He has written many stories and poems for children.

Oh! Hush thee, my baby, the night is behind us,

And black are the waters that sparkled so green.
The moon, o'er the combers, looks downward to find us

At rest in the hollows that rustle between.

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Where billow meets billow, there soft be thy pillow;

Ah, weary, wee flipperling, curl at thy ease !
The storm shall not wake thee, nor shark overtake thee,

Asleep in the arms of the slow-swinging seas.

HELPS TO STUDY

Words and Phrases for Study PRONUNCIATION: wa'-ters

hõl’-lows comb'-ers (kõm’ērs) rús’-tle (růs'-'1)

flïp'-per-ling wēa’-rý

VOCABULARY:

spär'-kled-glistened.

bil'-low-a large wave.

WORDS AND PHRASES:

“the hollows that rustle between”.
"weary, wee flipperling"
"nor shark overtake thee''

"combers”
"slow-swinging seas”
"curl at thy ease'

PART II

STORIES OF ADVENTURE

There's the parrot! Green body and yellovo tail; there he is ! Poor Robin Crusoe, he called him, when he came home again after sailing round the island. Poor Robin Crusoe, where have you been, Robin Crusoe!... There goes Friday, running for his life to the little creek !

Hush! Again a forest and some body up in a tree-not Robin Hood, . . . but an Eastern King with a glittering scimitar and turban. . . . It is the setting-in of the bright Arabian Nights.

"Oh, now all common things become uncommon and enchanted to me. All lamps are wonderful; all rings are talismans. . . . Trees are for Ali Baba to hide in; beefsteaks are to throw down into the Valley of Diamonds that the precious stones may stick to them and be carried by the eagles to. their nests, whence the traders, with loud cries, will scare them.

CHARLES DICKENS.

In sooth it was a goodly time,
For it was in the golden prime
of good Haroun Alraschid.

ALFRED LORD TENNYSON.

PART II

STORIES OF ADVENTURE

THE ARABIAN NIGHTS, ROBIN HOOD, GULLIVER’S

TRAVELS, AND ROBINSON CRUSOE

INTRODUCTION

In days of old, before there were books and newspapers, there were certain men who delighted in telling wonderful tales of heroes and their adventures. These heroes always outwitted all other men of their time by their cleverness, and excelled in deeds of courage and might. The story-teller told the tales that he himself had heard from the lips of older story-tellers. As he told these tales, the close attention of his hearers and his desire to give even greater pleasure, spurred him on and led him to add here and there a new adventure. In this way a story which may have had but a small beginning, grew in wonder with each generation. Later, perhaps, some one of greater ability wove the shorter legends that had floated down the ages into one long tale.

For hundreds of years the stories which we know as the “Arabian Nights” were told in the tents of the desert or among the dwellers along the Tigris and the Nile or in the gay bazaars of the cities of the East. They were first collected and written down about the time America was discovered. The one who did this—we do not know his name nor where he lived—tells us that there was once a cruel king of India, who determined to rid his land of all women. He had married his vizier's beautiful daughter, who determined with the help of her sister to tell the

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