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Jennings, Captain, 16
Jennings, Mrs., 16
"Joseph and his Brethren," by

Wells, 23

K.

Kean as Richard Luke of York,

critique by Keats, 93, 115
Kean, Edmund, 112
Keats, Fanny, sister of the poet,

13, 29, 38, 43, 45, 57, 62, 120,

121, 129, 148
Keats, Frances, mother of the

poet, 12 ; her death, 16 ; 25, 126
Keats, George, brother of the

poet, 13, 15, 18, 19, 25, 27, 30,
32, 37, 38, 64, 71, 95, 98 ; his
view as to John Keats's sensitive-
ness to criticism, 103 ; III, 119,
120, 126, 136, 141, 142, 145, 146,

147, 150, 151, 155, 159, 160
Keats, George, Epistle to, by John

Keats, 67, 68
Keats, John, his parentage, 12 ;

his birth in London, October
31, 1795, 13; anecdote of his
childhood, 13; goes to the
school of Mr. Clarke at Enfield,
14; his studies, pugnacity, &c.,
15; death of his parents, 16;
apprenticed to a surgeon, Ham-
mond, 18; leaves Hammond,
and walks the hospitals, 18, 19;
reads Spenser's “Faery Queen,"
and drops surgical study, 20;
makes acquaintance with Leigh
Hunt, Haydon, and others, 20,
21, 22; his first volume, Poems,
1817, 22; writes Endymion,"
23 ; his health suffers in Oxford,
24; anecdotes (Coleridge, &c.),

25 ; makes a pedestrian tour in
Scotland &c. with Charles
Armitage Brown, 25-29; takes
leave of his brother George and
his wife, 27 ; his brother Tom
dies, 29 ; lodges with Brown at
Hampstead, 29; meets Miss
Cox (“Charmian") and Miss
Brawne, and falls in love with
the latter, 30–35; their engage-
ment, 36; his friendship towards
Haydon cools, 36, 37 ; at Shank-
lin and Winchester, 37, 38; sees
his brother George again, and
is left by him in pecuniary
straits, 38, 39; the painful cir-
cuinstances of his closing
·months, owing to illness, his
love affair, and the depreciation
of his poems, 40, 41; beginning
of his consumptive illness, 41,
42; removes to Kentish Town,
43, 44; returns to Mrs. Brawne's
house at Hampstead, 45; his
love-letters, 45-54 ; travels to
Italy with Joseph Severn, 54-
59 ; Severn's account of his last
days in Rome, 60, 61 ; his death
there, February 23, 1821, 62,
63 ; his early turn for mere
rhyming, 64; his early writings,
and first volume, 65, 69; dia-
tribe against Boileau, and poets
of that school, 70; the pub-
lishers relinquish sale of the
volume, 72 ; “ Endymion," and
passage from an early poem
forecasting this attempt, 73-76 ;
details as to composition of
"Endymion," 76-79; prefaces
to the poem, 79-83; adverse
155-157 ; negative turn in re-
ligious matters, 157–160 ; wine
and diet, 160, 161; conclusion
as to his character, 161, 162 ;
his early tone in poetry, 164 ;
critical estimate of his first
volume, Poems, 1817, 165-166 ;
of “Endymion," 167, 168 ;
narrative of this poem, 168–175;
defects and beauties of “Endy-
mion," 176-180; critical esti-
mate of “ Isabella," 180; “Eve
of St. Agnes," 182 ; “Eve of
St. Mark," 184; “Hyperion,"
185 ; “Otho the Great," 189;
“ Lamia," 190 ;

critique in The Quarterly Re-
view, 83-91 ; question debated
whether this and other attacks
affected Keats deeply, 91-97 ;
statements by Shelley, 97; and
by Haydon, 99; other evidence,
102 ; conclusion as to this point,
105 ; Keats writes “ Isabella,"
“The Eve of St. Agnes," and
“Hyperion," 107 ; “ Lamia,"
108; and publishes the volume
containing these poems, 1820,
108 ; other poems in the volume,
109; posthumous poems of
Keats, “The Eve of St. Mark,"
“Otho the Great," “ The Cap
and Bells," &c., 110–115; his
letters and other prose writings,
115-117 ; Keats's burial-place,
118-119 ; projects for writing
his life, accomplished finally by
Lord Houghton, 119; his rela-
tions with Hunt, Shelley, and
others, 121-123 ; Keats's small
stature and personal appear-
ance, 124-126 ; the portraits of
him, 126-129; difficulty of clearly
estimating his character, 129;
his poetic ambition and intensity
of thought, 130, 131 ; his moral
tone, 132; his character (“no
decision &c.,) estimated by
Haydon, 133 - 139 ; Lord
Houghton's account of his
manner in society, 139 ; his
suspiciousness, 141 ; and dislike
of mankind, 142; his feeling to-
wards women, 143-146 ; and
towards Miss Brawne, 147, 148 ;
his babits, opinions, likings, &c.,
148–155; humour and jocularity,

“ Belle Dame
sans Merci” (quoted), 192; the
five chief Odes, 194 ; analysis of
the “Ode to a Nightingale,"
200 ; various posthumous lyrics,
sonnets, &c., 202 ; Keats's feel-
ing towards women, as developed
in his poems, 205; "swooning,"
206; sensuousness and senti-
ment, 207 ; comparison between
Keats and Shelley, and final

remarks, 208
Keats, Mrs. George, 27, 32, 95,

I20

Keats, Thomas, father of the poet,

12; his death, 16; 126
Keats, Thomas, brother of the

poet, 13, 15, 19, 23, 24, 25, 28;
his death, 29; 37, 38, 39, 121,

135, 159, 160
"King Stephen,” by Keats, 73,

112, 190
Kotzebue, 150

L.

Lamb, Charles, 78, 150

Newton, Sir Isaac, 151
Nightingale, Ode to a," by
Keats, 103, 109, 160, 192, 194–

202; analysed, 200-202 ; 204
“Nile,"Sonnets on the, by Keats,

&c. ; 110

Lamb, Dr., 44
“ Lamia," by Keats, 108, 138,

151, 160 ; critical estimate of the

poem, 190, &c.; 206
“Lamia, and other Poems," by

Keats (1820), 44, 97, 103, 108,

109, 110, 205
Lawrence, Sir Thomas, 61
Lemprière's Classical Diction-

ary," 15
Lindon, Mrs. (see Brawne, Fanny)
Llanos, 121
Lockhart, 91
Lucas, 19
Lucy Vaughan Lloyd (pseudonym

of Keats), 114
Lyrics (various) by Keats, 204

M.
Mackereth, George Wilson, 19

· Maia, Ode to," by Keats, 202
“Mark, Eve of St.," by Keats,

52, 110, 182 ; critical estimate

of the poem, 184-185; 190
Marmontel's " Incas of Peru," 15
Mathew, George Felton, Epistle

to, by Keats, 67 ; 157
Medwin's “Life of Shelley,” 34
“Melancholy, Ode on,” by Keats,

109, 192, 194-199
Milton, 107, 135, 147, 159, 165,

186, 188
· Miserrimus," by Reynolds, 23
Mitford, Miss, 101, 135
Moore, Thomas, 165
Morning Chronicle, The, 93
Murray, John, 102

0.
Ollier, Charles, 21, 71
"Otho the Great," by Keats, 38,

III, 112; critical estimate of,
189

P.
“ Paradise Lost," 108, 175, 187
“Paradise Lost," Notes on, by

Keats, 115
Philostratus's “Life of Apollo-

nius," 108
“Poems" (1817), by Keats, 23,

66; letter regarding this volume,
by the publishers, 72; 122, 164-

167
Pope, 70
Procter, Mrs., 125, 126
Purcell, 148
“Psyche, Ode to," by Keats, 109,
192, 194-199

Q.
Quarterly Review, The, 83 ; its

critique of “Endymion'
tracted, 83-91 ; 93, 95, 96, 97,
98, 99, 102, 104, 153, 179
"Quixote, Don,” 120

ex-

N.
Napoleon I., 32
“ Narensky," opera by C. A.

Brown, 27

R.
R. B., 93
Raphael, 155
Rawlings, William, 16
Reynolds, John Hamilton, 22, 79,

95, 107, 115, 128, 156
Reynolds, Misses, 30, 31, 142, 145,

148

Spenser, Edmund, 66, 164, 165
Spenser's Cave of Despair, picture

by Severn, 55
Spenser's “ Faery Queen," 20, 149
“Spenser, Imitation of," by Keats,

64
Stephens, Henry, 19, 78, 132, 147
“Stories after Nature," by Wells,

23
Swinburne, Mr. (on “Hyperion"),

186 ; 189, 199

T.
Tasso, 165
Taylor and Hessey, 23, 72, 76, 78,

83, 93, 96, 109, 120, 128, 140,

146, 149, 152
Terry, 100
Thomson, James, 70
Titian's “ Bacchus and Ariadne,"

179
Tooke's “ Pantheon,” 15
Torlonia, 61

V.
Virgil, 165
Virgil's Æneid, 15, 20
Voltaire, 158

W.

Reynolds, Mrs., 31
Rice, James, 38, 41, 147
Richardson, Dr., 25
Ritchie, 78
Robinson Crusoe, 15
Robinson, H. Crabb, 104
Rossetti, Dante G., 52, 184, 185,
190

S.
Sandt, 150
Scott, Sir Walter, 91, 100
Severn, Joseph, 39; leaves Eng-

land with Keats for Italy, 54 ;
59 ; his narrative of Keats's last
days, 60, &c. ; 104, 118, 119,
125 ; his portraits of Keats, 127-

129; 139, 143, 147, 148
Shakespeare (Macbeth), 15;(Ham-

let), 52; 93, 114, 135, 747 ;

(King Lear), 151 ; 155, 165
Shakespeare, Notes on, by Keats,

115
Shakespeare's sonnets, Book on,

by C. A. Brown, 27
Sharpey, Dr., 30
Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 39, 58, 59,

71, 77, 82, 91, 96; his references
to “Endymion," and The Quar-
terly Review, 97-99; 102, 110,
119, 123, 125, 141, 147, 167, 179,
180, 185; comparison between

Shelley and Keats, 208
“Sleep and Poetry,” by Keats, 67,

69 ; extract from, 70 ; 165
Smith, Horace, 68
Snook, 56
Sonnet by Keats (“Bright Star,"

Webb, Cornelius, 92
Webster, 189
Wells, Charles, 23
Wilson, John, 91
“Woman, when I behold thee"

&c., poem by Keats, quoted, 143
Wood, Warrington, 119
Woodhouse, Richard, 94, 149, 153,

188
Wordsworth, 21, 78; (“The Ex-

cursion,")152; 153, 156, 164, 179

&c.), 114

Sonnets (various) by Keats, 164,

167, 203, &c.
Spence's “Polymetis," 15

Z.
2 (probably Lockhart), 91, 92, 100.

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