Imágenes de páginas
PDF
[graphic]

ut But yet, om soul's repose, et with one whose

act, and pride, are to mihilate my country

and individually! Ingene; but duty shal

above passion that he

alone to his own place drever see him again. He

desert his country for sal were be capable of ding

le would cease to be capabile i

sing my admiration and love. * Here is

a n d Quitutism?

laste of the beas, and
like the agis fuble, los
You se mai pot

When the lover of Margaret receiv. romances, which, to ed the message of the queen of the to enervate her mind gipsies, he repaired to the spot where this, she felt what is his mistress lay to all appearance in of the most irrechi the arms of death. But life had not she had all that es departed, and even as he hung gazing and self-devotion over her, a faint colour mounted to our enlightened das her cheek, and her bosom began to a heap with knigh heave beneath her white garment. gic. Let me not He raised her in his arms, bore her to apologist of the the air, and she revived. When her which, is, I am senses were fully resorted, she consent- and injurious ; ed to guard against another separation guish from that by marrying her lover and saviour. susceptible feeli William had provided a humble post- condemned by chaise to convey his bride far from mindedness of the scene of her past perils and tempt. judicial to pol ations. They journeyed by slow spirit, and the stages to the north, and at the close if our feeling of a few days entered a romantic vil. to be drilled lage. The lover bridegroom pointed ments for the out a grey and noble old pile, the tur- or as if we rets of which rose lofty above the our path thr waving trees of an ancient park. He to traffic it asked if she should like to visit it. turn to Eph She replied in the affirmative, and nity unsati they drove unchallenged through the knew, she gateway and along a noble avenue, idol of im shaded by huge oaks. When they contented reached the portals of the building, even tryi the post-boy stopped the horses, dis- the conc mounted, threw open the door of the such acti chaise and let down the steps. William Eugene lifted his companion from her seat her visio in his arms.

" The v
“ Margaret,” said he, “ look up.
This is Woodley castle, and you are the very
Lady Armitage!”

fancy
Buth
conside

over ti
THE ENTHUSIAST.

and u

operat A TALE OF THE POLISH WAR.

had s

had b (Concluded from page 278.)

over

restor The natural result of this inter- treach course was a deep interest on both him i sides, which soon amounted to affec- ened tion. Ephene, indeed, was not aware rowsof this. As to love, her ideas of it each were of a singular kind. She had a Sh

Sh seen scarcely a person, except the domestics in the castle ; and of course

AI her notions of the species were formed by analogy with those she knew; consequently precluding the indulgence But of any prepossession. She had read cam

be ex- they're not willing to let the men out • domes of the garrison ; and, besides, how are right, of we to get out of the castle to ask for old sol. them ? and moreover, who can be

clowns. spared on such an errand ? I trow 's there there's quite few enough on the bat'here was tlements as it is." reat dis. “Oh, do not trouble yourself about latter to that,” said Ephene: “I will undertake probable to find a messenger." ght. In “Ay, my dear young lady, you nost dis- will find any of us, I hope, ready to ad con- go for you ; but I mean, what is the w came castle to do in the mean time? I'll nce exe- set off myself, my lady, if you like; »st infa- for it's a journey I should hardly for plun- choose anybody less seasoned than I offending am to undertake. It is a matter of ncreased two leagues over the snow, and through

alth, to the rascally foragers, which is worse; ty would for my head and body will soon part ugh she company, if they get a peep of me; ight not and I must of necessity start in the Hygeian night, to give them the slip, if possible. gh dud. So I'll prepare to be off to-night." f for his "No," replied the gouvernante, “ I 1 child. will find some one of less consequence le said; in the defence, to which you and the that we other men must give all your exergirl and tions." pack of Ephene then wrote an energetic hard !" address to the commander of the gar

to rise rison, describing her situation and depress- imploring assistance ; she next sought imation a bearer in her brother Stanislaus, ed, and whom she selected as being a diminuclaimed, tive person, not readily descried, and is agita- agile in eluding observation, wellme; my acquainted with the route, and easily

for my spared from the castle. But he met that be the proposal with trembling and tears, we will protesting his terror was such that he vill hold could not undertake so hazardous an hearten embassy. This want of heroism ow actu- roused his sister's indignation, and manage- she reproached his effeminacy. He she di- scarcely heard her reproaches ; his cretion; sense of them was lost in horror lest so great she should send out any one with the

scheme letter such a night as was then drawhe fort. ing on. “Never mind about others," he most said Ephene, scornfully; "I do not reold man, quire you to go out in the snow. Go outler in and sleep, effeminate child, and rest est years safely-until, indeed, the invading de

He as. spot fires the roof over your head ; ner plan, then you will, no doubt, think your lether it life worth running for." : ye see Leaving him to his cogitations, she

should have been, had it been possible whether I exist or not. But yet, for any power to restore your father were it but for my own soul's repose, to me. He has friends in Russia, I would not league it with one whose perhaps parents, perhaps brothers and profession, and object, and pride, are to sisters; and the thought of how much persecute and annihilate my country. good you may have done ought to No ;-personally and individually I make you glad. Perhaps he has a must worship Eugene ; but duty shall wife, who"

so far prevail above passion that he Here Ephene's tears fell in such shall return alone to his own place, torrents, accompanied by sobs which and I will never see him again. He seemed to burst from her heart, that will not desert his country for my madame stopped short, and gazed at sake ; and were be capable of doing her in astonishment, saying, “ What that, he would cease to be capable of can be the meaning of this, Ephene? possessing my admiration and love." Are you sorry this Russian is cured ? “ Here is a fine run of Quixotism !". or sorry he is going away ?-or can it cried madame. "Now pray, Ephene, be possible that you really love him?" leave off these dreams, and do not,

Ephene, throwing herself at her like the dog in the fable, drop the mother's feet, could only exclaim, meat in catching at the reflection. “ Forgive 'me! dearest mother, do You see how much good those Poles not be angry-forgive me!"

who think as you do have obtained : “ Forgive you, child! what is there come, give over these fantasies, and to forgive? There is nobody whose act like a person of reason and busiforgiveness you need ask, if you can ness." forgive yourself for throwing away “Dear mother-do not tempt me; your affection where you know it will my mind is made up." meet only contempt. If I had had “ Well, then, I must leave you to the most remote idea you would fling the enjoyment of it; I cannot preyourself into this net, the Russian tend to interfere with a young person should have died ten deaths before I whose thoughts are flying in some rewould have employed you to take care gion that ordinary people could not of him :-not but I should be very glad find, and who sticks to her opinions as if he did like you, and would marry if they were the fruit of eighty years' you ; but of course that is not the experience.”

Eugene returned to Russia, and “ Yes, dear mother, he says-he Ephene, wounded by her mother's says he loves me."

continued raillery, shut herself up in “ Indeed! But he would not mar- solitude as much as possible. Months ry you, I suppose ; and that's worse passed without any momentous ocstill."

currence, till the Russians renewed " Yes, dear mother, he would; he the campaign which invaded and dewishes it."

solated Poland. Ephene had visibly “ Why, then, in the name of for- declined in health; her large liquid tune do you cry and pine as if you eyes were sunk and dim, her slender must leave him for ever? Did you figure was sharpened, and her comthink I would not give you my cone plexion entirely colourless. Masent? You could not tell that till dame's sarcasm was consequently susyou had asked for it."

pended, and she treated her child "No, dear mother, I thought you with extreme' gentleness and tendermight perhaps not refuse. But ness : she was both grieved and mor

- But what? What other draw. tified, for she loved Ephene, and took back could there possibly be ?" pleasure in her beauty, which now,

“Oh, mother, think of our coun- though deeply interesting, was paintry of what it has suffered, and is fully so, and fast decaying. still suffering ! I am very insignificant,. The castle of I_ was besieged ; and perhaps I nourish an absurd no- for, dilapidated as it was, it was still tion of my own importance in sup- worth gaining, provided that could be posing that it can be of the least con- accomplished without much sacrifice, sequence to Poland what I do, or and from such a garrison as it con

[ocr errors]

tained little resistance was to be ex- they're not willing to let the men out pected. The whole muster of domes- of the garrison ; and, besides, how are tics did not exceed seven or eight, of we to get out of the castle to ask for whom one half were infirm old sol. them ? and moreover, who can be diers, and the other country clowns. spared on such an errand ? I trow Of ammunition and provisions there there's quite few enough on the batwere plenty, it is true, and there was tlements as it is." a well-garrisoned fort at no great dis. “ Oh, do not trouble yourself about tance; but it was no easy matter to that,” said Ephene: “I will undertake send to it for men, nor very probable to find a messenger." they would be obtained if sought. In “Ay, my dear young lady, you this dilemma madame was almost dis- will find any of us, I hope, ready to tracted: the oppression she had con- go for you ; but I mean, what is the demned others for resisting now came castle to do in the mean time? I'll home to herself, and she at once exe- set off myself, my lady, if you like ; crated the Russians as the most infa- for it's a journey I should hardly mous wretches in existence, for plun- choose anybody less seasoned than I dering and destroying an unoffending am to undertake. It is a matter of family. Her agitation was increased two leagues over the snow, and through by the state of Ephene's health, to the rascally foragers, which is worse; which she feared this calamity would for my head and body will soon part give a finishing stroke, though she company, if they get a peep of me; was told that excitement might not and I must of necessity start in the be injurious by her new Hygeian night, to give them the slip, if possible. oracle. (For she had, in high dud. So I'll prepare to be off to-night." geon, discarded Doctor Kropoff for his “ No," replied the gouvernante, “I inability.) She cried like a child. will find some one of less consequence " Oh what shall I do?" she said; in the defence, to which you and the • what am I to do? to think that we other men must give all your exermust turn out, my poor sick girl and tions." all, and give up our home to a pack of Ephene then wrote an energetic plundering ruffians it is very hard !" address to the commander of the garBut Ephene's spirit seemed to rise rison, describing her situation and instead of being additionally depress- imploring assistance ; she next sought ed; she roused herself to animation a bearer in her brother Stanislaus, and activity; her eye lightened, and whom she selected as being a diminuher cheek flushed, as she exclaimed, tive person, not readily descried, and • Dearest mother, repress this agita- agile in eluding observation, welltion; we will not leave our home; my acquainted with the route, and easily father's castle shall be kept for my spared from the castle. But he met father's countrymen, and if that be the proposal with trembling and tears, impossible, it shall fall, and we will protesting his terror was such that he perish in its ruins—but we will hold could not undertake so hazardous an out awhile, only do not be dishearten embassy. This want of heroism ed." This young creature now actu roused his sister's indignation, and ally took upon herself the manage she reproached his effeminacy. He ment of the defence, which she di scarcely heard her reproaches ; his rected with extraordinary discretion; sense of them was lost in horror lest but the deficiency of men was so great she should send out any one with the a drawback, that she began to scheme letter such a night as was then drawhow to procure some from the fort. ing on. “Never mind about others," She consulted on this point the most said Ephene, scornfully; “I do not reintelligent of her troopman old man, quire you to go out in the snow. Go who performed the office of butler in and sleep, effeminate child, and rest the family, and who all his best years safely-until, indeed, the invading dehad served under her father. He as. spot fires the roof over your head; sured her of the excellence of her plan, then you will, no doubt, think your but confessed his doubt whether it life worth running for." could be compassed. “ For ye see Leaving him to his cogitations, she revolved in her mind who else could degree similar to that which I cherish be dispensed with to bear her mes for him. Oh! Eugene, Eugene, I sage. But there was none without would, for your sake, I had been the his post, and that a critical and im. fairest and noblest in Russia.'' But portant ove; so that she came to the she instantly reproached herself for determination of devoting herself to this deviation from the idolatry to her the task, without the knowledge of country which she was resolved should anybody. Accordingly she pretended overcome that towards her alien lover ; to postpone the despatch for that and it was an entirely involuntary, night, and, making such additional perhaps unconscious movement by arrangements for present security as which she drew out of her bosom a she could, she said that, feeling indis- lock of his hair, and kissed it many posed she would rest until the morn- times. ing, and desired she might not be dis. An hour or two before midnight turbed. Madame was heartily satis- she stole out at a low postern, and fied with her intention, and congra- hastened resolutely, though cautiously, tulated her upon taking some heed to forward. She had proceeded no great her health at last, observing that it distance, when she heard the voices of was of much more consequence than a party of Russians, whereupon she the defence of the castle, and she ran a long way aside, trembling lest wished they had only some kind of her steps in the snow should betray dwelling to retire to, and then the her, and laid herself down behind a Russians should be welcome to the hillock until they should have passed. castle.

The darkness, however, prevented their Ephene, well pleased at her success observing the tracks, and she again in deception, retired, as to her room. set forward unmolested. After many Poor madame's repose would have similar risks, she arrived at her desbeen rather more broken than it was, tination, where, with much difficulty, had she known the kind of repose in she obtained an interview with the which her daughter passed the night. commander. She had not premediThe summer was over, and the nights tated what she would say, but fluency were bitterly cold ; moreover, Ephene and energy directed her speech, which had much reason to fear she would so acted upon the officer that he prolose the way in the dark, as she had mised twenty-five men should be inbeen but very seldom to the place stantly sent up to the castle. He where the fortress was situated. But desired her to remain where she was this did not deter her; she was so en- for the present, representing that she thusiastic in her cause that her per- would be more secure; but she would sonal safety was wholly absent from not for a moment listen to the propoher mind. The only thought she gave sal. So she set off again, accompato herself was so far as she was con- nied by her escort, and some time benected with Eugene ; to whom, indeed, fore day-break returned from her sucat intervals, her heart turned with a cessful embassy. How madame and sickening feeling of disappointment. Stanislaus stared, and how the men “ He never loved me, or he might on the battlements shouted, may be have spared me this," was her reverie. conceived. The final defeat of the “ Surely, surely, with his influence, besiegers now appeared probable, and he might have obtained the exemption Ephene shared her post with the offiof our castle. Would I not have cer who commanded the auxiliaries. given my life to save the smallest Among the topics of conversation, thing to him ? and when a word only when indeed an interval occurred from him would have preserved to my which permitted that indulgence, poor mother what he knew was her Russia and the Russians of course stood only home, might he not have afforded foremost. It was therefore without it?' No—there is no reason that he much difficulty that Ephene found should. I am not an object of inter- an opportunity of carelessly enquiring est to him, and I am deservedly pu- after the young General Iriarte. The nished for presuming to fancy he officer expressed no small degree of could regard me with a feeling in any surprise at her being ignorant that he

« AnteriorContinuar »