Narconomics: How to Run a Drug Cartel

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PublicAffairs, 2016 M02 23 - 288 páginas
This is a unique look into the huge and fascinating multi-billion dollar international drug industry. Rather than reporting it as a war,” Wainwight looked at the drug trade as a business, with a quarter billion customers and worldwide revenues of about $300 billion a yearwith similar concerns as any Fortune 500 business, such as human resources, outsourcing and corporate social responsibility.

Some of Wainwight's insights to help turn the way we think about the war on drugs on its head include:

Supply and demand. Drug cartels, as monopoly-buyers, use tactics like forcing their suppliers, the farmers, to absorb price shocks when coca fields are eradicated, rather than absorb it themselves.

Research and development. The cartels have invested in innovative ways to increase yield from coca plants; so even though less coca is now grown, it yields more cocaine, thus keeping the supply chain in good shape.

Mergers and acquisitions. Why the violence and bloody battles of the Mexican cartels have been generated by opportunistic takeover attempts.

Competition and collusion. Why the mafias running El Salvador's drug gangs realized that violent competition was hurting profits and opted for a strategy of collusion.

Social responsibility. How cartels give back” to society by meeting social needs that governments have been unable to satisfy.

Media relations. How dedicated press officers” communicate with (and threaten) local journalists to secure the kind of coverage the cartel wants and use the media to send intimidating messages to their rivals

Human resource models. How cartels, in a business with a high turnover of personnel because of all the killing use prisons as employment agencies and training academies to ensure a steady stream of new recruits for jobs that are risky and don't pay particularly well.

Franchising. Lessons the cartels have learned from some of Fortune 500's restaurant business'.

Using classical economics and modern business theory to explain why drug cartels work in the way they do and based seven years of reporting in more than a dozen countries, Wainwright provides fascinating, humorous and novel insights into a multibillion-dollar worldwide industry and provides an innovative blueprint to address the drug problem, as well as a range of other criminal activities. If mobsters think like businessmen, law enforcers can thwart them by learning to think like economists.
 

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LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - BenKline - LibraryThing

I was given this book in exchange for a review as part of Goodread's FirstReads program. First off - let me say this is a very interesting conversation starter book - just from reading the name of it ... Leer comentario completo

NARCONOMICS: How to Run a Drug Cartel

Crítica de los usuarios  - Kirkus

In his first book, seasoned journalist Wainwright asks a radical question: what if we stopped looking at drug cartels as armies of faceless gangsters and instead analyzed them as innovative global ... Leer comentario completo

Contenido

CARTEL INCORPORATED
1
COCAINES SUPPLY CHAIN
9
COMPETITION VS COLLUSION
29
THE PEOPLE PROBLEMS OF A DRUG CARTEL
53
PR AND THE MADMEN OF SINALOA
77
OFFSHORING
103
Photo Section
125
THE PROMISE AND PERILS OF FRANCHISING
133
ORDERING A LINE ONLINE
167
DIVERSIFYING INTO NEW MARKETS
193
COMING FULL CIRCLE
215
WHY ECONOMISTS MAKE THE BEST POLICE OFFICERS
239
Acknowledgments
255
Notes
257
Index
267
Derechos de autor

INNOVATING AHEADOF THE LAW
149

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Acerca del autor (2016)

Tom Wainwright is the Britain editor of The Economist. Until 2013 he was the Mexico City bureau chief of The Economist, covering Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean, as well as parts of South America and the United States border region. He has been a commentator on the drugs business on CNN, the BBC and NPR, among others. He has a first-class degree in philosophy, politics, and economics from Oxford University. Wainwright lives in London, England.

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