The Evolution of Educational Theory in the United States

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 1999 - 249 páginas


There is no better way to understand a society's assessment of its own success or failure than an examination of its theories of education, because any attempt to improve national performance will be reflected in educational policy. This study is a comprehensive account of the evolution of American educational theory from the colonial period to the present. It includes a broad discussion of the foundations upon which early Americans built their educational policy, as well as influential factors unique to the American experience. From the Revolution to nineteenth century reform efforts to the turbulent twentieth century, educational theory has been adapted to suit the needs of an ever-changing, multicultural society.

Throughout U.S. history key objectives have affected the character of education, particularly curriculum. One main thrust for reform has been the belief that equality in education serves the national interest. Examination of the historical attitudes toward the education of African Americans provides a valuable insight into this process. Today America is experiencing significant difficulties in making its educational system succeed, and the negative social effects of this deterioration are already apparent. The future success of educational theory lies in international cooperative efforts.

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Contenido

Introduction
1
1 The Origins of the Theory of Western Education
15
2 Theory During the Colonial Period
37
3 Theory During the Revolutionary Period
61
4 Theory During the Common School Movement
83
5 The Theory of Secondary Higher and Teacher Education
103
6 The Courts and the Theory of Education for African Americans
125
From Warren G Harding to Bill Clinton
153
Summary Conclusion and Implications
185
Selected Bibliography
215
Index
237
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Página 163 - In the future days, which we seek to make secure, we look forward to a world founded upon four essential human freedoms. The first is freedom of speech and expression— everywhere in the world. The second is freedom of every person to worship God in his own way — everywhere in the world.
Página 210 - If an unfriendly foreign power had attempted to impose on America the mediocre educational performance that exists today, we might well have viewed it as an act of war.
Página 139 - States shall be entitled to the full and equal enjoyment of the accommodations, advantages, facilities, and privileges of inns, public conveyances on land or water, theaters, and other places of public amusement; subject only to the conditions and limitations established by law, and applicable alike to citizens of every race and color, regardless of any previous condition of servitude.
Página 205 - No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.
Página 164 - Second, they desire to see no territorial changes that do not accord with the freely expressed wishes of the peoples concerned ; Third, they respect the right of all peoples to choose the form of government under which they will live; and they wish to see sovereign rights and self-government restored to those who have been forcibly deprived of them...
Página 80 - Nor am I less persuaded, that you will agree with me in opinion, that there is nothing which can better deserve your patronage than the promotion of science and literature. Knowledge is in every country the surest basis of public happiness. In one, in which the measures of government receive their impression so immediately from the sense of the community, as in ours, it is proportionably essential.
Página 139 - That all persons within the jurisdiction of the United States shall be entitled to the full and equal enjoyment of the accommodations, advantages, facilities, and privileges of inns, public conveyances on land or water...

Acerca del autor (1999)

DICKSON A. MUNGAZI is Regent's Professor of History at the Center for Excellence in Education at Northern Arizona University. He is the author of numerous books on African political history and education, including The Mind of Black Africa (Praeger, 1996), Educational Reform and the Transformation of Southern Africa (Praeger, 1997), and The Last Defenders of the Laager: Ian D. Smith and F.W. de Klerk (Praeger, 1997).

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