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SUGGESTIONS FOR REDUCING DUTIES—SCHEDULE M, PAPER, ETC.
Paragraphs 407, 408, 409, 410, 411, 413, 415, 418, 420.

New YORK, January 6, 1913.
Hon. Oscar W. UNDERWOOD,
Chairman Committee on Ways and Means,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. SIR: We the undersigned merchants, interested as importers and dealers in paper of foreign and domestic manufacture, beg to submit to your committee our views on changes in Schedule M which we consider desirable.

While the American paper industry is one of the most advanced in the world, and while its products are exported on a very large scale to all parts of the world, Schedule M contains a number of rates which are absolutely probibitory, leaving the American consumer of such necessities as writing paper, tissue papers, strawboard, and others entirely at the mercy of the combinations of manufacturers in these lines.

Most of the rates in Schedule M are composed of specific and ad valorem duties, the effect of this being that the specific duties practically shut out from import the cheaper qualities used in immense quantities in every day life, and admit the highpriced qualities which are more or less luxuries, used by comparatively few people, at a lower

percentage. Respectfully submitted.

WILKINSON BROS. & Co.
Rose & FRANK Co.
NEUMANN & HADLEY.
ADOLPH KRAUT Co.
JAPAN PAPER Co.
RHINELAND IMPORT PAPER Co.
H. N. HILL.
MERCHANTS IMPORTING Co.
GERMANIA IMPORTING Co.

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408. We suggest that the rate of duty be made 20 per cent ad valorem.

Filter masse is used by breweries, oil refineries, and in many other industries. It is made chiefly of American cotton, and a lower price would increase its consumption. We estimate imports at $80,000, yielding a revenue of $16,000 against $13,062 in 1912.

Year.

Imports.

Duty
paid.

1911.
1912.

$43, 045
45, 734

Per cent.

28. 82
28. 26

409. Printing paper (other than paper 409. We suggest the following changes in commercially known as handmade or phraseology and rates of duty.“Printing machine handmade paper, japan paper, paper, unsized, sized, or glued, suitable and imitation japan paper by whatever for the printing of books and newspapers, name known), unsized, sized, or glued, not specially provided for in this section, suitable for the printing of books and valued at not above 3 cents per pound, newspapers, but not for covers or bind- 5 per cent ad valorem, valued at over 3 inge, not specially provided for in this

cents per pound 10 per cent ad valorem:

section, valued at not above 27 cents per | Provided, however, That as long as such pound, three-sixteenths of 1 cent per papers valued at not above 4 cents per pound; valued above 27 cents and not pound are admitted free of duty from above 24 cents per pound, three-tenths Canada, they shall also be admitted free of 1 cent per pound; valued above 21 of duty from other countries." cents per pound and not above 4 cents The subject of the duties on printing per pound, five-tenths of 1 cent per paper has been exhaustively discussed pound; valued above 4 cents and not before your committee and elsewhere. above 5 cents per pound, eight-tenths of The present free entry from Canada of 1 cent per pound; valued above 5 cents paper valued at not above 4 cents per per pound, 15 per cent ad valorem; Pro- pound benefits only a small number of vided, however, That if any country, American capitalists who own large tracts dependency, Province, or other subdi- of forest land and paper mills in Canada. vision of Government shall forbid or If free entry from Canada is not rerestrict in any way the exportation of pealed, then international obligations as (whether by law, order, regulation, con- well as fairness and justice demand that tractual relation, or otherwise, directly free entry of papers valued at not above or indirectly) or impose any export duty, 4 cents per pound be extended also to all export license fee, or other export charge other countries. of any kind whatsoever (whether in form If the above suggestions should be of additional charge or license fee or other- i adopted, and provided free entry from wise) upon printing paper, wood pulp, Canada is repealed, we estimate imports or wood for use in the manufacture of valued at not above 3 cents per pound at wood pulp, there shall be imposed upon $2,500,000 and valued above 3 cents per printing paper when imported either pound at $700,000, yielding a revenue of directly or indirectly from such country, $195,000 against $145,657 in 1912. dependency, Province, or other subdivision of Government, an additional duty of one-tenth of 1 cent per pound when valued at 3 cents per pound, or less, and in addition thereto the amount of such export duty or other export charge imposed by such country, dependency, Province, or other subdivision of Government, upon printing paper, wood pulp, or wood for use in the manufacture of wood pulp.

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410. Papers commonly known as copy- 410. We suggest a duty of 25 per cent ing paper, stereotype paper, bibulous ad valorem. The present rates of duty paper, tissue paper, pottery paper, and all are practically prohibitory except on high papers not specially provided for in this priced specialties. section, colored or uncolored, white or

We estimate importations would printed, weighing not over 6 pounds to amount to $600,600, yielding a revenue of the ream of 480 sheets, on the basis 20 by $150,000, against $159,960 in 1912 30 inches, and whether in reams or any other form, 6 cents per pound and 15 per cent ad valorem; if weighing, over 6 pounds and less than 10 pounds to the ream, and letter copying books, whether wholly or partly manufactured, 5 cents per pound and 15 per cent ad valorem; crepe paper and filtering paper, 5 cents per pound and 15 per cent ad valorem: Provided, That no article composed wholly or in chief value of one or more of the papers specified in this paragraph shall pay a less rate of duty than that imposed upon the component paper of chief value of which such article is made.

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411. Papers with coated surface or sur- 411. We suggest the following changes faces, not specially provided for in this in phraseology and rates: “Papers with section, 5 cents per pound. Imports, coated surface or surfaces, not specially 1911, $312,910; duty, 63.45 percent. provided for in this section, 35 per cent Imports, 1912, $305,354; duty, 56.73 per ad valorem. Papers used for printing cent.

magazines, newspapers, or books, coated both surfaces, 15 per cent ad valorem."

We estimate imports at the rates suggested above $500,000 at 35 per cent and $100,000 at 15 per cent, yielding a revenue

of $190,000, against $173,205 in 1912. A. If wholly or partly covered with A, C, D. We suggest a duty of 35 per metal or its solutions (except as herein- cent ad valorem. after provided), or with gelatin or flock, We estimate that imports, including or if embossed or printed, 5 cente per sections C and D, would be $400,000, pound and 20 per cent ad valorem: yielding a revenue of $140,000 against

$108,070 in 1912.

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B. Papers, including wrapping paper, B. We suggest the following changes with the surface decorated or covered in phraseology and rates: “Papers with with a design, fancy effect, pattern, or the surface decorated, or covered with a character, whether produced in the pulp design, fancy effect, pattern, or character,

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or otherwise, but not by lithographic whether produced in the pulp or otherprocess, 44 cents per pound:

wise, but not by lithographic process or felt marks, 25 per cent ad valorem."

The changes in the phraseology are
Year.

Imports.
Duty.

suggested because wrapping papers with
lines or so-called felt marks worth 2 or 3

cents per pound, and costing no more to $59, 007

make than plain papers, which under the 68, 417

Dingley tariff paid 25 per cent ad valorem, have to pay under the present tariff the prohibitive duty of 4 cents per pound, equal to 150-160 per cent. Only two or three American mills are benefited.

We estimate imports at $120,000, yielding a revenue of $30,000 against $31, 770 in 1912.

1911. 1912.

Per cent.

58.94
47. 06

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E. Parchment papers, and grease-proof E. We suggest the following changes in and imitation parchment papers which phraseology and rates: "Parchment pahave been supercalendered and rendered | per, and grease-proof and imitation parchtransparent, or partially so, by whatever ment papers which have been supercalname known, 2 cents per pound and 10 endered and rendered transparent or per cent ad valorem:

partially so, in all weights, by whatever
name known, 20 per cent ad valorem."

These papers paid under the Dirgley
Year.
Imports. Duty

tariff as n. s. p. f. a duty of 25 per cent ad valorem. The rate was changed for the

benefit of two or three American mills $226, 708

and to the detriment of a large number of 213, 266

business people who use these papers for wrapping purposes.

We estimate imports at $400,000, yielding a revenue of $80,000 against $104,730 in 1912.

1911. 1912.

Per cent

52. 90
49.29

1911. 1912.

Per cent.

51. 50

F All other grease-proof and imita- F "All other grease-proof and imitation parchment papers, not specially tion parchment papers, not specially provided for in this section, by whatever provided for in this section, in all weights, name known, 2 cents per pound aná 10 and by, whatever name known, 15 per per cent ad valorem.

cent valorem."

These papers (excepting so-called vege

table parchment paper of which only an Year. Imports. Duty. insignificant amount is imported) paid

under the Dingley tariff a duty of 25

per cent ad valorem, and the present $186,844

tariff is prohibitive on the cheaper grades 81,541 44.95 of these papers chiefly used for wrapping

purposes, and is rapidly becoming prohibitive on all grades.

We estimate imports at $300,000, yielding a revenue of $60,000 against $36,636

in 1912. G Bags, envelopes, printed matter G We suggest striking out this section other than lithographic, and all other and it to be covered by paragraph 420. articles composed wholly or in chief value of any of the foregoing papers, not specially provided for in this section, and all boxes of paper or wood covered with any of the foregoing paper, 5 cents a pound and 30 per cent ad valorem.

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1911, 1912.

H Albumenized or sensitized paper A We suggest rates of duty increased or paper otherwise surface coated for to 40 per cent. photographic purposes, 30 per cent ad The import of these papers is controlled valorem.

absolutely by an international trust in photographic materials, which bars out

foreign or domestic competition. These Year.

Imports. papers may be considered a luxury, and

as such they ought to pay an adequate $488,040

revenue to the Government. 436, 484

We estimate imports at $450,000, yielding a revenue of $180,000 against $130,943

in 1912. 1. Plain basic papers for albumenizing, I. We suggest rates of duty as follows: sensitizing, baryta coating or for photo- “If valued at not over 12 cents per graphic or solar printing processes, 3 cents pound, 15 per cent ad valorem; if over 12 per pound and 10 per cent ad valorem. cents per pound, 20 per cent ad valorem."

The present rate of duty practically ex

cludes low-priced papers, especially those Year. Imports. Duty. used as a basis for so-called blue prints as

necessary as the daily bread for every

architect and draftsman. $658, 999

We estimate imports valued under 12 525, 519

cents $160,000, over 12 cents $660,000, yielding a revenue of $156,000, against

$147,894 in 1912. 413. Writing, letter, note, handmade 413. We suggest following changes in paper and paper commercially known as phraseology and rates. handmade paper and machine handmade “Writing, letter, note, ledger, bond, paper, Japan paper, and

imitation Japan record, tablet, typewriter, onionskin, and paper, by whatever name known, and imitation onionskin papers, calendered or ledger, bond, record, tablet, typewriter, uncalendered, in all weights, 20 per cent manifold, and onionskin and imitation 1 ad valorem.

1911 1912.

Per cent.

28. 65 28. 15

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