Duns Scotus

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Oxford University Press, 1999 M06 17 - 272 páginas
This is an accessible introduction to the life and thought of John Duns Scotus (c. 1266--1308), the scholastic philosopher and theologian who came to be called the Subtle Doctor. A native of Scotland (as his name implies), Scotus became a Franciscan and taught in Oxford, Paris, and Cologne. In his writings he put Aristotelian thought to the service of Christian theology and was the founder of a school of scholasticism called Scotism, which was often opposed to the Thomism of the followers of Thomas Aquinas. In particular, Scotus is well known for his defense of contra-causal free will and logical possibility and for his account of individuation in terms of "haecceity" or "thisness." Cross offers a clear introductory account of the most significant aspects of Scotus's theological thought. Theology is here construed broadly to include Scotus's philosophical investigation of God's existence and attributes. In addition to providing a clear, though not always uncritical, outline of Scotus's positions, Cross aims to show how Scotus's theories fit into modern debates, particularly contemporary debates in philosophical theology, and to point out Scotus's historical significance in the development of theology.
 

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Contenido

1 Duns Scotus Philosophy and Theology
3
Existence Unicity and Simplicity
15
Perfection Infinity and Religious Language
31
Knowledge and Agency
47
5 God the Trinity
61
Body Soul and Immortality
73
Freedom Ethics and Sin
83
Predestination Merit and Grace
101
Predestination and Merit
127
11 Sacraments
135
Appendix
147
Notes
153
Bibliography
215
Index Locorum
226
General Index
240
Derechos de autor

God and Man
113

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