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you gentlemen can not select one or two others of the delegation to make the oral argument in addition to what Mr. Meyercord has said and then content yourselves with filing briefs as to the balance !

Mr. BLANEY. I was going to say, with the idea of saving your time and the committee's time, that I have made some suggested changes in a brief which I will file with the committee so as to save your time, and my remarks will not exceed five minutes.

The CHAIRMAN. The difficulty is that you will talk for ten minutes and then the committee will ask you questions for an hour on something that is in your brief.

Mr. BLANEY. I will not read my brief, but I will submit it and it can be taken up at the leisure of the committee.

STATEMENT OF FRANK J. BLANEY, REPRESENTING FORBES

LITHOGRAPH MANUFACTURING CO., BOSTON, MASS.

SATURDAY, November 21, 1908. Mr. BLANEY. Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the committee, I appear on behalf of the Forbes Lithograph Manufacturing Company, of Boston, Mass., a large concern. It is not a member of the National Association, as is Mr. Meyercord, but we indorse in every particular the brief he has submitted, with a few minor changes which we believe would be clearer.

This imported work is not used very largely on manufactured products. Imported work is used principally as advertising. It is not work where if there were a little increase in the price it would make any material difference to the manufacturer in the cost of his product, and if the statement shall be made that the imported product is brought into this country because the American lithographer can not produce it as good as it is done abroad, I will submit these samples (exhibiting samples) of our commercial work in contradiction.

We ask most earnestly that in making this law the old paragraph 400 shall be ignored entirely, so far as its present provisions are concerned, since they are so radically wrong. For instance, under the present provision a show card, 16 by 24, on paper eight one-thousandths of 1 inch in thickness, should bear a certain rate. go up to just 10 pounds more on the same size sheet you get a still different rate, a rate of 8 cents a pound. If you go still further to 16 by 26, thereby having a square-inch area of over four hundred, you will get another different rate. It applies from a specific rate of 20 cents on paper not exceeding eight one-thousandths of an inch in thickness to an ad valorem rate, and it has been practically impossible to get a fair valuation on the importations while the ad valorem rate remains, and the briefs that have been submitted by Mr. Meyercord and the one I shall file with you seek to make it so clear that there will be no question as to the interpretation of the custom officials.

The CHAIRMAN. Do you import all your material?

Mr. BLANEY. We import part of the ink and all of the bronze and metal leaf that are used in printing.

The CHAIRMAN. What percentage do you import?

If you

Mr. BLANEY. We import all the inks and metal leaf that are used in printing.

This is a very widespread industry. There are 350 establishments, and the competition would keep down any arbitrary advance in price to the manufacturers. There is no trust in the business, and all we ask, Mr. Chairman, is a sufficient protection that will cover the difference between the wages paid abroad and the wages paid in this country, plus a reasonable profit.

BRIEF SUBMITTED FOR THE FORBES LITHOGRAPH MANUFAC

TURING COMPANY, BY FRANK J. BLANEY, DIRECTOR, RELATIVE TO LITHOGRAPHIC PRINTS.

BOSTON, MASS., November 20, 1908. To Hon. SERENO E. PAYNE, Chairman Ways and Means Committee,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. DEAR SIR: The Forbes Lithograph Manufacturing Company, of Boston, lithographers, established at that point, respectfully present the following recommendations as an amendment to the schedule proposed on lithographic material (paragraph 400) by the tariff committee of the National Association of Employing Lithographers. We ask that section 400 of the 1897 tariff be amended to read as follows:

Proposed amendment to paragraph 400.

. 27

. 15

Lithographic prints from stone, zinc, aluminum, or other material, bound or unbound (except cigar labels, flaps, bands, or other small labels), not elsewhere specified, or any article made up in chief value of lithographic prints:

Per

pound. On paper or other material not exceeding ten one-thousandths inch in thickness

$0.30 If embossed or die cut..

.33 If both embossed and die cut

. 36 Exceeding ten one-thousandths inch and not exceeding twenty one-thousandths inch in thickness.

. 25 If embossed or die cut. If both embossed and die cut..

29 On cardboard or other material exceeding twenty one-thousandths inch in thickness If embossed or die cut.

. 16 If both embossed and die cut--

.17 Lithographic labels, flaps, and bands, lettered or blank, printed from stone, zinc, aluminum, or other material: Labels and flaps, exceeding 10 square inches, if printed in less than 8

colors (bronze printing to be counted as 3 colors), but not including metal-leaf printing----

.30 Smail labels and bands, less than 10 square inches, printed in less than 8

colors (bronze printing to be counted as 3 colors), but not including metal-leaf printing

.60 Labels or flaps, exceeding 10 square inches, printed in 8 or more colors

(bronze printing to be counted as 3 colors), but not including metaljear printing

.40 Small labels and bands, less than 10 square inches, printed in 8 or more

colors (bronze printing to be counted as 3 colors), but not including metal-leaf printing---

.80

. 10

Per

pound Labels and flaps, exceeding 10 square inches, printed in whole or in part in metal leaf and not over 5 additional printings..

$0.50 Labels and flaps, exceeding 10 square inches, printed in whole or in part in metal leaf and over 5 additional printings.

.75 Small labels and bands, less than 10 square inches, printed in whole or in part in metal leaf and not over 5 additional printings --

1.00 Small labels and bands, less than 10 square inches, printed in whole or in part in metal leaf and over 5 additional printings...

1.50 For any embossed label, flap, or band add.--

The reasons for our dissenting from the recommendations of the tariff committee referred to are as follows:

On the item of “ Paper or other material” they recommend eight one-thousandths inch in thickness as the dividing point. This is not a logical point at which to make the difference in thickness, for the reason that the same class of material--that is, hangers, calendars, etc.--are printed on paper 60, 70, SO. 90, and 100 pounds to the ream of 500 sheets, size 22 by 28. The tariff committee of the employers' association took this arbitrary division from the tariff now in force, and this is entirely wrong, as will be seen from the following facts:

For an importation of 100,000 show cards or hangers, size 16 by 24, lithographed on stock eight one-thousandths inch in thickness, which is 88 pounds to the ream of 500 sheets, basis 22 by 28, the weight on the shipment would be 11,000 pounds, and at the rate recommended by the committee-30 cents per pound—the duty on the importation would be $3,300, whereas if stock nine one-thousandths of an inch in thickness were used, weighing 100 pounds to the ream of 500 sheets, size 22 by 28, it would then pass to the rate suggested by the committee--of 20 cents per pound-thus making the weight of the shipment of 100,000 hangers, 16 by 24, 12,400 pounds; and at the 20-cent per pound rate specified by the committee for this thickness it would make the revenue $2,480, as against $3,300 on the lighter stock, thus saving the importer $820 duty for a show card made on a thicker stock, which would be more desirable for his purpose, and the increase he would have to pay for the increase in cost of stock, owing to heavier weight, would be at the rate of 6 cents per pound-$84-and the increased freight would not be over $6, so that the increase in the cost on account of the heavier stock would not exceed $90, which would thus give a net saving of $730 by reason of having the hangers on a heavier stock; and this, of course, would be a corresponding loss to the Government on revenues.

The division we have suggested is ten one-thousandths of an inch, and instead of dropping from 30 to 20 cents per pound (as suggested by the tariff committee referred to) we recommend the rate we have named above, 25 cents per pound, which is a drop of 5 cents, owing to the increased thickness.

In connection with the item under the heading of “Lithographed labels, flaps, and bands," we take occasion to include small labels not exceeding 10 square inches, and the reason for this is that the same policy which properly prevails in providing a suitable rate per pound on cigar bands, owing to the small size and the large number to a pound, should dictate that any label, no matter for what purpose it may be used, should receive the same protection as the cigar band. In explanation of this and to illustrate our contention we attach hereto a sheet marked “A,” on which we pasted impressions of dies used on labels for perfumery bottles and other small articles, to show size to which labels are cut. On the same sheet we have attached cigar bands, showing that the cigar band is in many cases larger than the small labels used for perfumery and other articles. Owing to the inadequate protection afforded the American lithographers on these small labels, a large quantity are imported, and foreign houses dealing almost exclusively in this branch of business maintain agencies here. On 100,000 labels, size 24 by 4, the weight would be 185 pounds if printed on stock basis 50 pounds to the ream of 500 sheets, size 22 by 28-and this is the heaviest-weight paper that is used for this purpose and in many cases a lighter paper is used. One hundred thousand such labels made in America, if in 10 printings of a grade usually used for this work, would be sold at approximately $3.50 per thousand, or $350 for the 100,000, whereas at the rate of wages shown to prevail abroad, as given in detail by the tariff committee of the National Association of Lithographers, even the rate of tariff suggested by them would not represent the full difference between the cost of production here and abroad.

With the changes suggested above, we heartily indorse the recommendations of the tariff committee referred to, but believe in incorporating the following clause as a section under this heading of “Lithographic imports : "

“Lithographs cased with other products: No box, case, or other package containing any importation to this country, not included in this paragraph, shall contain any lithographic prints from stone, zinc, aluminum, or other material, or other items or goods listed in this section.”

The purpose of this is to prevent foreign exporters or manufacturers from including 1, 2, 3, or other small number of show cards or other lithographed or advertising matter in the cases or packages containing the product they are sending to this country to sell. As foreign importations of certain goods amount in the aggregate to a large number of cases, the inclusion of show cards, lithographs, etc., in the case or package containing the commodity not only is a source of loss to the lithographic industry of the United States, but also is a very large loss of revenue to the Government, and the above paragraph, if adopted, would cause the importer to bring his lithographed or other advertising matter into the country in separate cases, thus causing a duty to be levied on same, with a corresponding amount of revenue to the Government.

[graphic][graphic][graphic]

(Submitted by The Forbes Lithograph Manufacturing Company, Boston, Mass., to show that small labels for any purpose should have same pound rate as cigar bands, on account of size.)

Legend..
We recommend that the following be incorporated into the new law:

Each and every label, band, wrapper, show card, or other lithographic print from stone, zinc, aluminum, or other material, shall bear on the face of same,

printed in legible letters in English, the legend "Printed in of the country of origin to follow the words “ Printed in."

,” the name

Marimum and minimum.

Should the committee in its wisdom incorporate the principle of the “maximum and minimum tariff,” we earnestly pray that the foregoing rates shall be adopted as the minimum rates, and that the maximum rates shall be 20 per cent in excess thereof on each and every item.

Lithographic industry in the United States. We have refrained from entering into a general discussion of the merits of the matter, believing same to be covered by the brief submitted by the tariff committee referred to, and would only add as a conclusion that the lithographic industry opens up a very large opportunity for American art, inasmuch as the different establishments are constantly buying the works of many noted artists in this country, and the young artists especially are to a considerable extent dependent upon the trade for their support and encouragement. Respectfully submitted.

THE FORBES LITHOGRAPH MANUFACTURING CO., By I'RANK J. BLANEY,

A Director of the Company.

STATEMENT OF OTTO PALM, OF NEW YORK CITY, RELATIVE TO

DUTIES ON DECALCOMANIA TRANSFERS.

SATURDAY, November 21, 1908. Mr. Palm. If the committee will permit, I would like to say a few words in reply to the arguments or statements that were made by Mr. Meyercord on decalcomanias. Of course, I think it is a mistake on our part to occupy the attention of this committee on such a small matter.

Decalcomania is a very small item going into the lithograph paragraph. Decalcomania is not an article that is used indiscriminately as other lithographic prints are, because a lithographic print when it comes to this country is simply sold as a lithographic print, as a postal card, visiting card, New Year's card, Christmas card,

or chromos or calendars. Decalcomania is something entirely different. Decalcomania as it is imported or made here is not perfect in itself; it is simply an article that goes into the manufacture of other articles, without which decalcomania is of no use whatever. For instance, the pottery industry in the United States consumes about one-half of the decalcomania. Now, if you want to foster the industry of pottery, it is necessary to bring the decalcomania into this country and manufacture it here as low as possible in order to compete with the pottery that is imported from foreign countries. Of course pottery is not the only item on which the decalcomania is used. There are a number of other items on which it is used, but the pottery industry is particularly interested in this provision. As far as we are concerned, I think we all agree that we are satisfied to let the duty on decalcomania remain as it is now. We do not ask for any reduction or any increase.

Mr. UNDERWOOD. Please explain how you use it in pottery!

Mr. PalM. Here is a lithograph that is printed on decalcomania paper, or, in other words, transferring paper. [Exhibiting.] Cer

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